Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "fish" ...

  • CNBC: Oceans of Crime

    This is a crime story, set in the most open and lawless place on earth – the ocean. The perpetrators traffic in an illegal product – seafood. Their front-line workers are literally slaves. And almost anyone who buys salmon, canned tuna, or pet food is helping to fund this outlaw industry, whether they realize it or not. In this documentary about illegal fishing, CNBC illustrates the often shocking, unethical path much of our seafood takes from the water to our dinner plates, and what is being done to curb the often monumental abuses that occur along the way. Because illegal fishing is both a human rights and an environmental issue, CNBC’s goal was to explore the entire supply process and introduce all those involved – fishermen suffering abuse, the perpetrators, the would-be rescuers and enforcers, and the consumers who make it all possible, whether they know it or not.
  • Heroin Hits Home: A Search for Answers

    Ohio is ground zero of the heroin/opiate epidemic. More people die from overdoses in our state than any other (including California, which has three times our population.). WJW-Cleveland has covered the rise of the epidemic for years, but pivot here to where they think, at times, investigative journalism should go: searching for answers to problems that they reveal. In this case, those problems include: 1) a government policy that encourages doctors to prescribe more opiates in the middle of a heroin crisis; 2) a system that, on the federal level, treats marijuana very differently from opiates - many patients and some lawmakers believe legalized medical marijuana may well reduce the opiate epidemic; 3) a prioritization of public health policy that seems upside down: why is more money given to diseases that kill few Americans compared to one that is on track to become a "Vietnam" every year:? The DEA estimated 47,000 Americans would die from an overdose in 2016. Given that incredible number, they think that just reporting on the crisis as reporters do car accident deaths is today insufficient journalism. So we set out in a prime-time program to search for answers.
  • Season 1 from Someone Knows Something

    The true crime investigative podcast, Someone Knows Something (SKS), explores a different cold case every season. The first season delved into the mysterious case of five-year-old Adrien McNaughton, who vanished on a family fishing trip in 1972. SKS host David Ridgen, a celebrated documentarian and filmmaker, grew up in the same small town in Eastern Ontario as the McNaughton family. Through his investigation, Ridgen discovers new information about who was present at the lake that day, and uncovers a series of surprising new leads suggesting what might have happened to Adrien, including signals from four cadaver dogs, which suggest that there may be human remains in Holmes Lake, near where Adrien was fishing that day.
  • Exploited in Paradise

    Hundreds of foreign fishermen without visas are confined to American boats for years at a time in Hawaii, due to a federal loophole that allows them to work but exempts them from most basic labor protections.
  • Maine Power Grab

    A Bangor Daily News investigation found that hundreds of thousands of Maine customers of competitive electricity providers have paid $50 million more than they needed to for power since 2012.
  • Two Degrees

    In the lead-up to the Paris climate talks in December 2015, CNN’s John Sutter led months of coverage on one number -- 2 degrees Celsius -- that is key to the planet’s future. The series looked at the scientific basis for that target, which is regarded as the threshold for “dangerous” climate change and is measured as a temperature increase since the Industrial Revolution. It also explored what happens if we cross that mark and what it really will take to avoid that level of warming. http://www.cnn.com/specials/opinions/two-degrees http://www.cnn.com/interactive/2015/06/opinions/sutter-two-degrees-marshall-islands/
  • Evicted and Abandoned: The World Bank’s Broken Promise to the Poor

    Evicted and Abandoned is a global investigation that reveals how the World Bank Group, the powerful development lender committed to ending poverty, has regularly failed to follow its own rules for protecting vulnerable populations. The Center for Public Integrity’s International Consortium of Investigative Journalists teamed with the Huffington Post, the GroundTruth Project, the Investigative Fund, the Guardian and more than 20 other news organizations to develop this series of stories. In all, more than 80 journalists from 21 countries worked together to document the bank’s lapses and show their consequences for people around the globe. The reporting team traveled to affected communities in more than a dozen countries – including indigenous hamlets in the Peruvian Andes, fishing settlements along India’s northwest coast and a war-scarred village in Kosovo’s coal-mining belt. http://projects.huffingtonpost.com/projects/worldbank-evicted-abandoned
  • State of Terror

    In an unmatched examination of the Islamic State that began well before the attacks in Paris, The Times showed the secrets behind the group’s baffling resilience, tracking ISIS on battlefields in Syria, Libya and Iraq, and exposing its recruiting techniques, money trails and systematic policy of rape.
  • Fatal Shootings by Police

    The FBI keeps flawed data on people killed by police. So The Post logged every fatal shooting in 2015 -- and embarrassed the FBI into action
  • ESPN, Outside the Lines: “Pat Tillman: 10 Years Later an Enduring Tragedy"

    In the 10 years since the death of former NFL and Arizona State football player Pat Tillman in Afghanistan, none of the platoon mates who fired upon him had spoken publicly about the episode. In late 2013, ESPN’s Outside the Lines followed up its own original reporting on the fratricide, locating and contacting Tillman’s fellow Army Rangers who had acknowledged to investigators having fired upon his position. After multiple conversations with the Rangers over several months, one of the men who fired upon Tillman, Steven Elliott, agreed to break a decade of silence. That on-camera interview led to two April 2014 programs, the latest in OTL’s groundbreaking reporting about one of the most infamous friendly-fire deaths in U.S. military history.