Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "emergency" ...

  • KARE 11 Investigates: “A Pattern of Denial”

    KARE 11’s two-year investigation exposed a systemic nationwide pattern of veterans having their emergency medical bills improperly denied and often turned over to collection agencies. VA whistleblowers revealed to KARE that government quotas for processing claims – and a computer system that made it easier to deny claims than to approve them – were to blame for many denials. The improper denials could total billions of dollars.
  • Deadly Delay: Tampa's Broken Ambulance System

    An ambulance responding to a heart attack call broke down, costing the patient valuable time that could have saved his life. The ABC Action News I-Team found out that ambulance was old, was unreliable and, unfortunately, was typical of Tampa's advanced life support ambulance fleet. We discovered the city spent millions of new parks from the same fund which could have replaced aging ambulances, which put lives at risk.
  • Boston Globe: Losing Laura

    The needless death of a journalist’s wife from an asthma attack outside a locked hospital door revealed stunning weakness in Massachusetts’ emergency response system, sending the widowed journalist on a painful quest to document everything that went wrong and why Laura’s caregivers didn’t tell him the truth — a quest that changed the way the state’s 911 operators are trained to take emergency calls.
  • Hollow Columns

    At least 22 highway bridges in Washington state sit on hollow concrete columns that are at risk of instantaneous implosion in a major earthquake. The state doesn’t know how to fix them. In addition, the state knows of 474 bridges that are at risk of crumbling in a big quake. The state has insufficient funds to fix them. Highways that are part of the Puget Sound region’s “seismic lifeline” emergency aid routes were found by KUOW to contain dozens of seismically vulnerable bridges. The state does not publish the totality of its infrastructure needs, in contrast to its seismic cousin California. Until KUOW published a map showing the locations of the endangered bridges, no such public information was available.
  • The White Helmets

    In most Syrian cities, there is no police, fire department or government emergency service left, but there is the Syrian Civil Defense, known on the ground by the stark white helmets they wear.
  • Dying For Help: Fixing The Nation's Emergency Response System

    Two year investigation fixes stunning weaknesses in the nation’s 911 system, resulting in improvements at the FCC and state governments, an elegant invention to solve the problem, and two US patents that will make us all safer.
  • Chemical Breakdown

    A 2014 toxic gas release at DuPont’s pesticide plant outside Houston killed four workers and endangered the surrounding community. In response to those deaths, the Houston Chronicle delved deep into the chemical industry, and the way government regulates these potentially harmful facilities. The Chronicle partnered with experts at Texas A&M to establish a methodology for analyzing chemical inventories to create a potential harm index for facilities throughout the Houston area. Our investigation showed facilities with a high potential for harm were all over the metro area, the government has failed at every level to protect the public and the EPA's chosen solution - a network of local emergency planning committees is destined to fail.
  • Chemical Breakdown

    A 2014 toxic gas release at DuPont’s pesticide plant outside Houston killed four workers and endangered the surrounding community. In response to those deaths, the Houston Chronicle delved deep into the chemical industry, and the way government regulates these potentially harmful facilities. The Chronicle partnered with experts at Texas A&M to establish a methodology for analyzing chemical inventories to create a potential harm index for facilities throughout the Houston area. Our investigation showed facilities with a high potential for harm were all over the metro area, the government has failed at every level to protect the public and the EPA's chosen solution - a network of local emergency planning committees is destined to fail.
  • The Wet Prince of Bel Air

    During a time of severe drought, Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting wanted to learn more about the users of the most water in California. Reporters found that one homeowner in Los Angeles’ posh Bel Air neighborhood had used 11.8 million gallons of water in a single year during a drought emergency and that 4 of the top 10 known mega water users were also in Bel Air. But city officials wouldn’t reveal who those customers were. So in a follow-up story, Reveal used satellite analysis and public records to identify the seven most likely culprits. https://www.revealnews.org/article/the-wet-prince-of-bel-air-who-is-californias-biggest-water-guzzler/
  • Philly's Invisible Youth

    In a major multimedia investigation for Al Jazeera America, Laura Rena Murray writes about the alarming increase of homeless youth in Philadelphia and the utter failure of the child welfare agency and the emergency shelter system to care for them. By 2011, one in 20 of the city’s public high school students identified as having been homeless. Between 2009 and 2013, that percentage increased by 73 percent. There are many reasons youth end up on the streets. Most are trying to escape violent homes. http://projects.aljazeera.com/2015/12/homeless-youth/resources.html