Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "fatality" ...

  • Sea Dragon Down

    The NBC News Investigative Unit, the Virginian-Pilot newspaper, tand the UC Berkeley Investigative Reporting Program revealed that the U.S. Navy’s Sea Dragon helicopters had killed more than 30 service members since they were launched in the 1980s, with the fatality rate rising in recent years – and that the Navy was trying to cover up the danger. The exclusive reporting of all three news organizations of the Navy’s cover-up helped spur the grounding of the entire fleet of more than 150 helicopters for most of 2015.
  • 911 Dispatch Delay

    In November of 2012, a man dialed 911 for help from his apartment which had caught fire. The fire spread quickly while he was on the phone with 911. The fire took his life. An internal investigation that began the next morning and continued for the next year determined a failure to properly dispatch the fire department led to a nearly five minute delay in response. It was only the second time in the history of the Onondaga County 911 center a dispatch delay had led, in part, to a fatality. The delay was never revealed. Not to the man's family, the fire department or the public. Three years after the fire our investigation of more than eight months led to all of those parties learning of the deadly delay. We also discovered the dispatcher who was determined to be at fault served no punishment and was not retrained. http://cnycentral.com/news/local/911-commissioner-5-minute-dispatch-delay-blamed-partly-for-fiery-death http://cnycentral.com/news/local/fire-victim-tells-911-call-taker-i-dont-want-to-die-during-dispatch-delay https://youtu.be/WqkQpYKN65E https://youtu.be/TAsu2G4oWpo https://youtu.be/vLbMZltc-sE https://youtu.be/IGy14aM64GI
  • Missed signs. Fatal consequences.

    A series of stories about how Texas state law required the filing of a child fatality report when a child dies of abuse or neglect, but no one looked at them afterward to look for patterns, trends or red flags to help prevent such deaths in the future. So we analyzed them and reported on what we found. http://projects.statesman.com/news/cps-missed-signs/ https://github.com/statesman/cps/
  • Dark Side of the Boom: How Dangerous Is Too Dangerous?

    In a multi-part radio and web series, Rocky Mountain PBS explored the oil and gas industry’s culture of risk-taking, asked why action has not been taken in North Dakota to lower the high fatality rate, and looked to other dangerous industries and states, past and present, for potential solutions.
  • Dying at Opp

    "Dying at OPP" examined how the troubled Orleans Parish Prison, Louisiana’s largest lockup for pre-trial suspects, handled inmate deaths. The series exposed institutional failings and indifference that persist despite the jail being under a court order mandating widespread reforms. After the series, the Orleans Parish Sheriff’s Office, which operates the jail, called in outside law enforcement agencies to investigate the latest inmate fatality -- only the second time in at least a decade that an outside law enforcement was called in to review a jail death. The series also led to major policy changes at the Orleans Parish Coroner’s Office. Our series exposed a lack of autopsies when inmates died at a hospital after becoming ill or injured in jail. The coroner now requires his pathologists conduct autopsies in those cases.
  • Fatal Care

    After a four-year battle with government, the Edmonton Journal won unprecedented access to death records for all of the children who died in provincial care between 1999 and 2013. Reporter Karen Kleiss cross-referenced nearly 2,000 pages of death records with court documents and fatality inquiry reports to build a database that revealed 145 children had died in care, more than triple the number reported by government. Kleiss analyzed the database for trends and, with Calgary Herald reporter Darcy Henton, searched the province for grieving families who had never before told their stories. In the wake of the series, the government pledged to create unprecedented transparency around child welfare deaths, overhaul the child death review system and reconsider a publication ban that prohibits families and media from sharing the names and images of these children with the public.
  • Asiana Flight 214 Crash

    NBC Bay Area’s news team set the bar for coverage of the crash of Asiana flight 214. We provided on the scene live reports, graphics, unique details and facts along with unmatched analysis and aviation expertise. Combined, this coverage gave our audience the news in real time, with unique details learned only through us, told within context, all non-stop and commercial-free for the next seven and a half hours plus new details uncovered by our investigative team in the days immediately following the crash. In the minutes and hours following the crash, NBC Bay Area’s team broke every major detail of the crash, including: • First detailed mapping of the airport and accident scene • First details that the airport’s electronic glide slope was out of service • First survivor interview with first person account of crash • First audio from tower • First detailed coordinates of the plane’s position during landing, including its unstabilized approach • First to report the plane had been coming in too low and too slow to land safely • First details of how one passenger fatality was caused by a fire truck running over her
  • Waiting to React: Tennessee's child protection failures

    A lawmaker's concern about child deaths triggered a probing and ongoing Tennessean investigation into the failings and illegal practices of the Tennessee Department of Children’s Services. The newspaper detailed how the department broke the law by not reporting deaths to lawmakers; failed to keep accurate fatality statistics; allowed thousands of child abuse hotline calls to go unanswered; struggled to handle a spike in violence at youth detention centers; and adopted adversarial positions against child advocates, lawmakers, police and the agencies that oversee the department. Led by two reporters, the newspaper has exposed the department's $37 million computer installation debacle, shortcomings in how officials contract with private companies, and how a wave of abrupt senior-level firings made DCS one of the most volatile departments in Tennessee government. Through records requests, data analyses, close readings of reports and audits, and persistent questioning, The Tennessean penetrated the secretive $650 million department and provided a level of accountability just as the department has moved to dismantle other forms of oversight. The reporting prompted Gov. Bill Haslam to personally review DCS case files and forced the department to comply with fatality notification laws. An ongoing open records lawsuit led by The Tennessean and backed by the state's largest ever media coalition now seeks to force DCS to make child fatality records available to the media and the public for the first time.
  • Cell Tower Deaths

    A ProPublica/Frontline analysis of every cell tower-related fatality since 2003 found that tower climbing has a death rate roughly 10 times that of construction, making it one of the most dangerous jobs in America. AT&T, in particular, had the worst track record with more fatalities on its subcontracted jobs than its three closest competitors combined. Yet cell-phone carriers’ connection to tower-climbing deaths has remained largely invisible, because climbers do not work directly for the communications giants whose wireless networks they enable. They are subcontractors – and a microcosm of a larger trend in American labor, in which companies increasingly outsource their riskiest jobs, avoiding scrutiny and accountability when workers die. Our reporting team penetrated deeply into the world of climbing, examining each of the 50 cell-tower deaths since 2003. Our reporters found climbers were often shoddily equipped, poorly trained and compelled to meet tight deadlines, sometimes by working through perilous conditions. And our investigation also revealed OSHA’s struggles to improve safety in tower climbing and fields like it. Labor experts and even former OSHA chiefs described the agency as woefully ill-equipped to handle enforcement issues that have come with the growth of subcontracting.
  • Fleet But Fatally Fragile

    After witnessing a horse pull up lame while at the racetrack, reporter John Tedesco overheard a security guard noting that the horse would likely be "put down." Spurred by this, Tedesco researched how often racehorses suffer this tragic fate, and discovered more than just statistics. The story details how "performance-enhancing medications, both legal and illegal, are routinely administered to the majestic animals."