Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "faulty" ...

  • In the Dark

    “In the Dark” was a narrative investigative series, providing the anatomy of the faulty police investigation into the 1994 slayings of a young mother and her toddler son, Stacy Falcon Dewey and Jacob Dewey. The investigation allowed the truth to slip through the cracks despite DNA evidence that had linked a convicted murderer to the crime scene. The story uncovered emails and other records that showed how neglect and indifference by forensics examiners and prosecutors delayed the case, leaving the victims’ unwitting family to suffer for years without answers.
  • Dangerous Air Bags

    The Department of Transportation is investigating Knoxville, Tenn. based ARC Automotive for potentially manufacturing faulty air bag inflators. The inflators can become clogged over time, investigators believe, causing the driver to be hit with shrapnel in a low-speed crash. WBIR 10News tracked down and interviewed a victim who was nearly killed in such a crash. Her complaint sparked the nationwide recall investigation.
  • A Perfect Storm

    Findings from a Channel 4 I-Team investigation that stretched over a two-year period into Tennessee prisons and the department of correction resulted in 2015 in four legislative hearings, an independent audit, proof that lawmakers received faulty information in testimony, calls for the resignation of the commissioner and forced the department to re-define how it classified assaults.
  • Borrowing Trouble

    For years, Chicago taxpayers have been paying an exorbitant price for the faulty financial decisions of school officials – only they didn’t know it. Not surprisingly, leaders of the city’s public schools weren’t advertising the high costs of the losing bets they had placed in a risky debt market. Over the life of the deals, Chicago Public Schools will likely end up paying $100 million more than it would have if officials had stuck with traditional fixed-rate bonds. The story implicated state lawmakers, the school district's financial advisors, and the current school board president in the disastrous deals.
  • Collision Course

    According to the Federal Motor Carrier Administration (FMCSA), nearly 4,000 people died in trucking accidents in 2012 – up 18% from 2009. But what is being done to ensure better safety on U.S. roads? "Collision Course," a four-part investigative series reported by Eamon Javers, shines a light on the dangers of crashes that involve long-haul trucks. CNBC breaks down the numbers highlighting that 20% of trucks (over 2 million) inspected in 2012 had out of service violations – faulty brakes, bad tires and shouldn't have been on the road. And, nearly 5% of truck drivers (171,000) had enough violations to be pulled from behind the wheel.
  • Failure to Recall: Investigating GM

    In this hour-long documentary CNBC investigated a deepening crisis at one of America's most iconic companies. Following the dark days of bankruptcy, General Motors fought its way back to health only to confront evidence of a deadly manufacturing defect and accusations of a corporate cover-up. After linking thirteen deaths and 31 accidents to a faulty ignition switch, the company recalled some 2.6 million cars. But as GM undertook the massive recall, questions mounted over why it hadn't acted sooner to inform the public about the flawed part.
  • Greek Tragedies

    The University of Illinois has the largest number of Greek chapters in the country, with 4,000 students living in Greek houses. City safety inspectors find hundreds of fire hazards and safety violations in fraternities and sororities at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign each year, yet it can take months before some violations are corrected, inspection documents show. Almost all of the 60 fraternities and sororities inspected in 2012 had violations, many of which included disconnected smoke detectors, overloaded extension cords, broken sprinklers and faulty emergency lights, according to 2012 inspection records. Other violations were for unapproved cooking equipment such as hotplates, pizza ovens and self-heating skillets.
  • Civilian Casualties in Afghanistan

    This multi-part print and online investigation, including an extensive, interactive database of incidents involving the deaths of Afghan civilians at the hands of U.S and allied forces, provides the first comprehensive look into collateral damage in the war in Afghanistan over the years 2001 through 2013.* Approximately 30,000 words in all, the package of articles uncovers faulty and profoundly inadequate efforts to count the dead and to keep track of civilian casualties, the gaps and missteps involved in efforts by the United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA) and its office for protection of civilians to account for civilian casualties, serious flaws in the U.S. military’s (classified) database called the Civilian Casualty Tracking Cell (and parallel units), and the lack of any serious effort by the Pentagon to create an Office of Civilian Protection for “lessons learned.” The package examines the practice of lethal profiling of so-called “military age males” throughout the U.S. chain of command and exposes its pernicious effect on American rules of engagement in Afghanistan. It also reports on studies, including those performed by the U.S. military itself, on the measurable and quantifiable effect of civilian casualties in “creating insurgents.” In additional features published online, we report on the haphazard record-keeping and lack of a coherent policy when it comes to payment of reparations for civilians killed in Afghanistan. And we closely examine three mass-casualty incidents involving Afghan civilians, tracing how they resulted from changes in the Pentagon’s own commander directives and guidelines to the troops in the field. *The interactive database concludes at the end of 2012, the last year for which a full data set was available at the time of publication.
  • Exploding Gas Cans

    Our report alerted consumers to a danger that sits in almost every garage and sparked action at the Consumer Product Safety Commission. Red plastic gas cans, the kind used to do things like fill up lawn equipment, are exploding while people use them and some experts say the explosions could be prevented if manufacturers would include a device called a flame arrestor in their product design. Our series warned viewers about what could happen, exposed lawsuits where companies were sued for making faulty products, and asked manufacturers why they haven’t included this life saving product modification.
  • Locked up

    A USA TODAY investigation found that the U.S. Justice Department was using its legal authority to decide who gets locked up for how long in ways that reward the guilty and punish the innocent. Our examination found that government lawyers were trying to keep dozens of men who they conceded were “legally innocent” imprisoned anyway. We found that the Justice Department had kept accused sexual predators locked up for years past the end of their prison sentences on the basis of faulty psychological assessments. And exposed a brazen pay-to-snitch enterprise that illustrated how the government rewards its informants — often hardened criminals — with shorter prison sentences.