Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "dust" ...

  • Arizona Republic: The Charter Gamble

    Reporting by Craig Harris, starting in the spring, revealed one questionable deal after another with Arizona charter schools, as his reporting detailed how the industry had created millionaires through insider deals. By the time lawmakers were calling for reforms, The Arizona Republic built a team to take the next big bite. The deep dive by Harris, along with Anne Ryman, Justin Price and Alden Woods, spun out a five-part series that told the story of Arizona’s charter schools from inception to present day.
  • 60 Minutes: The Spotted Pig

    Anderson Cooper speaks to restaurant workers who say they were sexually harassed or assaulted at the stylish New York eatery called "The Spotted Pig." At the heart of the accusations are the restaurant's owner Ken Friedman and celebrity Chef Mario Batali.
  • 60 Minutes: Flying Under the Radar

    On April 15th 2018, CBS News 60 MINUTES featured a two-part investigation into the safety record of one of the country’s most profitable airlines, Allegiant Air, a small, ultra-low-cost carrier based in Las Vegas. Over the course of seven months, correspondent Steve Kroft and his producers analyzed hundreds of federal aviation documents and interviewed pilots, mechanics and industry experts for a report that raised disturbing questions about the safety of Allegiant’s fleet. Although Allegiant flies less than 100 planes, our investigation found that over a 20-month period, the airline experienced over 100 serious mechanical problems, including mid-air engine failures, cabin depressurization, smoke in the cabin, flight control malfunctions, hydraulic leaks and aborted take-offs. The incidents forced Allegiant pilots to declare 46 in-flight emergencies and 60 unscheduled landings. Our expert sources said this was a remarkably high number of incidents for an airline this size.
  • #MeToo Unmasks the Open Secret of Sexual Abuse in Yoga

    A KQED callout for #MeToo accounts in the Bay Area yoga world and our ensuing nine-month investigation revealed a range of allegations by seven women against five teachers: from inappropriate massage to a violating touch in class, from drugging to sex with a minor. I found that the yoga community is struggling to rein in this sexual misconduct and abuse in its ranks. Some experts believe the lack of oversight of teachers and schools is adding to the problems of an industry experiencing explosive growth, where touch and trust are a fundamental part of the practice.
  • Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup

    In 2014, Theranos founder and CEO Elizabeth Holmes was widely seen as the female Steve Jobs: a brilliant Stanford dropout whose startup "unicorn" promised to revolutionize the medical industry with a machine that would make blood testing significantly faster and easier. Backed by investors such as Larry Ellison and Tim Draper, Theranos sold shares in a fundraising round that valued the company at more than $9 billion, putting Holmes's worth at an estimated $4.7 billion. There was just one problem: The technology didn't work. A riveting story of the biggest corporate fraud since Enron, a tale of ambition and hubris set amid the bold promises of Silicon Valley.
  • Coal's Deadly Dust

    This NPR/Frontline investigation of an epidemic of a fatal lung disease affecting more than 2,000 coal miners used 30 years of government data and internal agency memos to show that federal agency officials knew more than 20 years ago that coal miners were exposed to toxic silica dust, and were suffering severe lung disease, but did not act then or since to directly address silica exposure in coal mines.
  • Oil Empire

    As Texas' oil production has boomed and the Craddick family's oil wealth has increased, so has their political clout. When Christi Craddick assumed elected office as that industry's top regulator in 2013, it ensured the Craddick name would be one of the most powerful and widely-renowned in the state's history. KXAN discovered, since the start of 2014, Craddick voted at least 320 times on agenda items brought by companies that pay her and her family royalties or dividends, according to her personal financial disclosures. We also found she cast more than 100 votes on enforcement actions against those companies.
  • Insult to Injury

    As Tesla races to revolutionize the automobile industry and build a more sustainable future, it has left its factory workers in the past, still painfully vulnerable to the dangers of manufacturing. Our reporting shows that Tesla prioritized speed over safety, ignored its own safety experts and denied proper medical care to injured workers. And in order to make its safety record look better than it really is, Tesla has kept injuries off the books. Our radio segments take listeners into the factory and behind the scenes, as whistleblowers tell their secrets and workers show the toll on their lives.
  • Cosecha de Miseria (Harvest of Misery)

    A yearlong investigation by Telemundo and The Weather Channel gathered evidence that child labor is commonplace during the coffee harvest in Chiapas, the poorest state in Mexico -- illustrating in stark, human terms the failures and limitations of an elaborate global system of third-party monitoring established by the coffee industry to assure its sourcing is ethical, and a violation of international agreements and laws meant to prohibit child labor. By following the supply chain to the source, the investigation also revealed how global agreements and the laws of nations prohibit such labors by children, who were found filling and lugging heavy bags of coffee while living in harsh conditions. Result: A documentary in which reporters take viewers on a gritty, real-world tour to the bottom of the murky coffee supply chain, where feel-good marketing clashes with harsh realities socially conscious consumers may find surprising if not shocking.
  • Coal Uncovered

    "Coal Uncovered" is a two-part local news investigation into the coal handling industry on the Mobile River, and its effects on the citizens living in downtown Mobile, Ala. Folks living in the area worry their health is at risk due to the consistent build-up of what appears to be coal dust on their homes. FOX10 News hired an independent laboratory to test dust samples taken from five locations across downtown, to see if coal dust was indeed the culprit. The test results revealed every sample contained significant percentages of coal dust, validating the concerns of the residential community. Further, this investigation exposes a caught-on-camera phone call made by a tax-dollar paid coal industry leader, allowing FOX10 News to inform the public about what really goes on behind industry lines. This investigation exposes the effects of a powerful industry in Mobile, of which residents and school children are withstanding every day. It holds tax-dollar funded agencies accountable, and gives a voice to the people of downtown Mobile, whose complaints and concerns have long been ignored.