Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "debate" ...

  • Uncovered: The Vaccine Debate

    In this exclusive investigation, Full Measure uncovered evidence that the federal government covered up scientific evidence and testimony that childhood vaccines can trigger autism in certain susceptible children. This evidence was made known to Department of Justice attorneys by their own scientific expert as the government fought vaccine-autism claims. The expert, Johns Hopkins pediatric neurologist Dr. Andrew Zimmerman, is one of world’s leading authorities in his field.
  • Racism in the Ranks

    The 2018 acquittal of Gerald Stanley in the death of Colten Boushie reverberated across the country. Indigenous people rallied against what they saw as an injustice. “We knew we really went back 10 years, maybe fifteen years on all the work we’ve been trying to do in this province in this country on reconciliation.” – Darlene Okemaysim-Sicotte, Advocate for Indigenous women Stanley shot and killed Boushie after the 22-year-old Cree man and friends had driven on Stanley’s farm in rural Saskatchewan. In the midst of the debate over whether the not guilty verdict was a symptom of systemic racism or support of the right to defend property, APTN Investigates video journalist Trina Roache discovered racist posts by an RCMP (ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE) officer on social media.
  • L.A. Times: How California Law Shielded Dishonest Cops

    For decades, California’s strict police privacy laws made it nearly impossible for anyone to find out basic information about police officer misconduct. A team of Los Angeles Times reporters spent months investigating the impact of this secrecy on the criminal justice system. They found that officers caught for dishonesty and other serious wrongdoing were able to continue testifying in court without prosecutors, defendants, judges and jurors ever finding out about their past. Countless defendants were convicted based on the testimony of these officers. Published at the height of a political debate over making police records public, the stories helped galvanize support to change state law and open up some records about officer misconduct, which had been kept confidential for 40 years.
  • Kaiser Health News: Unlocked and Loaded: Families Confront Guns and Dementia

    In the U.S., where gun violence kills 96 people each day, there has been vigorous debate about how to stop the carnage, including ways to prevent people with mental illness from acquiring and owning firearms. But an unacknowledged and potentially far bigger problem is what to do about the vast cache of firearms in the homes of aging Americans with dementia. Our four-month investigation, produced in partnership with PBS Newshour, shed new light on an aspect of guns and public health that no one talks about, even though it may affect millions of Americans.
  • Judicial appointment loophole sparks debate over NY constitution

    This story reveals a longtime but little-known practice of governors using a law to create one of their biggest, six-figure patronage mills to appoint appoint judges to critical courts that the constitution says are to be be presided over by elected judges.
  • Stolen Future: The Untold Story of the 2000 Election

    Investigative reporter and New York Times bestselling author Stephen Singular discovered that Florida punch cards could have been manipulated in the still highly debated 2000 presidential election. Using forensic journalism, Singular found evidence that the troubles may not have been random or accidental, as widely reported, but could have been intended to create chaos in largely Democratic and African American precincts, thereby costing Gore tens of thousands of votes. Singular examined the role of the notorious "hanging chads" — and revealed how punch cards could have been designed and targeted for specific constituencies in order to alter the outcome.
  • US Tax Havens: The new Switzerland

    Financial Times' Investigations Correspondent Kara Scannell was the first to uncover first hand accounts of how businesses exploit complex trust laws in South Dakota. Her findings, published as "US Tax Havens: The new Switzerland" uncovered a thriving onshore tax haven business. Scannell's shoe-leather reporting gave her unprecedented access to first person sources, including exclusive access to elusive business figures within the shadowy practice. Together with Vanessa Houlder, Scannell's trust law research emboldened a lively, revelatory report that contributed to the ongoing and serious debate over the use and abuse of domestic tax havens.
  • Dark Money: London's dirty secret

    ''Dark Money: London's Dirty Secret'' pierced a world that is normally hidden from all but those who enjoy great wealth or great power: the world of financial secrecy. At a moment when public debate is dominated by inequality and tax evasion, the Financial Times turned a glaring spotlight on the City of London and explained its role in a global system of illicit finance that serves the kleptocrats, criminals and the super-rich. One of the most-read stories of the year on FT.com, Dark Money was a riveting narrative that exposed a system designed to look impenetrable to outsiders. The City’s secrecy specialists spin webs of front companies, offshore accounts and dummy directors that allow tainted wealth to flow around the globe incognito. This system takes dirty money and makes it look clean. It creates a secret world whose existence is corrosive to the rest of society – a piggy bank for untouchable power.
  • Border Patrol

    We believe this is the most extensive investigation on the U.S. border conducted by a Sunday news program in 2016. We begin by revealing one of the biggest issues that’s gotten lost in the debate over illegal immigration: the disturbing increase in drug smuggling. In Border Control, we find evidence that our southern border is not under U.S. control. In Tunnel Vision, we expose some of the underground tunnels that cartels have used to smuggle drugs and people into the U.S. In Bordertown, USA, we provide an unusual profile of a U.S. border town so influenced by illegal smugglers and drugs, that the culture has worked its way into the fabric of daily life: Douglas, Arizona. In Crossing the Line, we take an eye opening look at the corruption inside U.S. Customs and Border Protection. And in Cuban Exodus, we exclusively reveal the “mind-boggling” number of Cubans surging across the Mexican border into the U.S.
  • The Final Days of Michael Kerr

    The death of inmate Michael Kerr by dehydration in 2014 ignited a barrage of activity in the state's corrections system and raised questions about prisoner treatment that reached the chambers of the North Carolina General Assembly more than a year later. Hundreds of pages of court documents pieced together the mentally ill veteran’s last hours in solitary confinement at a remote state prison, ignored and dismissed by an overworked corrections staff. http://www.wral.com/one-year-later-inmate-s-death-looms-over-prison-mental-health-debate/14506834/ http://www.wral.com/news/state/asset_gallery/14731191/