Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "factory" ...

  • Toxic Legacy Sites in New York State

    Three stories focused on the toxic pollution that still lies underneath the surface -- long forgotten but still potentially harmful.
  • Insult to Injury

    As Tesla races to revolutionize the automobile industry and build a more sustainable future, it has left its factory workers in the past, still painfully vulnerable to the dangers of manufacturing. Our reporting shows that Tesla prioritized speed over safety, ignored its own safety experts and denied proper medical care to injured workers. And in order to make its safety record look better than it really is, Tesla has kept injuries off the books. Our radio segments take listeners into the factory and behind the scenes, as whistleblowers tell their secrets and workers show the toll on their lives.
  • Buffalo Billion

    Investigative Post has been covering the Buffalo Billion since its inception, including a 2014 story on a curiously worded Request for Proposals that appeared to limit the field to one local developer – a major donor to the governor. In late 2015, news broke that U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara was investigating the awarding of contracts on the biggest Buffalo Billion project – the state’s commitment to spend $750 million to build and equip a factory for SolarCity, a solar panel manufacturer. Investigative Post continued to cover the Buffalo Billion, and similar initiatives in other Upstate cities, throughout 2016.
  • The University of Louisville Foundation Bought An Empty Factory In Oklahoma—Because A Donor Asked

    Reporter Kate Howard revealed how the University of Louisville’s nonprofit fundraising arm bought an abandoned factory in Oklahoma at the behest of a major donor. The multi-layered $3.47 million-dollar transaction had no academic purpose, did not result in any revenue for the organization and appeared to be an ethical breach and tax code violation.
  • Dangerous Jobs, Cheap Meat

    Americans love meat – we have one of the highest rates of consumption in the world. While U.S. shoppers enjoy relatively low prices and an array of choices, there is a high human price tag. The more than 500,000 men and women who work in slaughterhouses and meat processing plants have some of the most dangerous factory jobs in America. The meatpacking industry has made a lot of progress on worker safety since publication of Upton Sinclair’s “The Jungle” in 1906, but some things remain the same: the work is mostly done by immigrants and refugees; they suffer high rates of injuries and even, sometimes death; and the government lags in oversight. http://harvestpublicmedia.org/content/dangerous-jobs-cheap-meat
  • Blue Bell Listeria Outbreak

    CBS News exposes the unsanitary conditions at a Blue Bell Ice Cream factory in Texas that was linked to an outbreak of listeria that killed three people and sickened 10 others. In this three part series, former workers detail the complaints they shared with management which went largely ignored and we look at how random testing led to the discovery of the deadly bacteria. https://vimeo.com/cbseveningnews/review/149809921/28ecbaac49
  • Sell Block: The empty promises of prison labor

    Our state’s glossy marketing brochures and polished YouTube videos told a story that everyone wanted to believe: Washington Correctional Industries, a for-profit arm of the state prison system, would employ inmates in its factories to make goods for government agencies while paying for itself. The program would teach prisoners new skills so that after release they’d more easily find jobs, thereby lowering crime. It was a wonderful success story, but, unfortunately, it was mostly untrue. Behind the nation’s fourth-largest inmate labor program, our reporters found a broken system that has cost taxpayers tens of millions of dollars, charged exorbitant markups on goods that state agencies are required to buy, and taken jobs from private businesses that can’t compete with cheap prison labor. “Sell Block: The Empty Promises of Prison Labor” is the first investigative project about this growing industry
  • Made in Bangladesh

    Following two deadly factory disasters, Fault Lines traces Bangladesh’s garment supply chain to investigate whether U.S. retailers like Walmart and Gap know where their clothes are being made. In November 2012, a fire at the Tazreen Fashions factory in Bangladesh killed at least 112 people. Walmart’s Faded Glory brand shorts were among the clothing found in the charred remains. Walmart blamed its supplier, saying the order had been subcontracted to Tazreen without its authorization. But as Fault Lines follows the paper trail of the Faded Glory order, what some call an “open secret” is revealed: that corporations deliberately turn a blind eye to the practice of subcontracting. The owner of the factory at the center of the Faded Glory order describes how it ended up in Tazreen, and an insider explains how retailers cut corners to keeps prices low. To confirm the allegations, Fault Lines visits an unauthorized finishing house, where children as young as 12 are unexpectedly found working on Old Navy products.
  • As OSHA Emphasizes Safety, Long-Term Health Risks Fester

    For years, Sheri Farley worked in a cushion-making factory. Spray-gun in hand, she stood enveloped in a yellowish fog, breathing glue fumes that ate away at her nerve endings. “Dead foot” set in. She walked with a limp, then a cane, then she didn't walk much at all. “Part of the job,” was the shrugging response from her managers. This article was the first to reveal how the furniture industry used a dangerous chemical called nPB despite urgent warnings from the companies that manufactured it. The story also described egregious behavior by a small cushion-making company in North Carolina called Royale Comfort Seating, where Ms. Farley worked. The piece spotlighted the consequences of OSHA's failure to police long-term health risks and how efforts to control one chemical left workers exposed to something worse. Workplace illnesses like Ms. Farley's affect more than 200,000 Americans per year and cost our economy more than $250 billion annually. The agency responsible for ensuring that Americans can breathe clean air on the job focuses primarily on deadly accidents. But ten times as many people die from inhaling toxic substances at work.
  • Tragedy in Bangladesh

    A dramatic ABC News Nightline investigation exposed the horrific fire-trap conditions in Bangladesh garment factories, prized by top US clothing brands for having the cheapest labor in the world, where workers are paid less than 25 cents an hour. The story revealed the epidemic confronting those who sew clothes for American brands -- more than 500 garment workers have died in fires there in the past five years. The reports by Investigative Producer Matt Mosk and Chief Investigative Correspondent Brian Ross unraveled the intricacies of the problem, showing how American brands pressure factory owners to lower costs at the expense of safety. And it examined the graphic evidence behind one of the country’s deadliest fires – when 29 workers were locked in and others forced to leap to their deaths because the factory making Tommy Hilfiger sweaters had no fire escape.