Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

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Search results for "ex-felons" ...

  • Ohio Parole System Problems

    Over the course of 18 months, three young women were killed in separate murders by violent ex-felons who were supposed to be closely monitored by Ohio’s Adult Parole Authority. They weren’t. Time and time again, WBNS-TV’s investigative unit, 10 Investigates, found lapses in judgment and failures by the state’s parole system to closely monitor these ex-felons. In one case, a Georgia judge’s order to place a GPS ankle monitor on a twice convicted rapist was ignored. The reason: Ohio’s Adult Parole Authority believed it would be too expensive. Six months later, the man was arrested for the rape and murder of a young woman. We also uncovered data showing part of the problem might be many of these parole officers are overwhelmed. State corrections records show there are 450 parole officers in Ohio tasked with monitoring 37,000 ex-prisoners who are under some type of post-release supervision. Given that workload, it’s hard for anyone to understand why these parole officers would be assigned to watch an empty parking lot. But that’s where we found some of them sitting every day, for nearly a month. Our reporting on this issue has already changed state law and led to the ire of some state lawmakers who are calling for additional changes.
  • The Long Road to Clemency

    Florida bans more ex-felons from recovering their civil rights, including the right to vote, than any other state. Almost half a million people are caught up in the state's error-ridden system to restore civil rights. Since Jeb Bush took office, the system has slowed to a crawl; it could take decades to clear the backlog of cases. In Bush's six years as governor more than 200,000 applicants, many of them non-violent ex-felons, have been blocked from voting again. The issue took on particular significance in the 2000 presidential election when George W. Bush won the state of Florida by only 537 votes. Included are two follow-ups that cover prominent Florida Republicans taking the lead in asking Governor Bush to automatically grant clemency to ex-felons.
  • The other election scandal

    Rolling Stone questions the laws of Florida and eleven other states that have prohibited residents convicted of felony from casting votes until the end of their lives. The author looks at this issue as "the worst violation of the democratic process," since 5 million free U.S. citizens are disenfranchised. The analysis points out that more than half of the legally prevented form casting their votes are black or Latino, and finds that since 1865 forbidding ex-felons to vote has been "one device to limit the political power of African Americans." The story sheds light on a class-action lawsuit in Florida, which can make disenfranchisement an issue in the 2002 gubernatorial election.