Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "custody" ...

  • The final days of Laura and Walton

    Laura Connell believed she was going to lose custody of her only child, Walton, despite years of abuse at the hands of her child’s father. After coming to Delaware to escape the abuse and appealing to the Delaware courts, it appeared she was still going to have to turn over her son to his father. She never did – instead killing first him and then herself on the morning of her family court hearing. Hundreds of pages of court documents, medical records and other records provided both by Laura herself and the courts detail the abuse and claims Laura said never reached a judge or were taken seriously. The story explains why mothers kill their children and what can drive parents to commit murder- suicide in a world in which we often lack those answers.
  • WNYC: New Jersery Jail Deaths

    This three-part radio series exposed New Jersey jails as among the deadliest in the nation, with no consistent method of accountability.
  • KXAN: DENIED

    Texas law gives police discretion to withhold information when suspects die in custody. Legislative efforts to close that loophole have failed, but it has not stopped the families who have been denied video and other records detailing their loved ones' final moments from speaking out. A KXAN investigation sheds light on this statewide need for police accountability, transparency and trust.
  • Desperate Choices: Giving Up Custody For Care

    Lisa Chedekel, senior writer, Connecticut Health I-Team, uncovered a practice within the state's Department of Children and Families (DCF) of coercing parents of children with severe behavioral problems to give up custody of their children, in exchange for needed care. Although DCF officials said the practice was rare, C-HIT found that more than 860 children were given up to state custody since 2011 because their families could not access "specialized care." https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wfa8wsOdrog
  • The Death of Linwood Lambert

    MSNBC Chief Legal Correspondent Ari Melber’s exhaustive investigation into the death of a Virginia man in police custody. Linwood "Ray" Lambert died three years ago, after police took him to a local hospital for medical care. But police never brought Lambert inside, instead tasing him repeatedly at the doorway to the hospital, and later inside a squad car. In September, Melber obtained 80 minutes of security camera footage. Melber led a months-long investigation, combing through the video to reconstruct the incident, obtaining previously unreleased police, medical and investigative files, and interviewing dozens of sources. The material gave MSNBC an opportunity to tell the story of that deadly night for the first time. State investigators and local prosecutors provided Melber some of their first public comments on the incident. Melber’s work also spurred outcry from officials and civil rights leaders, including calls for a resolution to the case by Virginia’s governor, and both U.S. Senators from Virginia.
  • Freddie Gray Investigation

    WBAL-TV’s lead investigative reporter, Jayne Miller, led the way locally, and nationally, on the investigation into what happened to Freddie Gray, the 25 year old Baltimore man critically injured while in police custody, and who died a week later. Gray was injured on April 12, 2015. Miller immediately started questioning why Gray was arrested, and what happened inside the police van. Over the next three weeks she filed more than a dozen reports, utilizing multiple sources and witnesses. She revealed a troubling timeline that detailed the moment Gray was arrested, the stops police made, and how long it took them to finally get Gray the medical attention he so desperately needed. Her reports raise important questions about probable cause, police policy, and accountability. http://www.wbaltv.com/tv/about/ire-freddie-gray-investigation/37381262
  • The death of Freddie Gray

    The April death of a West Baltimore man in police custody quickly spiraled into a controversy that left some city neighborhoods in flames, and brought attention from national and international media. Within days, the name Freddie Gray became associated with the broader debate over the way police across the nation treated African-Americans. Central to that debate was a singular question: How did Gray die? The Baltimore Sun set out to provide an answer by investigating allegations of police brutality and dissecting the crucial minutes after Gray was arrested. Reporters revealed that Gray was not the first person to be seriously injured in a police transport van, and that officers routinely ignored calls by detainees for medical care. http://data.baltimoresun.com/news/police-convictions/ http://data.baltimoresun.com/news/intake-logs/rejections/ http://data.baltimoresun.com/freddie-gray/
  • Tragedy on the Water

    A 20-year-old Iowa man died on May 31, 2014, while in the custody of a Missouri Highway Patrol trooper on the Lake of the Ozarks. Brandon Ellingson, stopped for suspicion of boating while intoxicated, was being transported to a patrol zone office when he fell – or, as the patrol initially said, jumped – from the trooper’s boat. His wrists were locked in handcuffs behind his back, and the life vest the trooper had placed over his head soon came off. Ellingson struggled to keep his head above water for several minutes before slipping to the bottom of the lake. Subsequent reporting revealed a series of mistakes by the trooper, a road veteran who had not received proper training to work the water after the Missouri Water Patrol was merged into the Highway Patrol in 2011.
  • Deaths in Detention

    This project was the first-ever analysis of 18 people who died in the custody of law enforcement agencies throughout Milwaukee County during the five-year period ending in 2012, not including suspects shot by police. At least 10 of them had medical or psychiatric conditions that were improperly monitored or left untreated by authorities. None of the 18 custody deaths resulted in criminal charges against an officer. Discipline was handed down in just two cases — both under the jurisdiction of the Sheriff’s Department — and the punishment of many of the officers was overturned. The Journal Sentinel analysis found that in the aftermath of in-custody deaths, pathologists, prosecutors and law enforcement rely on each others’ conclusions — even when those conclusions are flawed — ensuring no one is held accountable when prisoners die.
  • Death in Paradise

    Two-story series on a Key West in-custody death which led city officials to ask the Department of Justice for a thorough investigation not only of Key West Police, but also of the state law enforcement agency, the district attorney and the county medical examiner. GM retiree Charles Eimers died following a routine traffic stop in Key West on Thanksgiving 2013. Police told emergency responders that Eimers fled a traffic stop, then ran away and collapsed on the beach, but a cell phone video acquired by CBS News showed Eimers surrendering before being surrounded by officers. Months later, CBS obtained a second tourist video that clearly showed police lied under oath in video depositions about the possibility that Eimers had been suffocated in the sand while being placed under arrest. Police and the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, which was called in to investigate the in-custody death, both had contact information to obtain the tourist video, but neglected to obtain it over the course of a seven month investigation.