Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "felony" ...

  • Silenced: 1.5 Million Florida Felons Without a Vote

    “Silenced: 1.5 Million Florida Felons Without a Vote” is a television news special that raised awareness about the large amount of the state’s population that is ineligible to vote due to a prior felony conviction. The news special outlined the subjectivity in current way in which Florida restores felon’s voting rights, highlighted a proposed state amendment that would automatically restore voting rights to most Florida felons, and featured prospective voters discussing the issue after watching the special as a group.
  • ProJo: Suffering in the Shadows: Elder abuse in Rhode Island

    Rhode Island has one of the nation’s highest elderly populations, and a special unit in the state Attorney General’s office dedicated to prosecuting elder abuse. But over 17 years, fewer than half of those charged were convicted of this felony, and only 13 percent served any prison time. The reasons are many, the solutions a challenge -- but there are jurisdictions that do this better.
  • Boston Globe: Secret Courts

    "Secret Courts" exposed the darkest corner of the Massachusetts criminal justice system. Criminal cases, including felony charges of vehicle homicide and rape, are held in closed-door hearings -- often in private offices without public notice -- and the outcome is up to the discretion of a single court official who may not have a law degree. No other state has anything like it.
  • Inside the Secret Courts

    "Secret Courts" exposed the darkest corner of the Massachusetts criminal justice system. Criminal cases, including felony charges of vehicle homicide and rape, are held in closed-door hearings -- often in private offices without public notice -- and the outcome is up to the discretion of a single court official who may not have a law degree. No other state has anything like it.
  • Shielded

    Most states have sovereign immunity laws that protect public entities from being held liable for the illegal actions of their employees, but there’s a weird quirk in Arizona’s law that prevents people from being able to sue a public entity in civil court if the employee committed a felony. The only exception is if the entity had absolute knowledge of the act ahead of time. It’s a situation of unintended consequences that doesn’t come up very often, but that some in the legal world feel needs to be change — Prominent Phoenix lawyer Mike Manning calls this law “an egregious violation of a citizen’s civil rights.” In my story, a young woman was sexually assaulted by a Phoenix Police Officer, and because he will almost certainly be convicted of a felony, the statute prevents her from being able to sue the Phoenix Police Department.
  • Lack of Prosecution in Animal Abuse Cases

    We investigated why Kansas City and Jackson County rarely prosecuted cases of animal abuse. We learned animal control officers in Kanas City have no training or background in investigating these type of cases. Our investigation revealed only three cases of animal abuse were sumbitted for felony prosecution in the past two years. http://fox4kc.com/2015/03/31/woman-says-shes-lost-trust-in-kc-heartbroken-by-the-way-her-dead-dog-was-dumped/ http://fox4kc.com/2015/01/30/resident-demands-change-following-fox-4-investigation-into-kcmo-animal-abuse/ http://fox4kc.com/2015/01/29/fox-4-investigation-are-kc-animal-abusers-being-held-accountable-for-cruelty/
  • Violation of Trust

    A Belleville News-Democrat investigation found that out of 6,744 felony sex crimes reported by victims to police from 2005-2013 in 32 Southern Illinois counties, 70 percent were not prosecuted. And when they were, fewer than one in 10 suspects ever went to prison. Prosecutors blamed police, saying most of the cases they received did not have enough evidence to secure a conviction. http://media.bnd.com/static/media/VOT/index.html http://media.bnd.com/static/media/VOT/index2.html http://media.bnd.com/static/media/VOT/index3.html http://media.bnd.com/static/media/VOT/index4.html
  • Investigation of charter school operator

    For years, Dr. Michael Sharpe was among the most prominent charter school leaders in Connecticut, collecting millions of dollars from lawmakers eager to embrace school reform, and harboring big plans to expand his already growing empire beyond the state’s borders. Today, that empire has collapsed, following deep and aggressive reporting by a team of Hartford Courant reporters who revealed that Sharpe had a felony conviction for financial fraud, had no doctoral degree despite calling himself “Dr.,” had misused state grant money and had turned his Jumoke Academy charter school into a den of nepotism and financial conflicts of interest. As the stories unfolded, Sharpe and his entire leadership team were forced out, and investigations were launched by the state Department of Education and the FBI, which is currently presenting evidence to a federal grand jury.
  • House Stealing Investigation Changes State Law

    Our investigation revealed rampant criminal activity among opportunists trying to capitalize on loopholes in Georgia law and ultimately led to a change in the law, the creation of a fraud registry, and the indictment of eight people. Four years earlier, we had already exposed another group's efforts to steal empty homes by filing false deeds however several members of the racketeering enterprise were acquitted, which exposed legal flaws. Our latest investigation spotlighted how a few members of the group were able to expand their enterprise to target regular homeowners rather than foreclosures, and steal some of the very homes for which they'd previously been arrested. Once we approached legislators about the loopholes, they fast-tracked new legislation to make this activity a felony.
  • Broken Windows

    “Beyond Broken”: The number of summonses issued each year has soared since broken windows was implemented in the early 1990s — from 160,000 in 1993 to a peak of 648,638 in 2005 — making ticket writing for low-level offenses the single most frequent activity of NYPD officers, far surpassing felony and misdemeanor arrests combined. Roughly 81% of the 7.3 million people hit with summonses between 2001 and 2013 were black and Hispanic. And the top 15 precincts with the highest rate of summonses have a population that is 75% or more black and Hispanic. They spoke to nearly 170 people waiting in line at the city’s three summons courts. Although some admitted guilt, many said they felt targeted by officers looking to write tickets, as if their neighborhood were under “martial law.”