Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "customs" ...

  • To fulfill Trump’s vision on immigration, sheriffs are trampling over constitutional principles

    “To fulfill Trump’s vision on immigration, sheriffs are trampling over constitutional principles,” by Yvette Cabrera and published in ThinkProgress, examines the practice by sheriff’s departments across the country who are holding people in jail past their release date at the request of Immigration and Customs Enforcement [ICE] using a technique that legal experts say raises serious questions about potential constitutional rights violations.
  • The Intercept: Detained, then Violated

    The Intercept obtained hundreds of complaints of sexual and physical abuse in immigration detention, in response to a public records request with the Department of Homeland Security’s Office of Inspector General, which is tasked with independently reviewing the department’s various agencies, including ICE and Border Patrol.
  • Border Patrol

    We believe this is the most extensive investigation on the U.S. border conducted by a Sunday news program in 2016. We begin by revealing one of the biggest issues that’s gotten lost in the debate over illegal immigration: the disturbing increase in drug smuggling. In Border Control, we find evidence that our southern border is not under U.S. control. In Tunnel Vision, we expose some of the underground tunnels that cartels have used to smuggle drugs and people into the U.S. In Bordertown, USA, we provide an unusual profile of a U.S. border town so influenced by illegal smugglers and drugs, that the culture has worked its way into the fabric of daily life: Douglas, Arizona. In Crossing the Line, we take an eye opening look at the corruption inside U.S. Customs and Border Protection. And in Cuban Exodus, we exclusively reveal the “mind-boggling” number of Cubans surging across the Mexican border into the U.S.
  • Stolen Gun Deaths

    We began our investigation into lost and stolen guns after Bay Area woman Kate Steinle was shot and killed with a gun stolen from the vehicle of a Bureau of Land Management Ranger. By the time we finished our story months later, three more people had been killed with stolen guns in the Bay Area, including an Oakland muralist murdered with a gun stolen from an officer with U.S. Customs and Border Patrol. Our investigation uncovered hundreds of guns missing from Bay Area law enforcement agencies and hundreds more reported stolen from federal law enforcement agencies. Following our investigation, two major Bay Area cities announced ordinances aimed at preventing gun thefts. https://youtu.be/4Mi4jX7galQ
  • Families behind the wall: The rise and fall of family detention

    A series of exclusive reports on alleged misconduct and abuse at the Obama administration’s family detention centers. There are more than 50 stories exposing a pattern of accused mistreatment of detainees – some of whom said they were sexually assaulted by guards in front of their children – at three federal facilities run by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement operated in rural Pennsylvania and Texas, far from any major city and the lawyers who worked there.
  • ISIS Hits Home: San Bernardino

    As news of the horrific San Bernadino unfolded and all three networks went into live coverage mode, the ABC News investigative team started digging , providing investigative reporting in real time, both accurate and exclusive coverage for to a national stunned by the first major domestic terror attack by followers of ISIS. Chief Investigative Correspondent Brian Ross and the ABC News Investigative team brought insights and exclusives starting with the first (and still exclusive ) photo of the female attacker Tashfeen Malik and perhaps the most riveting of images, the first exclusive look at the terror couple, husband and wife as they entered the United States through customs.
  • Border Patrol Sex Assaults

    CBS News investigation revealed “disturbing” sex abuse within the country’s largest law enforcement agency US Customs and Border Protection. A former top official of the agency told us for the first time that he notified his superiors of a “spike” in sexual misconduct by agents that was significantly higher than any other federal law enforcement agency as well as other large metropolitan police departments. As a result of our story – the DHS integrity council met with our whistleblower and then issued a series of recommended changes to CBP.
  • Pregnant Detainees in Immigration Detention

    Women caught up in America’s immigration detention complex are some of the most vulnerable in the world. As policy, Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) says that pregnant women should be put on house arrest while fighting their deportation cases, rather than detained in prison-like facilities. After they told us repeatedly that they “don’t detain pregnant women” we found quite the contrary. Through serialized reporting, Fusion uncovered that nearly 600 pregnant detainees were held in detention centers in the last two years. Women that we spoke with said they were severely underfed and denied basic prenatal treatment. As the reporter and producer on the project, I, Cristina Costantini, uncovered that the agency even initially lied about a miscarriage that occurred in one detention center.
  • Using Jailed Migrants as a Pool of Cheap Labor

    The U.S. government is the nation's single largest employer of undocumented immigrants. This was the startling discovery of a 7-month investigation into a little-known program that allows the federal Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency to employ these immigrants and pay them a $1 a day or less to perform most of the jobs running the 250 federal immigration detention centers around the country. This finding was even more striking considering the number of undocumented workers involved -- more than 60,000 per year -- and the amount of money the federal government saves and private prison companies make (at least $40 million annually) as a direct result of being allowed to pay these people so far below the minimum wage, or about 13 cents per hour.
  • Synthetic Drugs : The Race Against the Chemists

    Our major finding : We found out that synthetic drugs get through Canadian customs quite easily. Most of them legally. The synopsis of our document is attached with our submission. The story started with a number found in a UN Report that grabbed our attention : 58. It’s the number of new psychoactive substances which entered Canada legally, according to a the 2013 report from the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crimes. We were able to find a synthetic drug dealer who’s doing business on internet. It was our most significant source. Our source and others targeted by our story revealed how it is possible to get drugs into Canada by simply using the postal service.