Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

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Search results for "felons" ...

  • Silenced: 1.5 Million Florida Felons Without a Vote

    “Silenced: 1.5 Million Florida Felons Without a Vote” is a television news special that raised awareness about the large amount of the state’s population that is ineligible to vote due to a prior felony conviction. The news special outlined the subjectivity in current way in which Florida restores felon’s voting rights, highlighted a proposed state amendment that would automatically restore voting rights to most Florida felons, and featured prospective voters discussing the issue after watching the special as a group.
  • Palm Beach Post: Locked Out

    After seven years in office, Florida Gov. Rick Scott's steps to control the number of felons given the right to vote bore startling results. Not only did he reduce grants of clemency from a flood initiated by his predecessor to a trickle, he granted far fewer to black men and Democrats, a one-of-a-kind Palm Beach Post analysis of clemency records revealed.
  • Ohio Parole System Problems

    Over the course of 18 months, three young women were killed in separate murders by violent ex-felons who were supposed to be closely monitored by Ohio’s Adult Parole Authority. They weren’t. Time and time again, WBNS-TV’s investigative unit, 10 Investigates, found lapses in judgment and failures by the state’s parole system to closely monitor these ex-felons. In one case, a Georgia judge’s order to place a GPS ankle monitor on a twice convicted rapist was ignored. The reason: Ohio’s Adult Parole Authority believed it would be too expensive. Six months later, the man was arrested for the rape and murder of a young woman. We also uncovered data showing part of the problem might be many of these parole officers are overwhelmed. State corrections records show there are 450 parole officers in Ohio tasked with monitoring 37,000 ex-prisoners who are under some type of post-release supervision. Given that workload, it’s hard for anyone to understand why these parole officers would be assigned to watch an empty parking lot. But that’s where we found some of them sitting every day, for nearly a month. Our reporting on this issue has already changed state law and led to the ire of some state lawmakers who are calling for additional changes.
  • Locked Out: Florida sentences are for life

    A group of University of Florida journalists investigated barriers felons face when released from prison in the Sunshine State. For four months, they followed the lives of seven felons, some just minutes after they were released. In a digital-first, Netflix-style episodic investigation, these student journalists explored how the label “felon” follows 1.6 million Floridians long after their sentences end. The student journalists looked into the three major issues Florida felons face: finding a place to live, securing a stable job and earning back their right to vote.
  • AP: Cops Sell Guns

    After a year’s worth of work, the AP found that law enforcement agencies in Washington state sold about 6,000 guns that had been confiscated during criminal investigations, and more than a dozen of those firearms later became evidence in new investigations. The weapons were used to threaten people, seized at gang hangouts, discovered in drug houses, possessed illegally by convicted felons, found hidden in a stolen car, taken from a man who was suffering a mental health crisis and used by an Army veteran to commit suicide.
  • ADG: Violent Reality

    Since 1999, more than 8,000 Arkansans have died by gunfire — about half of them suicides. Although many law enforcement officials and legislators say that gun-control laws might work, they are unwilling to act. The stories explore the effect of specific laws on gun violence in other states, suicide-prevention advocates' work with gun sellers to keep weapons out of suicidal individuals' possession, and federal law enforcement's efforts to keep guns out of the hands of felons.
  • Locked Out: Florida sentences are for life

    A group of University of Florida journalists investigated barriers felons face when released from prison in the Sunshine State. For four months, they followed the lives of seven felons, some just minutes after they were released. In a digital-first, Netflix-style episodic investigation, these student journalists explored how the label “felon” follows 1.6 million Floridians long after their sentences end. The student journalists looked into the three major issues Florida felons face: finding a place to live, securing a stable job and earning back their right to vote.
  • Fugitives Next Door

    Police and prosecutors have secretly decided to allow more than 186,000 accused felons to escape justice simply by crossing state lines. With no one chasing them, those unwanted fugitives have gone on to rape, kidnap, rob banks and kill, often as close as in the state next door. Those decisions, almost always made in secret, allow fugitives to go free across the United States, leaving their crimes unpunished, their victims outraged, and the public at risk.
  • Death by Deadline

    In Death by Deadline, The Marshall Project’s Ken Armstrong reveals how a provision of a 1996 law intended to produce speedier executions has resulted in scores of condemned felons losing their chance for a federal appeal. Armstrong uncovered 80 cases where defense lawyers blew a filing deadline -- in most cases, costing their clients a chance to challenge the verdict or the sentence. The series brought a little-known issue to public attention and may lead to policy recommendations from the American Bar Association and outgoing U.S. attorney general, Eric Holder Jr.
  • Fugitives Next Door

    Police and prosecutors across the United States have secretly decided to allow more than 186,000 accused felons to escape justice simply by crossing state lines. With no one chasing them, those unwanted fugitives have gone on to rape, kidnap, rob banks and kill, often as close as in the state next door. Those decisions, almost always made in secret, allow fugitives to go free across the United States, leaving their crimes unpunished, their victims outraged, and the public at risk.