Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "dealers" ...

  • Easy Targets

    There are some sixty-three thousand licensed gun dealers in the U.S.—nearly twice the number of McDonald’s and Starbucks combined. But, unlike other businesses that deal in dangerous products, such as pharmacies or explosives makers, most gun stores face no legal requirements to secure their merchandise. As a result, there has been a sharp increase in gun-store thefts. This story focuses on a group of thieves who preyed on gun stores in North Carolina, stealing more than two hundred weapons over a four-month period. The Trace and The New Yorker relied on thousands of public records and more than fifty interviews to track these guns through a network of black-market profiteers.
  • Dirty Gold, Clean Cash

    "Dirty Gold, Clean Cash" was an extensive Miami Herald investigation sparked by a federal court case into how organized crime groups, including narco-traffickers, are using destructive illegal gold mines in Latin America to launder money through precious metals -- metals which ultimately end up in the hands of unsuspecting American consumers as jewelry, electronics and bullion. The trade has a crucial logistical hub in Miami. The series required extensive on-the-ground reporting in Peru and Colombia, a challenge for a local paper like the Miami Herald but one which the paper was prepared for because of its longstanding commitment to foreign reporting.
  • Direkt36: Russian arms dealers

    Two Russian arms dealers operating in Hungary, Vladimir Lyubishin Sr. and Jr., were apprehended as a result of a U.S. DEA sting operation in late 2016. The Lyubishins wanted to supply a Mexican drug cartel with weapons to protect shipments of cocaine against US authorities and rival gangs. In reality, the Russians were negotiating with paid DEA informants. After the arrests, however, the Lyubishins managed to escape US justice thanks to Hungary’s Kremlin-friendly government as Hungary denied Washington’s request for extradition and sent the two arms dealers to Moscow instead. The operation as well as the extradition scandal was kept secret and was first revealed by my story.
  • Sale of Ammunition to Minors

    In the national debate over gun control, we discovered little attention is focused on the sale of ammunition to minors. We went undercover to see if federally licensed firearms dealers followed the law regarding ammunition sales to minors.
  • The Double-Dealers Behind China's Counterfeiting Industry

    Drawing on exclusive sourcing and hundreds of pages of legal documentation from four countries, this AP investigation examines why counterfeiters in China, the source of most of the world’s counterfeit goods, are winning the costly fight against fakes. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sxwJ1DLuveM https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S0KhDejOWkg
  • ABC News Investigation Uncovers Hundreds of New Vehicles Across the U.S. Sold with Open Safety Recalls

    In this hidden-camera investigation, ABC News went undercover and bought a brand new truck with an open safety recall. ABC News also found that hundreds of vehicles from various automakers were sold illegally with open recalls at more than 100 dealerships across the United States. The story was broadcast on Good Morning America, World News Tonight and Nightline as well as ABC News digital.We are entering both the Nightline and GMA versions of the story. http://abcnewsvod.com.edgesuite.net/abcnews/2016/01/150319_gma_benitez_test_2500.mp4 http://abcnewsvod.com.edgesuite.net/abcnews/2015/03/150320_ntl_car_1252_2500.mp4
  • Death in the Ring

    After 24-year-old Dennis Munson Jr. of Milwaukee collapsed following his first amateur kickboxing match in March, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reporter John Diedrich got a tip and started digging into what happened. What he uncovered was a series of errors by fight officials in an unregulated bout. The ringside doctor, referee and coach in the corner all missed obvious signs that Munson was in serious trouble, according to a dozen independent experts who reviewed the fight video for the Journal Sentinel. The doctor was looking at his cell phone when he should have been monitoring the fighters. The corner man propped up Munson between rounds and slapped him in the face and was holding him by the neck and face just before he collapsed. And the referee did not intervene to assess Munson. Medical care was delayed over a disagreement on care and confusion about how to get out of the building. Emergency medical protocol was not followed. And then video of the fight, provided to police, was missing 32 seconds at a key time, just before Munson collapsed. The Journal Sentinel investigation uncovered more problems in unregulated kickboxing in Wisconsin. For instance, state regulators attended a match at a Harley-Davidson dealership — but only to oversee boxing events.
  • 40 Million Mistakes

    60 MINUTES SET-OUT TO INVESTIGATE THE CONSUMER CREDIT REPORTING INDUSTRY, A FOUR-BILLION-DOLLAR-A-YEAR INDUSTRY WHICH KEEPS FILES ON 200 MILLION AMERICANS AND TRAFFICS IN OUR FINANCIAL REPUTATIONS. THE CREDIT REPORTING AGENCIES COLLECT DATA ABOUT CONSUMERS FROM CREDIT CARD COMPANIES, BANKS, CAR DEALERSHIPS, COLLECTION AGENCIES, AND COURT RECORDS; THEY COLLATE THE DATA AND CREATE CREDIT REPORTS WHICH THEY SELL TO BUSINESSES THAT USE THE REPORTS TO JUDGE OUR CREDITWORTHINESS AND RELIABILITY. AN ERROR ON A CREDIT REPORT CAN COST CONSUMERS A LOT OF MONEY AND A LOT OF HARDSHIP; AN ERROR CAN INCREASE THE INTEREST RATE ON LOANS, PREVENT SOMEONE FROM GETTING A MORTGAGE OR BUYING A CAR, LANDING A JOB OR GAINING SECURITY CLEARANCE.
  • Cops. Cash. Cocaine.

    Rather than chase drug dealers out of town, police in the city of Sunrise invited them in. The suburban South Florida town has no great cocaine trafficking problem, but police found that selling kilos of the drug, at a discount, could make them millions. The Sun Sentinel exposed the undercover operation and provided a unique look at how far one local police department would go to use forfeiture laws to seize cash and assets from criminal suspects. Many of the deals took place in and around family restaurants, such as TGI Fridays, near the town’s main attraction, a sprawling outlet mall. Police often engineered the stings with the help of a professional lady informant. The newspaper found the city had paid her more than $800,000 over five years to target individuals and draw them into Sunrise. Cops working the stings had a financial incentive too: they made considerable overtime from forfeiture funds.
  • Pueblo halfway house

    An inmate at a halfway house in Pueblo, CO died after taking a lethal dose of Fentanyl while inside the facility and under the supervision of staff. The ambulance wasn’t called until after his death. Criminal investigations to prosecute drug dealers went cold.