Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "demolition" ...

  • Saving Mes Aynak

    "Saving Mes Aynak" follows Afghan archaeologist Qadir Temori as he races against time to save a 5,000-year-old archaeological site in Afghanistan from imminent demolition. A Chinese state-owned mining company is closing in on the ancient site, eager to harvest $100 billion dollars worth of copper buried directly beneath the archaeological ruins. Only 10% of Mes Aynak has been excavated, though, and some believe future discoveries at the site have the potential to redefine the history of Afghanistan and the history of Buddhism itself. Qadir Temori and his fellow Afghan archaeologists face what seems an impossible battle against the Chinese, the Taliban and local politics to save their cultural heritage from likely erasure. https://vimeo.com/158548175 Password: KTQprivate
  • Lax building inspections, lurking danger

    When a building collapsed in Center City Philadelphia, killing six people and injuring 13, attention quickly focused on the reckless demolition contractor who cut corners in taking down the building. Then it shifted to the city agency charged with overseeing demolitions and ensuring safety. Chagrined city officials pledged safety reforms and stepped up enforcement. An Inquirer investigation revealed just how empty those promises were and documented dangerous conditions in buildings across the city.
  • Live Wires

    The city of Milwaukee decided to hire a company to demolish condemned garages. On the surface this sounded like a win and positive outcome for the neighborhoods. But the I-Team discovered what this company left behind, live exposed electrical wires, posed a greater risk than the boarded up garages. Our investigation found this company left exposed electrical wires behind at more than a dozen demolished garages for any child or person to touch and possible die. We took our concerns directly to the city which prompted them to check the garages torn down by this company from several months. We raised questions about the city’s check and balance policy and how such a serious threat could go unnoticed for so long. A code enforcement officer was supposes to check each work site but our investigation found that did not take place. It forced the city to fix the problem and change policy in light of our investigation. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wT8JjLs16Rg
  • Detroit's Foreclosure Meltdown

    This series investigated the impact of a decade of mortgage foreclosures on Detroit neighborhoods by tracking the fate of nearly 65,000 bank foreclosed homes. We found that subprime lending and bargain-basement sales of these homes contributed to a $500 million loss for the city in unpaid property taxes and demolition costs. http://www.detroitnews.com/topic/046a3a7c-ed6d-4afb-876a-d7800dd4a513/detroits-foreclosure-meltdown/
  • Unsettling Dust

    The series examined Oregon’s failure to protect workers and the public from breathing airborne asbestos fibers during or after building demolitions. The stories found that hundreds of Portland, Oregon homes had been demolished with asbestos in place, creating a cancer risk to anybody who might have breathed airborne asbestos as a result. A Washington region with stricter reporting requirements had a significantly higher compliance rate, we found. The investigation also found that Oregon is the only state failing to meet federal notification standards necessary to prevent contractors from doing large-scale demolitions without first removing asbestos.
  • Detroit's foreclosure meltdown

    This series investigated the impact of a decade of mortgage foreclosures on Detroit neighborhoods by tracking the fate of nearly 65,000 bank foreclosed homes. We found that subprime lending and bargain-basement sales of these homes contributed to a $500 million loss for the city in unpaid property taxes and demolition costs.
  • Detroit lags on vacant house demolitions

    The author investigated the Wayne County Medical Examiner's office and the mayor's office to see how well they were keeping up their promise to demolish vacant homes in the city.
  • Tons of Questions

    After wildfires destroyed 365 homes in San Diego, the city rushed to enter contracts with two companies to haul away mounds of potentially toxic debris. The Union-Tribune investigated and found that the contractors, A.J. Diani Construction C. of Santa Maria and Watsonville-based Granite Construction Co., claimed to haul far more rubble than privately hired companies did from comparable lots, failed to provide accurate documentation of how many tons they removed and billed the city millions more than stated in their contracts.
  • NOAH Housing Program Investigation

    WWL-TV's 50 part investigation into a non-profit City of New Orleans agency revealed a post-Hurricane Katrina house gutting program designed for the poor and elderly may have been a scheme to funnel money to contractors. The investigation showed homes the non-profit claimed to have gutted using federal dollars, but the work was never done. Through extensive research, the WWL-TV team also found significant links between the highest paid contractors and the executive director of the non-profit. And one contractor was even linked to the city's mayor, Ray Nagin.
  • Collapse

    This series offers a look into how the buildings of Baltimore are collapsing one at a time. This has happened so frequently that the newspapers don't even bother to report the accidents.