Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "excessive" ...

  • NJ Advance Media: The Force Report

    A 16-month investigation by NJ Advance Media that found New Jersey's system for tracking police force is broken, with no statewide collection or analysis of data, little oversight by state officials and no standard practices among local departments. Two decades ago, officials envisioned a centralized database that would flag dangerous cops, preventing unnecessary injuries and costly excessive force lawsuits. But that database was never created. So we built it.
  • Daily Herald: Illinois tollway series

    The Illinois tollway, governed by a nonelected board of political appointees, is the only option to get around the Chicago region for millions of drivers who spend $1.3 billion annually to use the system. While hardworking customers paid tolls, tollway executives and board directors were quietly hiring political insiders for high-paying jobs, handing lucrative contracts to firms where their relatives worked, and weakening bylaws to water down the tollway board’s conflict-of-interest rules. As the Daily Herald exposed nepotism, patronage and excessive spending at the tollway, the agency’s leaders fought back. Tactics included denying FOIAs, concealing information and accusing the newspaper of harassment. The Daily Herald’s investigation caught the attention of other media, two governors and state lawmakers who ultimately fired the tollway board of directors in early 2019. Legislators credited the Herald’s investigative series with alerting the public about what Gov. J.B. Pritzker referred to “unethical behavior.”
  • Forcing the Peace

    WCPO's I-Team investigated police use of force involving officers at 32 local police departments. Our investigation uncovered excessive force, unreported use of force and identified the police officer who punched more people in the face than any other local cop. We also revealed black children were more likely than adults to be tased by police.
  • The Force Report

    A 16-month investigation by NJ Advance Media that found New Jersey's system for tracking police force is broken, with no statewide collection or analysis of data, little oversight by state officials and no standard practices among local departments. Two decades ago, officials envisioned a centralized database that would flag dangerous cops, preventing unnecessary injuries and costly excessive force lawsuits. But that database was never created. So we built it.
  • Disorderly Conduct

    The story explores and exposes misconduct within an undercover unit of the Minneapolis Police Department, behavior that included everything from excessive force to engaging in sexual contact with prostitution suspects — and that regularly compromised prosecutions.
  • Focus on Force

    An Orlando Sentinel investigation found that the Orlando Police Department used force against suspects far more often than other departments of similar size; that a small number of officers accounted for an outsize proportion of the use of force; that the department’s internal-affairs division never investigated officer violence that resulted in the city’s paying more than $1 million to settle excessive-force claims; and that the city’s downtown core accounted for one in every three instances of force used by officers against suspects.
  • The Pentagon Finally Details its Weapons-for-Cops Giveaway

    The Marshall Project, in collaboration with MuckRock, published, for the first time, agency-level data on the Pentagon's 1033 program, a program brought to light during the protests in Ferguson, Mo., in which the Pentagon gives surplus weapons, aircraft and vehicles to law enforcement agencies. We wrote an initial story on the data, created an easy-to-use, embeddable widget, and put together a "Department of Defense gift guide," highlighting some of the more perplexing giveaways. The story led to unprecedented public scrutiny of military equipment going to law enforcement agencies, as over forty local news outlets published articles detailing what their local cops had received.
  • Florida Police Shot 574 People: Were they all justified?

    These series were about police-involved shootings in Florida. The stories raise serious questions about abuse of power, excessive force and whether police are always given the benefit of the doubt even when the evidence points to the contrary. NBC 6 was able to give the public a rare look at actions by Miami-Dade Police Department. The series aired before the Ferguson shooting and began drawing national attention to the issue of police shootings when MSNBC rebroadcast part of it. It has helped change county laws. Miami-Dade Police will no longer investigate their own police-involved shootings.
  • Shock & Awe: Miami Cops Misuse Tasers, With Deadly Results

    This article exposes Taser abuse by police officers in Miami, Florida. On August 6, 2013, Miami Beach Police fatally tasered 18-year-old Israel Hernandez after catching him spray-painting graffiti on an abandoned McDonald's. Miami New Times reporter Michael E. Miller broke the story, and then followed it up with a dozen other articles on Hernandez's case. Miller compiled thousands of pages of records that showed local officers were overusing and misusing these devices, resulting in injuries and – in some cases – even death. His reporting showed cops often ignored their own departments' procedures on Taser use, yet were never held accountable.
  • WBEZ probe leads to indictment of Chicago police commander

    Chicago officials have long treated complaints against police officers as if they were state secrets. Citizens file thousands each year but few lead to administrative discipline and almost none to criminal charges. It’s especially rare for a complaint to get a ranking officer in trouble. Since 2007, the city agency that investigates excessive-force complaints has recommended stripping the police powers of only three officers above the sergeant rank. Only one has involved alleged excessive force while on duty.