Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "equipment" ...

  • The Dallas Morning News: Pain & Profit

    Healthcare companies made billions of dollars while systematically denying life-sustaining drugs and treatments to thousands of sick kids and elderly and disabled Texans. The companies profited by stalling or denying nursing services, medical equipment and therapy. And for lying about how many doctors they had available to treat patients. State officials knew about horrific failures but covered it all up.
  • Pain & Profit

    Healthcare companies made billions of dollars while systematically denying life-sustaining drugs and treatments to thousands of sick kids and elderly and disabled Texans. The companies profited by stalling or denying nursing services, medical equipment and therapy. And for lying about how many doctors they had available to treat patients. State officials knew about horrific failures but covered it all up.
  • How Urgent Is ‘Urgent’ Healthcare? As walk-in urgent care centers spread, so do questions about their expertise. One thing for sure: They’re not emergency rooms.

    More and more medical practices across the country are rebranding themselves as urgent care centers. Their proliferation is skyrocketing, almost unheard of two decades ago. They sound like places promising the kind of medical attention offered at emergency rooms. But they don’t. They are unregulated in New York and most other states; in New York, they are combating any effort at more oversight. For patients who go expecting emergency room-like care, there are concerns. There can result is delay in needed care, lack of equipment to do vital tests, and even fatal results. There is also a dark economic underbelly harming hospitals that actually do emergency work.
  • The Pentagon Finally Details its Weapons-for-Cops Giveaway

    The Marshall Project, in collaboration with MuckRock, published, for the first time, agency-level data on the Pentagon's 1033 program, a program brought to light during the protests in Ferguson, Mo., in which the Pentagon gives surplus weapons, aircraft and vehicles to law enforcement agencies. We wrote an initial story on the data, created an easy-to-use, embeddable widget, and put together a "Department of Defense gift guide," highlighting some of the more perplexing giveaways. The story led to unprecedented public scrutiny of military equipment going to law enforcement agencies, as over forty local news outlets published articles detailing what their local cops had received.
  • 1033 program

    Over the past year, MuckRock reporter and projects editor Shawn Musgrave investigated the Pentagon’s 1033 program, which distributes excess military equipment to law enforcement agencies nationwide. After the Department of Defense rejected FOIA requests for data indicating which departments had received tactical equipment such as assault rifles, armored vehicles, and grenade launchers, Musgrave — spurred by events in Ferguson — submitted FOI requests to each state’s 1033 program coordinator. This effort not only secured this crucial data for 38 states, but also pressured the Pentagon to reverse its position and release spreadsheets which detailed what tactical equipment had been distributed to every participating agency in the country. MuckRock’s investigation of the 1033 program revealed such questionable transfers as mine-resistant vehicles distributed to school districts and helicopters allocated to small-town police departments.
  • MSNBC - Ronan Farrow Daily / “Inside the VA” Series / “VA Colonoscopy Injury Claims Denied”

    In 2009, the Department of Veterans Affairs contacted more than 10,000 U.S. military veterans who had received medical care at VA facilities in three states, notifying them that there was a possibility that they could have been exposed to infectious viruses during VA colonoscopy and endoscopy procedures -- because of problems with the configuration and cleaning of some of the equipment used. Five years later, after receiving a response from the VA to our Freedom of Information Act request, the NBC News Investigative Unit and MSNBC’s Ronan Farrow Daily show entered into an investigative collaboration to follow-up on this story. We discovered that the majority of those claims were listed as “denied by [VA] regional counsel.”
  • Fatal Leak

    After four DuPont workers were killed in a plant accident in La Porte, the Chronicle put its investigative team in charge of the follow-up. The reporters quickly discovered that the company failed to respond properly to the accident and had put its workers at risk by not providing necessary safety equipment. Further investigation revealed another DuPont worker's brush with death and illustrated how DuPont's safety record had slipped in recent years.
  • Countdown to Zero Day: Stuxnet and the Launch of the First Digital Weapon

    In 2010, computer security researchers discovered a mysterious virus/worm infecting computers in Iran. At first, they believed the malicious code was a simple, routine piece of malware. But as they and other experts around the world dug into the code, they found that it was a virus of unparalleled sophistication and complexity. They had, they soon learned, stumbled upon the world’s first digital weapon. Stuxnet, as it came to be known, was unlike other viruses and worms built before because rather than simply hijacking targeted computers or stealing information from them, it escaped the digital realm to physically destroy equipment the computers controlled. Stuxnet had been designed and launched to destroy centrifuges used in a uranium-enrichment plant in Iran in order to set back the Islamic Republic's nuclear program and prevent it from producing a nuclear weapon.
  • The Chronicle of Higher Ed: On Campus, Grenade Launchers, M-16s, and Armored Vehicles

    The Chronicle’s investigation revealed nearly 120 college police forces acquired military gear from the Department of Defense through the controversial 1033 program. Advocates contended the low-cost equipment is an indispensable resource during crowd-control situations or active-shooter incidents. Detractors argued the procurement of tactical gear fails to aid against the types of crimes that occur more frequently on college campuses, like alcohol-related incidents and sexual assault. Others worried military equipment is an especially poor fit on college campuses, and feared it may have a chilling effect on free expression.
  • Greek Tragedies

    The University of Illinois has the largest number of Greek chapters in the country, with 4,000 students living in Greek houses. City safety inspectors find hundreds of fire hazards and safety violations in fraternities and sororities at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign each year, yet it can take months before some violations are corrected, inspection documents show. Almost all of the 60 fraternities and sororities inspected in 2012 had violations, many of which included disconnected smoke detectors, overloaded extension cords, broken sprinklers and faulty emergency lights, according to 2012 inspection records. Other violations were for unapproved cooking equipment such as hotplates, pizza ovens and self-heating skillets.