Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "cybersecurity" ...

  • PublicSource: Pittsburgh's lack of cybersecurity and transparency

    The City of Pittsburgh's cybersecurity is lacking, according to a commissioned report, and officials won't address the issues publicly. That same report found serious issues with the way the city handles software and other IT projects and how it structures its Department of Innovation & Performance. Through a public records request and "copy and paste" sleuthing, PublicSource revealed details about how city cybersecurity and IT practices are lacking, potentially putting citizens and local government at risk.
  • 60 Minutes: Hacking Democracy

    During the 2016 presidential election, Russian operatives launched a widespread cyberattack against state voting systems around the country. While officials say no votes were changed on election day, America's election infrastructure remains vulnerable just seven months before the 2018 midterm elections.
  • Election Integrity: The Southern Vote Project

    In our groundbreaking, exclusive, “flood-the-zone” Southern Vote Project, WhoWhatWhy probed the state of election integrity and revealed deep problems, including widespread disenfranchisement of large segments of the voting public. Sending a full-time team to several southern states, we documented a broad range of factors, some seemingly intentional, that resulted in voter suppression or created cybersecurity vulnerabilities. Because we were uniquely focused on this topic, we started breaking stories that other outlets were unwilling or unable to pursue. Our work played an important role in compelling legacy news outlets to begin covering this issue. Our hard-hitting coverage also resulted in several lawsuits, which in turn brought about changes in how votes were counted through court decisions made in the heat of the elections.
  • How to Hack An Election

    The inside story of how a cybercriminal for hire teamed with Latin's America's most notorious fixer to influence presidential elections and subvert government power across the continent for a decade. Despite a wealth of cybersecurity reporting in recent years, the ability of computer hackers to disrupt the democratic foundation of elections had gone virtually unchronicled. This Bloomberg Businessweek article not only showed it could be done, it took the reader deep inside the operations with a hacker, who put himself in danger by speaking. The ground-breaking story stunned readers, journalists and officials in several countries. And it proved to be a roadmap to the disruption of the U.S. presidential election later in the year, with Russian agents accused of using digital tools to manipulate social media and to produce fake news that influenced public opinion.