Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "generals" ...

  • The Afghanistan Paper

    A confidential trove of government documents obtained by the Washington Post revealed that senior U.S. government officials systematically failed to tell the truth about the war in Afghanistan for the duration of the 18-year conflict. The documents, obtained in response to two FOIA lawsuits, showed in raw, unfiltered detail that senior officials privately concluded the war had become unwinnable even as three U.S. presidents and other government leaders kept insisting publicly - year after year - they were making progress and would prevail.
  • Opening the black box of Egypt's slush funds

    This exposé of massive corruption in Egypt at the hands of the country's military rulers and loyalists of the failed Mubarak regime launches a partnership between the Washington DC-based non-profit Angaza Foundation for Africa Reporting (TAFAR) and Africa Confidential, the longest-established English-language publication on Africa. Entitled "Opening the black box of Egypt's slush funds", the story details how Egyptian generals and senior government officials use a complex network of slush funds as their private piggy banks, siphoning off billions of dollars from the country to top-up salaries and maintain networks of political allegiances. It also describes how recent attempts to investigate these so-called special funds have led to cover-ups, including Egyptian police allegedly stealing records implicating them in the misuse of their own funds. This “deep dive” report exposing mishandled slush funds, financial cover-ups, and massive corruption in Egypt was edited by former veteran Reuters correspondent Bernd Debusman, and overseen by TAFAR’s President and Executive Director Bobby Block, a Wall Street Journal veteran. https://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/egypt/2015-06-26/sisi-and-his-40-thieves
  • Government: Exposed and Accountable

    This series seeks to hold government accountable and expose undue government secrecy when it occurs. 28 Pages tells the little known story of the redacted parts of the Congressional investigation into 9/11, fourteen years after the fact. Viral Threat is our original investigation into a medical mystery the CDC doesn’t want to talk about. We discovered a strong link between an emerging polio-like virus and a new disease that’s paralyzed children nationwide. In Afghan Oasis, we investigate the maddening taxpayer waste surrounding “64k”: a U.S. military building the military didn’t ask for, said it wouldn’t use and never occupied. $36 million was spent over the objections of generals on the ground. Running on “E” is our original look at how close the Obama administration got to its goal of putting one million electric vehicles on the road by 2015. https://youtu.be/Vf6ZKLe9xoo
  • Under Fire: Discrimination and Corruption in the Texas National Guard

    The Texas National Guard had developed a culture of harassment, humiliation and undue punishment for young women serving in the force. Findings on the practices resulted in the discharge of three commanding Generals. KHOU fought an uphill battle to gain trust of Guard members who have been conditioned to distrust the media.
  • Under Fire: Discrimination and Corruption in the Texas National Guard

    The Texas National Guard had developed a culture of harassment, humiliation and undue punishment for young women serving in the force. Findings on the practices resulted in the discharge of three commanding Generals. KHOU fought an uphill battle to gain trust of Guard members who have been conditioned to distrust the media.
  • Four Stars for Hire

    Retired senior officers are been hired by the US military as senior mentors. These mentors counsel current commanders and run war games. Further, the mentors are being paid at rates much higher than the active-duty officers. Also, they are not just working for the military; many are employed by defense contractors. So these mentors are not only being paid large sums by the US government, they are also receiving income from the defense firms.
  • SLICC Deal for Pentagon Brass, Pimp My Ride -- Air Force Edition,

    In June 2008, sources came to the Project on Government Oversight about the Air Force wasting taxpayer funds. They presented documents and e-mails that raised questions about two little-known programs to build "world-class" luxury aircraft accommodations for the military and senior civilian leadership. The accommodations -- called SLICC (Snior Leader In-transit Conference Capsule) and SLIP (Senior Leader In-transit Pallet) -- were justified as filling a "deficiency gap," but e-mails obtained by POGO showed that there was significant internal dissent within the Air Force over this extravagant waste of taxpayers' funds. Requirements documents obtained by POGO emphasize the need for "aesthetically pleasing" accommodations. E-mails obtained by POGO state that Air Force generals upgraded the leather, carpet, and wood choices, adding hundreds of thousands of dollars to the program cost. After the first FLIP was procured, General Robert McMahon expressed dissatisfaction with the color of the seat leather and type of wood used. He directed that the leather be reupholstered from brown to Air Force blue leather, and requested to replace the wood originally used with cherry. Internal Air Force e-mails make it clear that the Air Force leadership's overriding concern us SLICC's level of luxury. Contract documents obtained by POGO revealed that these accommodations do not provide any additional operational capabilities (e.g. communications advantages) beyond those currently existing.
  • JAGs Change with Military

    The National Law Journal reports on JAGs, which are judge advocate generals in the military. This "third court system" involves a criminal justice system composed of nearly 4,000 active-duty military lawyers.
  • Unequal justice

    Pound reports on flaws in the military justice system. The story reveals "a standard of fairness inferior to that guaranteed to accused criminals in America's civilian courts" and "a pattern of shocking abuse and injustice," according to the contest questionnaire. The system hits average enlisted men and women, while generals and admirals are rarely, if ever, tried.
  • Tarnished Guardians

    USA Today looks at patterns of misconduct in the top echelons of the National Guard. The two-part series finds that some adjutant generals, who are the Guard's highest ranking officials in each state, have been involved in sexual harassment cases, retaliation against subordinates who complain and embezzlement of taxpayers' money. The investigation identifies faulty officers in at ;east nine state - New York, Illinois, Kentucky, California, Mississippi, Oklahoma, Colorado, Wyoming and Massachusetts. A major finding is that between 10% and 20% of the soldiers on the rolls are "ghosts" who seldom - if ever - attend the drills. The stories examine how this inflated numbers can endanger the public security. Another finding is that the National Guard constitutes a formidable lobbying power, and that it has never lost its financing despite Pentagon's efforts to shortcut its budget.