Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "degrees" ...

  • In the hot seat

    When reporters at NBC News began probing OSHA severe injury data in February 2019, an interesting takeaway emerged: UPS had a higher rate of heat injuries than any other company. At least 107 UPS workers in 23 states had been hospitalized for heat illnesses since 2015. In severe cases, heat can lead to organ failure and death. But regulators have little enforcement ability on this issue because there is no OSHA standard protecting workers from heat--even as climate change brings record-breaking temperatures. NBC News filed more than two dozen public records requests for state-level data -- to supplement the federal OSHA data -- and hundreds of pages of incident reports, and spoke with dozens of UPS employees, uncovering a corporate culture that exacerbated the problem. Long hours, heavy routes, fear of retaliation and sweltering trucks and warehouses pushed workers workers past their limits. Managers pushing workers to continue working when sick, and employees too intimidated to report their injuries. UPS claimed that their iconic brown trucks do not get dangerously hot, but NBC News sent five temperature loggers in packages across the country, during one of the hottest weeks of the summer. The results showed that each package exceeded 100 degrees while on a truck, with one hitting nearly 115 degrees. Drivers around the country also sent us images of temperature readings they took in their own trucks -- the hottest clocked in at 158 degrees. Between rising temperatures and the growing demands of the two-day delivery economy, dozens of UPS drivers said conditions are getting worse. Follow up stories uncovered additional injuries and more examples of UPS poorly protecting its workers from the heat. Following our story, OSHA fined UPS for a heat injury for the first time in nearly a decade.
  • STARZ's Fail State

    Executive produced by news legend Dan Rather, FAIL STATE investigates the dark side of American higher education, chronicling the decades of policy decisions in Washington, D.C. that have given rise to a powerful and highly-predatory for-profit college industry. With echoes of the subprime mortgage crisis, the film lays bare how for-profit colleges exploit millions of low-income and minority students, leaving them with worthless degrees and drowning in student loan debt. Combining five years of research and interviews from over 60 experts, policymakers, whistleblowers, and students defrauded by their colleges, director Alexander Shebanow presents a searing exposé on the for-profit college industry and the lawmakers enabling widespread fraud and abuse in American higher education. FAIL STATE debuted on STARZ on December 17th, 2018.
  • Chapecoense: The dark aspects of the catastrophe

    An aircraft belonging to the Bolivian company LaMia crashed into a mountain in the Department of Antioquia, Colombia, on Nov. 28, 2016, killing 71 and injuring 6 with varying degrees of severity. Almost the entire Brazilian soccer team Asociación Chapecoense de Fútbol died in the greatest aviation tragedy in the history of this sport. This is the starting point for the documentary “Chapecoense: The dark keys of the catastrophe,” a production by CNN en Español in which a team of journalists conducted a thorough investigation that spanned more than a year and 10 countries.
  • Two Degrees

    In the lead-up to the Paris climate talks in December 2015, CNN’s John Sutter led months of coverage on one number -- 2 degrees Celsius -- that is key to the planet’s future. The series looked at the scientific basis for that target, which is regarded as the threshold for “dangerous” climate change and is measured as a temperature increase since the Industrial Revolution. It also explored what happens if we cross that mark and what it really will take to avoid that level of warming. http://www.cnn.com/specials/opinions/two-degrees http://www.cnn.com/interactive/2015/06/opinions/sutter-two-degrees-marshall-islands/
  • Killed in the Line of Training

    Neal Smith had excelled at his first day in an elite firefighter training exercise. But on Day 2, trapped in a small space and weighed down by 75 pounds of gear, he became disoriented in the fog and collapsed on the second floor of the building he was making his way through. A trainer screamed at him to get up, but he couldn't. His internal temperature was 108 degrees; his brain was swelling. When Mayday was called it was too late. Rushed to a nearby hospital, the experienced firefighter died there later that day. Most people assume that all firefighters are trained by their own fire departments. But departments in small town Texas actually have been sending their personnel to the East Texas Firemen's and Fire Marshal's Association, a nonprofit trade group for volunteer firefighters. And unlike a governmental agency, there is no oversight of that group's methods or standards. As a subsequent investigation by the state fire marshal's office and by the National Institute of Safety and Health revealed the training camp was so poorly run that several other firefighters had dropped out (saying they didn't want to risk their lives), passed out or been taken to the hospital. Had safety procedures standard in most fire departments been in place – such as a simple tub of ice – Smith could have been saved at the training camp site.
  • Profiting Off the GI Bill

    “Profiting off the GI Bill” exposed how the landmark education benefit for Iraq and Afghanistan veterans had been stolen by for-profit schools that had received billions of dollars in taxpayer subsidies, despite leaving veterans with worthless degrees and few job prospects.
  • Three Degrees of Separation

    In the Texas foster care system about 90 percent of all children are placed in homes via private child placement agencies, making it very easy for the state, the brokering agency and the foster parents to avoid blame when something goes wrong with a child.
  • Soldiers At Risk: Iraq Water Investigation

    With temperatures rising up to “130 degrees or more” a day, why would the military be rationing water to only 2 liters a day per person? The answer is a water shortage. As a result, some soldiers are reporting from “serious physical problems with their kidneys, nerve degeneration, and even serious brain damage”. Further, some of these conditions went on for up to a year.
  • "Breach of Trust"

    Soldiers on all levels of the U.S. Armed Forces used fake college diplomas to increase chances of "promotions and pay raises." WHNT-TV revealed that several AMCOM employees had also presented "fake degrees" to the "Department of the Army." The investigation spurred a reconstruction of HR Specialist training, as the command's "ability to detect" to false diplomas was severely flawed.
  • NJ Educators free to use Diploma Mills

    Top school officials and superintendents exploited state law to receive degrees from phony diploma mills. Taxpayers spent tens of thousands in bonuses until their actions were uncovered.dd