Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "enterprise" ...

  • WBEZ: A 'Broth of Legionella' And Why It Keeps Killing At An Illinois Veterans' Home

    Illinois law changed and the most expensive governor’s race in American history swung against the incumbent after WBEZ produced more than 40 enterprise stories in 2018 about the mishandling of recurring Legionnaires’ disease outbreaks tied to 14 deaths at the largest state-run veterans’ home.
  • GateHouse Media: Failure to Deliver

    More women are choosing to deliver their babies outside the hospital as a part of a growing national trend, but a nine-month investigation by GateHouse Media and the Sarasota Herald-Tribune found that it’s a deadlier practice than hospital deliveries and leaves families little recourse when something goes wrong.
  • FLIPPED: Secrets Inside a Corrupt Police Department

    This is a year-long investigation of a corrupt police department that was operating as a criminal enterprise. A one-man-band investigative reporter revealed institutional and systemic failures inside a large Metro Atlanta police department. By cultivating internal police sources, he was able to demand specific, hidden public records that uncovered several scandals the Roswell Police Department tried to keep secret from the public. This investigation and public records fight resulted in the resignation of the police chief, the firing of three police officers, and an overhaul of the city's open records system to improve public access.
  • On Your Dime

    WVUE-TV’s “On Your Dime” is a true enterprising investigative series. None of the stories was generated via a tip, but instead by proactive and dogged investigating by the WVUE-TV team. Our investigative team’s extensive research drove “On Your Dime” and uncovered questionable activity and spending by officials. “On Your Dime” launched investigations by several agencies. https://vimeo.com/196277083/2ea38bda5e
  • Cash for Compliance?

    In their ongoing "Cash for Compliance?" series, the reporters revealed how a group called Advocates for Individuals with Disabilities (AID) grossly exploited the Americans with Disabilities Act and leveraged it into a money-making machine cloaked as a non-profit organization. The reporters have produced more than two dozen stories that systematically unraveled AID's multi-layered enterprise and showed its deception, hypocrisy, motives and players. Their major findings include: - AID’s own facilities had the same violations as the 1700 businesses they’ve sued. - No one with disabilities ever visited the businesses AID sued. - The IRS granted AID official non-profit status. However, on its IRS application, the reporters uncovered AID didn’t disclose any information about its lawsuits and its plan to self-fund through litigation. The reporters also revealed that AID set up other business entities that shuffle funds. - AID is secretly funded and backed by a controversial entrepreneur with a history of consumer fraud. - The lead attorney for AID has a history of ethical violations. The reporters also discovered that he made repeated mistakes in AID’s lawsuits. The State Bar of Arizona has interviewed many of the people featured in their reports.
  • Fatal shooting exposes nepotism in the California Senate

    The California Capitol was rocked last year by criminal charges against three state senators accused in unrelated cases of bribery, perjury and conspiracy to traffic weapons. These were high-profile cases that garnered widespread media attention and public hand-wringing by politicians. What wasn't being covered by anyone else was the stories you will read here, about an ethical crisis simmering in the administrative side of the state Senate -- problems that had been largely ignored by the politicians elected to run the house. This entry includes 11 news stories I wrote over six months, a mix of enterprise investigations and breaking news. Rosenhall coverage led to significant changes in the administration of the California Senate.
  • House Stealing Investigation Changes State Law

    Our investigation revealed rampant criminal activity among opportunists trying to capitalize on loopholes in Georgia law and ultimately led to a change in the law, the creation of a fraud registry, and the indictment of eight people. Four years earlier, we had already exposed another group's efforts to steal empty homes by filing false deeds however several members of the racketeering enterprise were acquitted, which exposed legal flaws. Our latest investigation spotlighted how a few members of the group were able to expand their enterprise to target regular homeowners rather than foreclosures, and steal some of the very homes for which they'd previously been arrested. Once we approached legislators about the loopholes, they fast-tracked new legislation to make this activity a felony.
  • Smart ALEC Oregon

    A team of KBOO reporters carried out a six-month investigation researching, cataloging and analyzing Oregon legislation which has been influenced, or created by, the American Legislative Exchange Council, (ALEC). ALEC states that their organization is "the nation’s largest, non-partisan, individual public-private membership association of state legislators...which works to advance the fundamental principles of free-market enterprise, limited government, and federalism at the state level." KBOO volunteer investigative reporters reviewed hundreds of Oregon state legislative activities, and interviewed dozens of state legislators and lobbyists, to uncover ALEC influences.
  • The Rise and Fall of a Patrón

    Our investigation showed how powerful political alliances helped United Neighborhood Organization (UNO) grow from a community group into a multimillion-dollar enterprise operating 16 taxpayer-funded charter schools, a janitorial firm and other businesses. We found a lack of oversight of charter school finances and operations cleared the way for alleged abuse. Specifically: UNO received more than $280 million in public money over the past five years but neither Chicago Public Schools nor the Illinois State Board of Education closely monitored how funds were spent. A large portion of the public money UNO collects goes to management fees, debt service and consultants rather than classrooms.
  • 108 Hours: Inside the Hunt for the Boston Marathon Bombers

    As the one-year anniversary of the bombings approached, Brian Williams and a team of producers, crews and editors set out to produce an in-depth look at the attack, using a unique frame: the 108 hours that elapsed between the start of the race and the capture of the second suspect. Our program aired April 11, 2014 and was the culmination enterprise journalism. The program examined the actual hunt for the suspects through the eyes, and in some cases the gun sights, of those directly involved in the manhunt.