Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "depression" ...

  • Lasting Scars

    Prisoners waterboarded and tortured by the U.S. suffered enduring wounds — flashbacks, nightmares, depression, headaches — without ever being properly treated.
  • Solitary Lives: An investigation into the secret world of solitary confinement

    In prison cells across North Carolina, government officials are meting out punishment that human rights experts say amounts to torture. For more than 13 years, the state kept inmate Jason Swain in solitary confinement - a punishment that research shows often causes and exacerbates mental illness. Swain, who suffers from bipolar depression, repeatedly swallowed razors and ripped open his surgical incisions. The Observer found he was just one of seven N.C. inmates who had spent more than a decade in solitary. Even 16-year-olds are confined to solitary in North Carolina - before they’re convicted of crimes.
  • Tucson ministry a cult, former followers say

    An investigation by Arizona Daily Star reporters Carol Ann Alaimo and Emily Bregel revealed that a local ministry, Faith Christian Church, had for decades been aggressively recruiting members on the University of Arizona’s campus, leaving in its wake a trail of traumatized former members who describe the church as a cult. Their stories — told independently over weeks of reporting — were remarkably similar. They included reports of hitting infants who exhibit a “rebellious spirit,” financial coercion, alienation from parents, public shaming of members and shunning of those who leave the church or question its leaders. After leaving, some say they spent years in therapy for panic attacks, depression, flashbacks and other symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder.
  • Ghost Panels

    The VA continues to struggle to deliver timely, quality, healthcare to veterans despite the publicity and subsequent reforms initiated by the 2014 scandal. Case in point:The VA medical system in St. Cloud, Minnesota. It's where 30 year old Ross Cameron bounced from one physician to another as he desperately tried to get help for a deep depression and PTSD. He wife says he never got the full attention he needed. Then one day he took his own life by driving into a tree at a hundred miles an hour. The St. Cloud VA is also where Doug Larson nearly died because a provider made a huge mistake. This series of reports documents the turmoil within the hospital which triggered an exodus of physicians and nurses, and the impact the staffing shortages are having on veterans healthcare.
  • Paid a pittance

    This investigation was the first comprehensive analysis of Pennsylvania's use of a Depression-Era provision that allows workers with disabilities to be paid below minimum wage.
  • New York's Finest First Responders

    The First Responders that unhesitatingly dealt with the immediate aftermath of the 911 attacks on New York City discovered, to their dismay, that they too became victims of the Terrorist Attack. Exposure to asbestos and other harmful materials while working on the disaster has caused hundreds of New York's Finest First Responders to face respiratory illnesses including a variety of cancers, as well as depression and PTSD. The Insider Exclusive-New York's Finest First Responders details how the legal team at Sullivan Papain worked tirelessly, and without pay to help create the September 11th Victim Compensation Fund in Congress, and then continued their involvement to make it work. As Stephen Cassidy, President of New York's Uniformed Firefighters association said, the team at Sullivan Papain, .. “went well beyond assisting in the creation of the VCF Fund, as they then willingly and successfully undertook, for absolutely no fee, the representation of 362 injured firefighters and families of deceased firefighters who applied to the Fund" and “As a result of their tireless efforts and dedication, Sullivan Papain has recovered over $260 Million from the Fund for injured firefighters and families of fallen firefighters…. all while foregoing millions of dollars in legal fees”
  • Fields of Fraud

    The most sweeping proposed reform of U.S. agricultural assistance since the Great Depression would replace most direct payments to farmers with federally-backed crop insurance—a change that is designed to save money. But this CNBC investigation finds the change could open the door to massive fraud. http://video.cnbc.com/gallery/?video=3000097737&play=1
  • The Return

    The first hand account of Russia's transition from communism since 1985 involved detailed reporting and analysis spanning a period of more than two decades. Major findings include the sources of President, and then Prime Minister, Vladimir Putin's popularity and reasons for Russia's descent into economic depression in the 1990s and recovery after 1999.
  • Crazy Like Us

    The book examines depression, post traumatic stress disorder and eating disorders in the U.S.
  • Medicating the Military

    The stories looked at the nature and scope of the use of prescription drugs in the military community, with a focus on psychiatric medications and painkillers. The reporting found that use of psychiatric medications has risen dramatically in the past several years and some doctors suggest it may be a factor in the military's suicide epidemic of recent years. Reporters found that many psychiatric drugs - including powerful anti-convulsants and anti-psychotic medications - were being used "off label", or in ways not formally approved by the FDA. Reporters found that many troops were taking up to 10 medications at a time in so-called drug cocktails that experts say are untested and unproven in these combinations. Reporters also found that deaths caused by accidental drug overdoses had tripled during the past several years and that the Army's specialty care units were quietly conducting internal investigations and making significant changes to hospital protocols to reduce risk of accidental deaths. Finally, they found that psychiatric drug usage was also up significantly among military children.