Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "economics" ...

  • Bled Dry

    When local hospitals shut their doors, communities usually blame poor economics or heavy regulation. But The Dallas Morning News found another reason for closures: Businessmen who bought ailing hospitals and siphoned off their cash, often leaving them vacant hulks in devastated towns. What may seem at first to be an unlikely scenario has played out not just in Texas, but across the country. One owner left a trail of 13 wrecked hospitals in seven states. In Nevada, a doctor who put down $10,000 to take over the only hospital between Reno and Las Vegas pulled out at least $8 million before the cash-starved medical center shut down. Federal regulators and most states don’t vet people who take over hospitals, The News discovered, and there is little financial oversight. Even when patient care suffers at these stripped facilities, regulators seldom hold those who profited accountable.
  • Broadband Inequality

    The Center for Public Integrity combined large datasets to measure in hard numbers who doesn’t have access to high-speed internet and for the first time illuminate the issue through a socioeconomic lens. The Center found that people living in areas in the lowest quintile of median household income were nearly five times more likely not to have access to broadband than those living in areas in the top quintile. This analysis had never been done before.
  • Q1 GDP Mystery

    In a series of print and video pieces for CNBC, Senior Economics Reporter Steve Liesman discovered longstanding issues in the government’s reporting of first quarter GDP growth, prompting responses from the Bureau of Economic Analysis, professional economists, and Federal Reserve officials. http://video.cnbc.com/gallery/?video=3000380822 http://www.cnbc.com/2015/04/21/the-mysterious-case-of-weak-1q-gdp-for-30-years.html
  • Downtown Reno blight

    Downtown Reno, Nev. was devastated by the recession and though the recession is considered over, much of the city's core remains vacant and blighted. A three-part series - preview video, call to action and investigative piece - published throughout a week in November addressing the issue of downtown blight. http://www.rgj.com/videos/news/2015/11/16/75602720/ http://www.rgj.com/story/news/2015/11/19/why-so-long-clean-up-downtown-reno-blight/75627500/ http://www.rgj.com/story/news/2015/11/17/how-fight-blight-reno/74288332/
  • Poor Health An occasional series about the barriers to health and health care for low-income urban Americans

    Poor Health was the result of a collaboration between the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel and faculty and students from Marquette University. Both papers published the series, which had three major parts. The backbone of the series is a set of interactive maps that shows that health care systems have closed hospitals in poor communities in the major U.S. metropolitan areas while opening new facilities in more affluent areas, often communities that already had hospitals; that the residents of the communities in which hospitals closed were less healthy than their more affluent counterparts, and that communities in which hospitals closed were much more likely to be federally designated "physician shortage areas." than communities that retained or gained hospitals. In addition, reporting in several cities shows the health care challenges among the urban poor, the results of those difficulties and the economics that drive the unequal distribution of health care. The final part of the series focuses on solutions. A major story on the effort in Oregon to improve health care for Medicaid recipients while lowering costs is the centerpiece; other reporting on innovative approaches to health care in poor areas includes programs in Philadelphia, Cleveland and Indianapolis.
  • Forgotten South Carolina

    The series took an in-depth look at the deep disparities in education, health and economic opportunity that hinder South Carolina’s ability to progress. The series investigated what it is about the state that perpetuates those disparities.
  • For The Record: Unrestricted Warfare

    For The Record investigated whether the 2008 U.S. financial crisis may have been caused at least in part by economic terrorism – the intentional infliction of economic damage on U.S. markets. The theory was investigated by a report commissioned by the Pentagon, which the Defense Department later sought to marginalize. For The Record spoke with former high-level Pentagon officials who said that the report was quashed because it didn’t “fit the narrative” being pushed at the time.
  • The Betrayal of the American Dream

    The Betrayal of the American Dream tells the story of how the American middle class has been systematically impoverished and its future threatened by public policymakers and the nation’s economic elite.
  • Secrecy for Sale: Inside the Global Offshore Money Maze (Offshore Leaks)

    Secrecy for Sale made front page news around the globe, including in the U.K., the United States, Switzerland, Germany, France, China, and Russia. Also known as the “Offshore Leaks” investigation, it sparked official investigations around Europe, Asia, Australia, and in North and South America, and several high-profile resignations. It prompted the French president to call for the eradication of tax havens, the UK prime minister to announce—alongside the U.S. President—that the two nations had agreed to “tackle the scourge of tax havens,” and EU officials to say it “transformed” tax politics in Europe. The International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, a project of the Center for Public Integrity, struck a blow for transparency against one of the world’s most important and contentious public issues—tax havens and the illicit flow of money around the globe.
  • WAMU: Inside The Collapse

    It's October 2008: major banks are failing, Congress is bailing them out with taxpayer dollars. The public deserves to know how we got into the mess. ABC News Nightline's "Inside the Collapse" was first to expose a top-down, company-wide reckless lending strategy that led to the biggest bank failure in U.S. history: Washington Mutual Bank. Senior Justice Correspondent Pierre Thomas got inside Washington Mutual's culture and uncovered what really went wrong using original reporting, an exclusive whistleblower interview, a video of a jubilant company party, exclusive internal company documents, former employee interviews and victim interviews. His piece, as well as a follow-up on World news with Charles Gibson and articles on ABCNews.com, caught the attention of law enforcement. Two days after the piece aired, federal prosecutors announced that because of "intense public interest" they were investigating the bank's activities with assistance from the FBI, FDIC, SEC and IRS. The story was widely reported in the national media in the following weeks.