Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "finance" ...

  • BuzzFeed News: Trump’s Money Trail

    An investigation, anchored by exclusive documents, into the business holdings and secret financial dealings of President Donald Trump and his associates.
  • Why is it ‘easy’ to steal from youth sports?

    Our investigation exposed how a prominent youth sports league that went to the Little League World Series was being ripped off by adult leaders. When we looked statewide, we found gaping loopholes in youth sport finances.
  • US Tax Havens: The new Switzerland

    Financial Times' Investigations Correspondent Kara Scannell was the first to uncover first hand accounts of how businesses exploit complex trust laws in South Dakota. Her findings, published as "US Tax Havens: The new Switzerland" uncovered a thriving onshore tax haven business. Scannell's shoe-leather reporting gave her unprecedented access to first person sources, including exclusive access to elusive business figures within the shadowy practice. Together with Vanessa Houlder, Scannell's trust law research emboldened a lively, revelatory report that contributed to the ongoing and serious debate over the use and abuse of domestic tax havens.
  • Dark Money: London's dirty secret

    ''Dark Money: London's Dirty Secret'' pierced a world that is normally hidden from all but those who enjoy great wealth or great power: the world of financial secrecy. At a moment when public debate is dominated by inequality and tax evasion, the Financial Times turned a glaring spotlight on the City of London and explained its role in a global system of illicit finance that serves the kleptocrats, criminals and the super-rich. One of the most-read stories of the year on FT.com, Dark Money was a riveting narrative that exposed a system designed to look impenetrable to outsiders. The City’s secrecy specialists spin webs of front companies, offshore accounts and dummy directors that allow tainted wealth to flow around the globe incognito. This system takes dirty money and makes it look clean. It creates a secret world whose existence is corrosive to the rest of society – a piggy bank for untouchable power.
  • NYPD Inc.

    In the wake of a massive corruption scandal in the New York City Police Department, WNYC investigated the outside finances of top NYPD officials. The reporting found numerous top cops earn money on the side with little oversight. Some of these side jobs and investments appear to be conflicts of interest, setting a bad example for the rank and file, and helping create a culture where corruption can breed.
  • Blazer football, death and resurrection

    In late 2014 broke the story that UAB was going to become the first school in 20 years to end a Division 1 football program. Immediately our investigative reporting began, the first revelations coming just after the new 2015 year began. We dug into the financial ramifications, the decision makers behind it and the powerful movement to bring the team back. We discovered a powerful group of people did not want UAB football to exist, but our watchdog reporting fed the public the information they needed to keep fighting -- fans who wouldn't be stopped in its pursuit to return football to Birmingham, and claim black public accountability to their university.
  • Off Track

    An investigation into the finances of the $6.6 billion Honolulu rail project, the largest public construction project in the history of Hawaii. This ongoing series examines where the money is going, whether local companies and workers are getting the jobs and whether it is bolstering the state's economy.
  • Home Sweet Hustle

    For 15 years, the Portland nonprofit Give Us This Day occupied a unique place among foster-care agencies in the state of Oregon. Its four group homes served the most troubled, challenging kids in the state—children who had been sexually abused, starved, beaten and abandoned. It was the state’s only African-American-run foster care agency, a distinction that made it especially valuable to the state agency that manages housing for foster children, the Oregon Department of Human Services. The executive director of Give Us This Day, Mary Holden, was lauded as a human-rights champion. Give Us This Day was also unique in how leniently it was regulated by state officials. The state turned a blind eye to more than 1,000 police reports at foster homes run by Give Us This Day. It regularly paid large cash advances to the provider—something no other foster-care agency requested so regularly. And the Department of Human Services ignored years of allegations that Give Us This Day neglected children.
  • Isis Inc

    The FT’s 'Isis Inc' series is the most difficult, important and revelatory investigation the Financial Times has done in years. It exposed for the first time how the jihadis raise - and spend - their money and run their affairs. It also underlined the failure of the western air campaign to dent its organization and revenues. The power of the reporting was reinforced by a host of telling graphics and interactives. “How oil fuels terrorists” was our most read story of the year.
  • Campaign Finance Questions

    To date, our investigation has uncovered irregularities and possible violations of state campaign law in the campaign finance reports of XXX members of the North Carolina General Assembly. Our investigation continues. Recently, we reported that our questions have prompted an inquiry by the FBI. https://youtu.be/HJ9ZS2TZZQk