Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "flight" ...

  • Tailspin

    “Tailspin” uncovered the financial, legal and security problems inside a fast-growing private jet company named JetSmarter. The private jet world gets little scrutiny, protected by a tightknit group of companies and elite customers. JetSmarter became the darling of the media and industry, led by a charismatic CEO and hyped by celebrities on social media. But our investigation found that the company sold memberships that quickly proved to be worthless. Its CEO touted its success as the first “flying unicorn” worth $1.5 billion, but we found JetSmarter was losing millions of dollars a month.
  • Guns in Airports, Passengers Packing Heat

    2018 set a record for people trying to carry guns through airport TSA checkpoints. 4,239 guns were found in carry-on bags at airports across the country, that’s 12 guns every day. 86% of those guns were loaded. Our 11-month investigation focused on who was attempting to take firearms through security checkpoints and examined why there has been such a sharp increase in the numbers of weapons found in airports in recent years.
  • Military.com: Aviators Kicked Out

    The U.S. military prides itself on its colorblind attitude to race and its increasing diversity. Why, then, does the field of naval aviation remain overwhelmingly white, and less diverse in some areas now than two decades ago? Three black aviators who share remarkably similar stories of getting expelled from the training pipeline say unconscious bias is to blame. These former trainees, some of whom remain in appeals with the Navy, say they're just as good as their white peers, and an instructor backs their assertions. Investigations, formal complaints, and a troubling aviation instructors' chat history paint a picture of an environment that dooms minority aviators from the moment they set foot on the flightline.
  • L.A. Times: Danger Spins From the Sky

    Robinson Helicopter Co., the world’s leading maker of civilian helicopters, is an American aviation success story – with a deadly 45-year history. The Los Angeles Times provided the first comprehensive examination of the company’s safety record, and the design features and flight characteristics that have dogged Robinson helicopters for decades.
  • Fueling the Fire: Dave Repsher

    Dave Repsher burned in post-helicopter crash fire in 2015, because the system designed to protect flight nurses and other helicopter passengers failed. Three years later, KUSA-TV's "Fueling the Fire" investigation changed that system by inspiring a change in federal law.
  • Boston Globe: Quiet Skies

    Spotlight fellow Jana Winter received a tip in June that TSA was running a rogue -- and possibly illegal -- new domestic surveillance program in which US citizens not under investigation or on any terrorist watchlist were followed at the airport and in-flight by air marshals who then filed detailed reports about their behavior.
  • 60 Minutes: Flying Under the Radar

    On April 15th 2018, CBS News 60 MINUTES featured a two-part investigation into the safety record of one of the country’s most profitable airlines, Allegiant Air, a small, ultra-low-cost carrier based in Las Vegas. Over the course of seven months, correspondent Steve Kroft and his producers analyzed hundreds of federal aviation documents and interviewed pilots, mechanics and industry experts for a report that raised disturbing questions about the safety of Allegiant’s fleet. Although Allegiant flies less than 100 planes, our investigation found that over a 20-month period, the airline experienced over 100 serious mechanical problems, including mid-air engine failures, cabin depressurization, smoke in the cabin, flight control malfunctions, hydraulic leaks and aborted take-offs. The incidents forced Allegiant pilots to declare 46 in-flight emergencies and 60 unscheduled landings. Our expert sources said this was a remarkably high number of incidents for an airline this size.
  • My Brother's Bomber

    Who was really responsible for one of the worst terrorist attacks on Americans before 9/11? Broadcast as a three-part, serial investigation into the 1988 Lockerbie bombing, “My Brother’s Bomber” takes viewers on a journey to find the men who carried out the terrorist bombing of Pan Am Flight 103—an attack that killed 270 people from some twenty countries, including the filmmaker’s older brother David Dornstein. http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/film/my-brothers-bomber/ http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/film/my-brothers-bomber/#video-2 http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/film/my-brothers-bomber/#video-3
  • FUELING THE FIRE

    Buried beneath a mix of federal bureaucracy and ambivalence is a story that explains why thousands of helicopters in use today remain vulnerable to the very same problem that doomed a Flight for Life crew in Frisco, Colorado, earlier this year. For five months, 9Wants to Know analyzed hundreds of NTSB accident reports in an effort to better understand what’s “fueling the fire.” Based heavily upon a combination of interviews with victims and researchers, our conclusions have generated interest within the aviation industry and Congress, and will form the basis of a national discussion that is finally underway. https://vimeo.com/151435468 https://vimeo.com/149457398
  • Crosswind Dangers at DIA

    Denver International Airport control tower operators have been putting passenger safety in jeopardy on about one thousand flights a year by green-lighting take-offs in high crosswind conditions without warning pilots. A commercial jetliner crashed and burned in 2008 as a result of crosswinds at DIA, but despite that event, the FAA refuses to change its procedures.