Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "displaced" ...

  • How America’s College-Closure Crisis Leaves Families Devastated

    After a chain of for-profit colleges abruptly closed, The Chronicle of Higher Education conducted an in-depth analysis of federal data related to closures. The analysis, which required extensive data work, showed that more than 1,200 college campuses closed in the last five years – an average of 20 closures per month. These closures displaced roughly 500,000 students, most of whom were working adults. The data showed that most of these displaced students were at least 25 years old, and about 57 percent are racial minorities. The vast majority of displaced students – nearly 85 percent – attended a for-profit college. The for-profit industry has received scant oversight from the Trump administration, despite the industry’s long history of problems. The Chronicle’s investigation highlighted the need for greater oversight of this troubled sector of higher education.
  • Boston Globe: Lawrence Gas Explosions

    After the Merrimack Valley region of Massachusetts was rocked on Sept. 13, 2018, by natural gas explosions that killed one young man, displaced thousands of residents, and cut off heat and power to homes and businesses for three months, the Boston Globe responded with dozens of daily stories as well as a steady stream of investigative pieces, attempting to tell readers exactly what had happened and why -- and whether the officials working to set things right were up to the task. Here are five early examples of investigative work connected to the disaster.
  • Next Time They’ll Come to Count the Dead: War and Survival in South Sudan

    For six weeks in the Spring of 2015, award-winning journalist Nick Turse traveled on foot as well as by car, SUV, and helicopter around war-torn South Sudan talking to military officers and child soldiers, United Nations officials and humanitarian workers, civil servants, civil society activists, and internally displaced persons–people whose lives had been blown apart by a ceaseless conflict there. In fast-paced and dramatic fashion, Turse reveals the harsh reality of modern warfare in the developing world and the ways people manage to survive the unimaginable.
  • Firestone and the Warlord

    "Firestone and the Warlord" investigates the secret relationship between the American tire company Firestone and the infamous Liberian warlord Charles Taylor. The multiplatform investigation is a revelatory window into how Firestone conducted business during the brutal Liberian civil war, drawing on previously unreported diplomatic cables, court documents, and inside accounts from Americans who helped run the company's rubber plantation as Liberia descended into chaos. The Liberian civil war resulted in the deaths of more than 200,000 people. Half the country’s population was displaced. Taylor later became the first person convicted of crimes against humanity since the Nazi era. Through most of the conflict, Firestone continued to export rubber to the United States and elsewhere to produce tires, condoms and medical supplies.
  • Mexodus

    The story provides an in depth look at the violence-driven exodus of the Mexican professionals, businessmen and middle class families to the U.S. and safer parts of Mexico. Major findings include sourcing of estimates of those displaced by the violence.
  • Back to the Fray: Displaced by Mergers, Some Bankers Launch Their Own Start-Ups

    The Wall Street Journal tells the story of Steve Aaron, a former bank executive entering the banking business himself. "As giant bank gobbles up giant bank, they are leaving behind crumbs. All over the country but especially in the South, experienced but displaced bankers such as Mr. Aaron are scrambling to reassemble the pieces -- capital, managers, and even buildings and equipment -- back into new, tiny banks."
  • Locked Out; Broken Homes

    Shalhoup reports on how the renovation of eight public housing complexes "drifted off course - barring hundreds of poor families from decent housing and making room for middle-class tenants who pay full rent." The second story shows the fate of the displaced poor families, who received vouchers for reduced rent, and ended up in living in substandard buildings. The "negligence resulted in 50 families falling ill in one Section 8 apartment complex, due to a severe mold infection."
  • Living High off Public Housing

    The San Francisco Bay Guardian reports that "The San Francisco Housing Authority had no money to help displaced residents - but plenty for a sole-source contract with a Chicago consultant... In many ways, the contracts are a case study in the problems of the administration of Mayor Willie Brown and the contracting practices that have FBI agents crawling all over city hall."
  • Battling for Business

    Ohio municipalities have the authority to cut corporate property taxes to encourage industrial job creation and development, an incentive Lake County has used aggressively. The relocations have displaced hundreds of local jobs, about one for every three they've reportedly created, according to an analysis of county data. Further investigation showed that even jobs reportedly "created" are sometimes transferred from other places. This five-part series examines the issue.