Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "explosion" ...

  • The Dallas Morning News: Atmos

    A Dallas Morning News investigation showing how more than two dozen homes across North and Central Texas have blown up since 2006 because of leaking natural gas along lines owned and operated by Atmos Energy Corp. Nine people died in these explosions; at least 22 others were badly injured. The News' investigation also showed how the state agency that is supposed to regulate gas companies in Texas frequently let Atmos Energy off the hook, even in explosions that killed people.
  • Boston Globe: Lawrence Gas Explosions

    After the Merrimack Valley region of Massachusetts was rocked on Sept. 13, 2018, by natural gas explosions that killed one young man, displaced thousands of residents, and cut off heat and power to homes and businesses for three months, the Boston Globe responded with dozens of daily stories as well as a steady stream of investigative pieces, attempting to tell readers exactly what had happened and why -- and whether the officials working to set things right were up to the task. Here are five early examples of investigative work connected to the disaster.
  • Atmos gas explosion

    “Atmos gas explosion” is a WFAA investigation into lax regulatory oversight and shoddy maintenance of Atmos Energy, a natural gas supplier, that puts millions of North Texas residents in continued danger. The series of stories was triggered by a fatal natural gas home explosion that killed a 12-year-old girl.
  • Degree of Debt

    “Degree of Debt” is a multi-state investigation by Raycom Media that exposes one of the most crippling impacts on the U.S. economy, the virtual explosion of student debt. The numbers are staggering. Over 41 million students owe a collective $1.4 trillion; a figure that dwarfs credit card and auto loan debt combined. Of that $41 million in debt, nearly 8.1 million of those people are currently in default. According to the Congressional Budget Office, over the next decade the federal government will make $81 billion in profit from student loans, over $8 billion a year. The Raycom investigative series used several federal databases along with shoe leather reporting to educate our viewers/readers on the biggest offenders and what needs to change. http://www.vimeo.com/leezurik/IREDegreeofDebt https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Y09_yQ9Bwo&feature=youtu.be
  • Growing Oil Train Traffic is Shrouded in Secrecy

    Oil train traffic in the Northwest is on the rise, as more oil from the Bakken fields of North Dakota arrives at Washington refineries. But despite numerous incidents of oil trains catching fire and exploding around North America, the companies transporting that oil aren't sharing enough information with local and state emergency responders. Ashley Ahearn examined the consequences of that data gap and the risk to the public, and profiles citizens who are taking matters into their own hands and tracking the oil trains themselves.
  • Exxon Mobil's Near Miss

    CBS News exposes a near miss at an Exxon Mobil refinery in Southern California that could have put 200,000 people at risk. https://vimeo.com/cbseveningnews/review/149886751/86f4329ecd
  • The Billion Dollar Startup Club

    The Wall Street Journal sought a powerful way to illustrate the tech boom and the explosion of capital flooding startups. The resulting interactive spurred a new investigative series called “Private Risk,” which examines the intersection of Wall Street and Silicon Valley. For the startup companies that populate Silicon Valley, the idea of raising $1 billion has long been hailed as a near-mythical achievement. The 2010 movie about Facebook Inc., “The Social Network,” hammered this notion into the mainstream American lexicon. But it has become clear that a $1 billion valuation for a startup is no longer unusual. In early 2015, our research found that more than 80 startup companies were valued at that amount and the list was growing as never before. Just a few years earlier, only a handful of companies had achieved this milestone. We needed a way to better track this boom and create a trusted resource for readers who may not have heard of these companies. Over time we hope to show the expansion and contraction of capital, perhaps a visual accounting of a boom and a bust. At the top of the interactive, we created a unique radial bar that displays the size of each company's valuation over time. Readers can move a slider underneath the chart between months, enabling the radial bar to contract or expand along with a sortable table below that includes written profiles of all the companies. These profiles are created by dozens of Journal reporters around the world, based on interviews with each company. The Billion Dollar Startup Club has become a dependable resource for readers and is often cited online and in internal reports by big firms such as Goldman Sachs. The interactive allows us to enhance our articles dealing with startups; related coverage is linked along the right rail of the interactive. The list now includes more than 125 companies, double the number we started with.
  • Blood Lessons

    The Texas Tribune and the Houston Chronicle spent months examining whether the nation’s oil refineries had learned the lessons of the deadly explosion at BP’s Texas City refinery in 2005, one of the most horrific and studied industrial accidents in U.S. history. What our reporters found was astonishing: that preventable deaths in the industry have barely slowed in the decade since the blast in which 15 workers lost their lives.
  • Danger Zone: Examining safety in the oil and gas boom

    In its "Danger Zone" investigation, EnergyWire found that lax safety procedures in the booming oil and gas drilling industry are killing workers. The series showed that many of the threats to workers, such as explosions and toxic gases, also threaten the general public.
  • Pimp City: A Journey to the Center of the Sex Slave Trade

    As authorities in the US struggle to keep up with the explosion in sex trafficking, Fusion’s investigative documentary, "Pimp City: A Journey to the Center of the Sex Slave Trade", uncovers a subversive network linking America’s secret neighborhood brothels to a remote Mexican town that traffics more sex slaves to the US, than anywhere else.