Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "finance" ...

  • LinkedIn: Closing The Gap In Finance & Entertainment

    In the era of #MeToo and Times’ Up, LinkedIn partnered with CNBC to get a sense of the state of gender across the American workplace. We received more than 2,000 responses from LinkedIn members working in finance, entertainment and the motion picture/film industry in the U.S. Our questions tried to cover both the alleged problems as well as potential solutions, asking respondents to weigh in on if their careers have been impacted by the issues surfaced by the #MeToo and Time's Up movements and their ideas for how to make the industry more inclusive. We then interviewed more than 100 members across the industry to get their analysis through reported featured on the issues. To date, thousands of additional professionals both on and off LinkedIn have joined the larger conversation about the results and their implications for the American workplace.
  • Zombie Campaigns

    Zombie Campaigns is an in-depth look at the spending habits of 102 former congresspeople who kept spending campaign donations as if they were still campaigning well after they left office. The reporting uncovered a wealth of personal spending and shone a light on loopholes that allowed some politicians to continue spending for decades after they retired, and in some cases even after they died. Along with the story, we published a searchable database of spending by those candidates we identified as running a zombie campaign.
  • LinkedIn: Closing The Gap In Finance & Entertainment

    In the era of #MeToo and Times’ Up, LinkedIn partnered with CNBC to get a sense of the state of gender across the American workplace. We received more than 2,000 responses from LinkedIn members working in finance, entertainment and the motion picture/film industry in the U.S. Our questions tried to cover both the alleged problems as well as potential solutions, asking respondents to weigh in on if their careers have been impacted by the issues surfaced by the #MeToo and Time's Up movements and their ideas for how to make the industry more inclusive. We then interviewed more than 100 members across the industry to get their analysis through reported featured on the issues. To date, thousands of additional professionals both on and off LinkedIn have joined the larger conversation about the results and their implications for the American workplace.
  • In Donors We Trust

    This entry features the Detroit Free Press' innovative and exhaustive look into irregularities in the management of the University of Michigan’s $11 billion endowment. The years-long investigation detailed how executives at some of the nation's top investment firms donated hundreds of millions of dollars to the University of Michigan while the university in turn invested as much as $4 billion in those companies' funds. More than $400 million of that amount was sent into funds managed by three alumni who advise the university on the investments of its endowment. Critics who reviewed the newspaper’s computational and statistical analysis said Michigan’s approach of investing with some of its top donors, who also help guide the university's endowment, creates a conflict. After the publication of more than a dozen stories throughout 2018, the university reformed its conflict-of-interest rules; its president apologized for a lack in oversight; a member of its board of regents returned more than $20,000 in campaign contributions from an investment fund leader; and voters ousted both board incumbents running for re-election.
  • WTSP-TV/Tampa Bay Times: Zombie Campaigns

    More than 100 former federal politicians kept spending their campaign money long after leaving office, a multiplatform collaboration between the Tampa Bay Times and WTSP-TV revealed. In some cases, the campaigns kept spending even though the politician was dead.
  • The Center for Public Integrity: Local Voters, Distant Donors

    The Local Voters, Distant Donors series examined how support from across state lines shaped 2018’s elections as political redistricting decisions loom.
  • Tampa Bay Times/WTSP-TV: Zombie Campaigns

    More than 100 former federal politicians kept spending their campaign money long after leaving office, a multiplatform collaboration between the Tampa Bay Times and WTSP-TV revealed. In some cases, the campaigns kept spending even though the politician was dead.
  • Postmedia: Follow the Money

    Follow the Money is a data journalism project conceived by reporter Zane Schwartz as part of a year-long Postmedia fellowship. “I was frustrated by the way donations to politicians are recorded,” says Schwartz. “We know money matters in politics, but figuring out who is consistently giving that money to candidates and parties requires a level of detective-work out of reach for the average voter.” To address this gap, Schwartz worked with a team of journalists at Postmedia to create an accessible search tool for contributions at both the federal level and in every province and territory — a first of its kind.
  • The Daily Beast: Pay Dirt

    Pay Dirt is a weekly newsletter covering campaign finance, political influence, and corruption. These six stories, each of which led the newsletter for that day, covered a range of topics that shed light on the special interests trying to buy elections and influence American policymaking.
  • Michigan State University: Capital expenditure

    This project analyzed 2017 campaign finance data reported by Michigan state lawmakers. The initial intent was to determine how much of those funds came from special interest Political Action Committees rather than individual contributions. It blossomed into 10 stories that looked at such things as the difference in fundraising patterns between men and women, Republicans and Democrats. It ranked the partisanship of the state’s PACs, the largest PAC donors, the lawmakers who received the most and least, those who used the most of their own money and those who used no money at all. It discovered that the NRA spends very little on individual state lawmakers and those who break campaign finance laws rarely get hefty fines.