Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "drivers" ...

  • Black drivers bear brunt of citations from routine stops by St. Anthony PD

    After the fatal police shooting of Philando Castile during a traffic stop in a St. Paul suburb, MPR News set out to investigate whether black drivers were disproportionately stopped by the law enforcement agency involved with Castile’s death. MPR analyzed thousands of traffic citations in a five-year period from the St. Anthony police department and focused our investigation on stops in which police had the most discretion to pull someone over. They expected to see some level of racial disparity, but the results were staggering.
  • Pennsylvania Turnpike investigation

    WTAE TV revealed waste, mismanagement and conflicts of interest at the Pennsylvania Turnpike. Emails showed turnpike officials congratulating themselves for their response to a storm that left more than 500 drivers stranded for more than 20 hours. Records revealed turnpike commissioners getting take-home cars even though they meet only once a month. Documents showed a turnpike commissioner cutting personal business deals with turnpike vendors. All this occurred as the turnpike hiked tolls and cut back on projects to deal with a financial crisis.
  • Unprotected

    An NBC 5 investigation found the Texas Department of Transportation failed to put up guardrails in locations where state and federal guidelines suggest they should have been installed. In some of those spots with no guardrails drivers have died after colliding with large concrete bridge posts that sit unprotected, some just feet from the roadway.
  • Rail Crossings Danger

    A CBC News investigation into Canada's top 25 most accident-prone railway crossings found wide-spread design flaws across the country. Some of the most dangerous railway crossings in Canada lack automated gate arms, protective pedestrian gates, advance warning signs, bells and flashing lights. Other deficiencies include poor sightlines for drivers, confusing road signs and overgrown bush. As well, CBC News learned Transport Canada does not routinely warn the public about all railway crossings that appear in its database of the country's 500 "highest risk" crossings.
  • Hidden Dangers on America's Roads

    “Hidden Dangers on America’s Roads” is a compilation of CBS News investigations revealing lax government regulation and the unwillingness of automakers to address potentially fatal issues in transportation safety. Those issues include vehicle defects, outdated federal automotive safety standards and policies surrounding the medical qualifications, or lack thereof, of commercial interstate drivers. These stories exposed weaknesses that inspired members of Congress to push for an upgrade of federal motor vehicle safety standards, forced the National Highway Traffic Safety administration to launch programs to identify potential changes to standards and led to a recall of more than a million vehicles worldwide.
  • WDSU Investigates: Parking Ticket Turmoil

    "WDSU Investigates: Parking Ticket Turmoil" is an in-depth six-month investigation into erroneously issued parking tickets by the city of New Orleans. WDSU’s investigation spurred a probe by the city’s Inspector General. In the months following, it was discovered that nearly 7,000 parking citations were improperly issued, potentially costing drivers hundreds of thousands of dollars in false payments.
  • Free to Flee

    In Florida, drunk drivers are routinely not arrested immediately after they cause a fatal crash, even when there’s sufficient probable cause to arrest them. In many cases, the drivers remain free as the investigations drag on for many months, well beyond accepted standards. Our investigation found that dozens of drunk drivers have escaped justice and hundreds more were left on the streets for years before being arrested and convicted, with some committing other crimes while they enjoyed their freedom.
  • Police & Race Relations

    This story delves into police and racial profiling in Amarillo. ABC 7 analyzed all traffic stops from 2015 that resulted in a warning or citation by race. We found that blacks had 10 percent of the traffic stops but made up seven percent of the Amarillo population. Hispanics had 40 percent of the traffic stops but make up 29 percent of the population. This story also looks at why the data might not tell the full story. People self-select their race on their driver’s license and the Census, but officers select a driver’s race during a traffic stop. There is also an issue in data collection because “Hispanic” didn’t become a race option for driver’s licenses until 2013. Previously, Hispanics had to select to be Black or White. Because not all licenses are updated but police must report the number of Hispanic drivers stopped each year, officers have to determine a driver’s race.
  • King County Metro’s Bathroom Reform: Constipated or Incompetent?

    Following a six-month state investigation that concluded King County Metropolitan Transit was not providing bathrooms bus drivers could reach during their breaks, the transit agency made several promises. They included cleaning a troublesome portable at the end of the No. 36 -- its busiest route -- three times weekly, creating a new email address and phone line for operators to report problems, and assigning a staff member to respond to operators’ complaints. Metro broke all of those promises. As a result, a new portable at the end of that No. 36 line overflowed with human waste, making it unusable for more than two weeks.
  • Metro buses: Pedestrians in a blind spot?

    King County Metropolitan Transit District bus collisions with pedestrians grew substantially after schedules were tightened and drivers had less time to recover between trips. Collisions with walkers leaped 35 percent in the past four-plus years. And a group of accidents was disturbingly similar: A Metro bus manufactured by Orion turning left hit a pedestrian in a crosswalk. That model bus has a large pillar on the left-hand side of the windshield, making it difficult for the driver to see walkers while turning.