Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "delay" ...

  • A Dangerous Delay

    In November 2018, Olivia Paregol’s father frantically called the University of Maryland from the intensive care unit at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The 18-year-old freshman, who had lived in a mold-infested dorm, was fighting for her life and doctors couldn’t figure out what was wrong. Was there anything else on campus making students sick? The director of the student health center knew of severe cases of adenovirus on campus but the public had no clue. Less than a week later, Olivia was dead from the virus and the outbreak would sicken dozens of students. It was only after her death that school officials informed the campus about the virus. Ian Paregol had more questions than answers: How long had the university known? Why didn’t they tell Olivia or other students when they showed up sick at the student health center? Washington Post reporters Jenn Abelson, Amy Brittain and Sarah Larimer interviewed more than 100 people and obtained thousands of pages of medical records, hundreds of emails, text messages, voicemails and other documents to reconstruct the events that led to Olivia’s death and threatened the health and safety of thousands of students at the University of Maryland campus. College officials said it would cost $63,000 to disclose internal emails about the outbreak, so reporters obtained many of those records from state and county agencies. In May, the Washington Post published “A Dangerous Delay,” a detailed investigation examining the outbreak of mold and adenovirus at the University of Maryland. The reporters revealed that the school waited 18 days to inform students about the virus and officials discussed — but decided against — notifying students with compromised immune systems, like Olivia, and those living in mold-infested dorms.
  • In the Dark

    “In the Dark” was a narrative investigative series, providing the anatomy of the faulty police investigation into the 1994 slayings of a young mother and her toddler son, Stacy Falcon Dewey and Jacob Dewey. The investigation allowed the truth to slip through the cracks despite DNA evidence that had linked a convicted murderer to the crime scene. The story uncovered emails and other records that showed how neglect and indifference by forensics examiners and prosecutors delayed the case, leaving the victims’ unwitting family to suffer for years without answers.
  • ’Drag this out’: Atlanta mayor’s office directs delay of public requests

    In a unique partnership, WSB-TV joined resources with investigative journalists at The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Reporters, producers and editors crafted stories for the needs of their audiences and platforms but broke them in tandem. Management from both media outlets collaborated to make a formal complaint with the state after reporting on city officials frustrating Georgia’s Open Records Act. WSB-TV and The Atlanta Journal-Constitution are both owned by parent company Cox Media Group
  • WKMG News 6 Gets Results for Drivers during SunPass Upgrade Meltdown

    In June of 2018, The Florida Department of Transportation and its state vendor, Conduent, underwent a massive upgrade to the state’s tolling system known as Sunpass. It failed miserably, causing the SunPass computer system to crash and led the entire billing process into turmoil. For more than 2 months, drivers were not billed for their toll charges, leading to a backlog of nearly 330 million transactions. That created a consumer nightmare, with customers dealing with a deluge of backlogged tolls, computer glitches, duplicate billing, questionable and erroneous toll charges, and long wait times for help both on the phone and in person. WKMG News 6 kept viewers informed on every problem, every development, and even offered solutions and an interactive tutorial on how to check their accounts for duplicate or erroneous toll charges. We also created a timeline of events, exposed when the SunPass Website failed to allow customers to turn off auto-pay online, had the wrong date and time stamp on millions of toll transactions, and delayed sending out toll by plate invoices due to continued issues with toll data accuracy.
  • WCPO: DNA Delay

    A tip from a rape victim leads WCPO Investigative Reporter Hillary Lake to uncover a DNA testing delay at the Kentucky State Crime Lab affecting thousands of new criminal cases, from assaults to rapes to murders, waiting on results to move forward in the justice system. The investigation leads to action from the Kentucky attorney general.
  • WBTV Investigates: Hurricane Recovery Delays

    Two hurricanes devastated parts of eastern North Carolina two years apart: Hurricane Matthew in 2016 and Hurricane Florence in 2018. Despite the gap, the state had made little progress in helping victims of Hurricane Matthew get back in their owns by the time Florence hit. For the past year, we've uncovered problem after problem with the state's efforts to administer hundreds of millions of dollars in federal disaster aid. Our work has prompted multiple legislative hearings; the creation of a legislative investigative committee and the formation of a new state disaster recovery office.
  • The Virginian-Pilot: Jailed in Crisis

    In a first-of-it’s-kind investigation, the Virginian-Pilot tracked down more than 400 cases across the country in which people with mental illness died in jails, documenting the scope of a tragedy that’s been unfolding for decades: too many people are being jailed instead of treated and many are dying in horrific ways and under preventable circumstances. The series goes on to detail how so many people ended up in jails because of a lack of mental health services and how some municipalities are finding ways to get them into treatment. The investigation prompted long-delayed action by the U.S. Justice Department to address the conditions for people with mental illness in the Hampton Roads Regional Jail in Portsmouth, Virginia.
  • The Daily News: Yellow School Bus Crisis

    This Daily News series dealt with yellow school buses and a crisis that included extensive delays, fraud in hiring bus staffers with criminal pasts, and how bus contracts were awarded.
  • Texas Observer: Access Denied

    The Texas Public Information Act is under attack. The law, which ensures the public’s access to government records, has taken a beating from state Supreme Court jurists, lawmakers and state agencies since it was passed in 1973. Once a shining example of government transparency, the law has been eroded by a growing list of loopholes for everything from ongoing police investigations and the dates of birth of government employees to information related to executions. Journalists are well aware of this problem, but it had never been presented to the public in a deep-dive feature until now. “Access Denied” reveals that government officials can delay, derail and deny requests by slow-walking them or charging exorbitant fees. This piece was reported over six months and included interviews with dozens of government officials, investigative journalists, citizen activists and researchers.
  • National Observer: First Nations and the Trans Mountain Pipeline

    National Observer’s reporting revealed how the Canadian government made a politically-motivated decision to approve a major west-coast pipeline expansion project, knowingly violating its legal duty to consult affected Indigenous communities. The reporting has contributed to significant delays in the project, followed by the withdrawal of energy company Kinder Morgan, and a government takeover of the project. The reporting has largely left the project in limbo, and will force federal officials to improve its efforts to accommodate First Nations if it wants to proceed with the pipeline expansion. Meanwhile, a key federal cabinet minister has been reassigned and oil companies have scaled back plans to expand production in Alberta either directly or indirectly related to the investigation by National Observer.