Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "fishing" ...

  • CNBC: Oceans of Crime

    This is a crime story, set in the most open and lawless place on earth – the ocean. The perpetrators traffic in an illegal product – seafood. Their front-line workers are literally slaves. And almost anyone who buys salmon, canned tuna, or pet food is helping to fund this outlaw industry, whether they realize it or not. In this documentary about illegal fishing, CNBC illustrates the often shocking, unethical path much of our seafood takes from the water to our dinner plates, and what is being done to curb the often monumental abuses that occur along the way. Because illegal fishing is both a human rights and an environmental issue, CNBC’s goal was to explore the entire supply process and introduce all those involved – fishermen suffering abuse, the perpetrators, the would-be rescuers and enforcers, and the consumers who make it all possible, whether they know it or not.
  • Season 1 from Someone Knows Something

    The true crime investigative podcast, Someone Knows Something (SKS), explores a different cold case every season. The first season delved into the mysterious case of five-year-old Adrien McNaughton, who vanished on a family fishing trip in 1972. SKS host David Ridgen, a celebrated documentarian and filmmaker, grew up in the same small town in Eastern Ontario as the McNaughton family. Through his investigation, Ridgen discovers new information about who was present at the lake that day, and uncovers a series of surprising new leads suggesting what might have happened to Adrien, including signals from four cadaver dogs, which suggest that there may be human remains in Holmes Lake, near where Adrien was fishing that day.
  • Evicted and Abandoned: The World Bank’s Broken Promise to the Poor

    Evicted and Abandoned is a global investigation that reveals how the World Bank Group, the powerful development lender committed to ending poverty, has regularly failed to follow its own rules for protecting vulnerable populations. The Center for Public Integrity’s International Consortium of Investigative Journalists teamed with the Huffington Post, the GroundTruth Project, the Investigative Fund, the Guardian and more than 20 other news organizations to develop this series of stories. In all, more than 80 journalists from 21 countries worked together to document the bank’s lapses and show their consequences for people around the globe. The reporting team traveled to affected communities in more than a dozen countries – including indigenous hamlets in the Peruvian Andes, fishing settlements along India’s northwest coast and a war-scarred village in Kosovo’s coal-mining belt. http://projects.huffingtonpost.com/projects/worldbank-evicted-abandoned
  • Outdoors grant investigation

    The investigation detailed how a handful of political insiders engineered a $500,000 hunting and fishing grant in perpetuity for some of their friends and political supporters. The taxpayer-funded grant from the state of Wisconsin went for teaching and promoting the sports of hunting and fishing, but the newly created receiving organization, the United Sportsmen, didn’t have any experience doing that work. Instead, the group had been doing political work and lobbying, often for goals at odds with those of some other outdoors groups, such as supporting a massive proposed pit mine in an area used by hunters and anglers. In spite of that, lawmakers wrote the grant qualifications to exclude more experienced groups and target their ally, which had the support of one of the state’s wealthiest and most influential campaign donors. In doing so, the lawmakers knowingly but surreptitiously put at risk millions of dollars in federal conservation funds for Wisconsin.
  • ICIJ: Plunder in the Pacific

    "Plunder in the Pacific," an eight-country investigation, revealed how Asian, European and Latin American fleets have devastated what was once one of the world’s great fish stocks. Jack mackerel in the South Pacific has decreased from around 30 million tons to less than three tons in just two decades. We found that national interests and geopolitical rivalry for six years blocked efforts to ratify a regional fisheries management organization that could impose binding regulations to rescue jack mackerel from further collapse. Bound only by voluntary restrictions, fleets competed in what amounted to a free-for-all in no man’s water.
  • United in Largesse

    United in Largesse is about extravagant spending and lack of accountability in the International Brotherhood of Boilermakers union, which has its headquarters in Kansas City, Kan. The Kansas City Star found that the union president’s salary and expenses far topped those of the presidents of the country’s largest unions and that the union had hired numerous officers’ relatives at robust salaries. The story also showed that union officials traveled by charter or first class to attractive destinations, squandered money on exclusive pheasant-hunting expeditions and Alaskan fly-fishing adventures and gave expensive cars as gifts to retiring officers. The Star also raised serious questions about conflicts of interest involving union pension fund trustees.
  • Fishing For Business

    A look at Illinois' program to give state contract money to business owned by minorities, women and people with disabilities. The state claims to have one of the best records in the nation when it comes to doing business with diverse companies, but our investigation shows that large departments are failing to meet goals year after year and evidence shows that the state may be influencing how well it is doing by circumventing the system.
  • Looting the Seas II

    Following the award winner report, Looting the Seas, this follow up investigation looks at the Spanish fishing industry.
  • Looting the Seas: How Overfishing, Fraud and Negligence Plundered the Majestic Bluefin Tuna

    "A groundbreaking, multimedia expose on the $4 billion black market in bluefin tuna, the world's most coveted source of sushi." From professional fisheries to tuna farms in the Mediterranean and N. Africa, the business was "riddled with fraud, negligence, and criminal misconduct."
  • Net Gains and Losses

    The largest commercial harvester of menhaden, an obscure fish used for fishmeal and fertilizer, may be wiping out the fish to extinction.