Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "homeland" ...

  • Newsweek: 2018 U.S. Military Southern Border Deployment

    An investigation into President Donald Trump's decision to deploy thousands of military troops to the southern border as a caravan of migrants travel to the U.S. in search of asylum.
  • The Intercept: Detained, then Violated

    The Intercept obtained hundreds of complaints of sexual and physical abuse in immigration detention, in response to a public records request with the Department of Homeland Security’s Office of Inspector General, which is tasked with independently reviewing the department’s various agencies, including ICE and Border Patrol.
  • Unsettling

    The federal government oversees a complex program to help refugees come to this country. But the effort does not always live up to promises, potentially making the path more difficult for refugees striving to adapt to their new homeland. Audits, financial filings and internal government reports indicate that a significant number of government-funded charities contracted to help the newcomers are misspending money, an NYCity News Service examination of hundreds of documents found. Promised services are delayed or never delivered, medical care is often postponed beyond guidelines and program oversight can lag. http://unsettling.nycitynewsservice.com/
  • Spies in the Skies

    America is being watched from above. Government surveillance planes, operated by the FBI and the Department of Homeland Security, routinely circle over most major cities. We assembled an unprecedented picture of the operation’s scale and sweep by analyzing more than 4 months of aircraft tracking data for about 200 federal aircraft.
  • Missing Airport ID’s

    This investigation revealed hundreds of airport ID’s have been lost or stolen at some of the nation’s busiest airports. Some missing badges were not deactivated for days or weeks because employees or companies failed to notify airport police. Those badges allow workers to bypass security screening and access the most secure areas unchecked. As a result of our reports, a bi-partisan group of U.S. Senators has introduced a bill that directs the TSA to increase fines for airports, airport workers and employers who fail to report badges lost or stolen right away. And it requires all large U.S. airports to notify Congress if more than 3% of an airport’s ID’s are missing. Our reporting also prompted the Department of Homeland Security Inspector General to launch an ongoing review of lost and stolen ID’s. Our team produced and reported the story for NBC Nightly News and the TODAY Show, bringing our findings to a national audience.
  • The Pentagon’s $10-Billion Bet Gone Bad

    This body of work is the result of reporter David Willman’s investigations of the nation’s dauntingly complex missile-defense programs. The articles reveal how program after program was sold to Congress based on false and misleading claims – ultimately amounting to waste on a grand scale. The U.S. spent $2.2 billion alone for a giant, floating radar that was supposed to scan the skies for long-range missiles from North Korea or other “rogue” nations. But the radar spends most of the year mothballed at Pearl Harbor – and has never docked at its intended Alaskan berth. The “SBX” radar, Willman reported, will never fulfill its intended strategic mission.
  • Homeland Insecurity

    Dozens of U.S. border agents have been caught in recent years illegally smuggling weapons, drugs, or people into the United States. Melissa del Bosque and Patrick Michels investigate why so few of them have been disciplined or punished. In their mindboggling tale of broken accountability at the Department of Homeland Security, Michels and del Bosque find that a broken chain of command, turf wars, grueling caseloads, and a lack of internal accountability at the DHS Office of Inspector General have allowed potentially corrupt agents to remain employed for years on our nation's border with Mexico.
  • PSTA-Driving Outside the Lines

    An Investigation into the Pinellas Suncoast Transit Authority showing it knowingly created an illegal plan to use a $354,000 Homeland Security Grant to promote a tax increase. As we got deeper into looking at the agency we found maintenance problems the agency tried to cover up and lie about and drivers on the road who should not have been behind the wheel
  • Stop and Seize: Cops and the Cash They Confiscate

    After Sept. 11, 2001, federal authorities asked local and state police to serve as their eyes and ears on America's highways. The departments of Justice and Homeland Security, along with state agencies, spent millions to train them in an aggressive technique known as highway interdiction. But it soon became something else: Dragnets that swept up the criminal and innocent alike in a search for money. The Washington Post series revealed one of the great unknown consequences of 9/11. Local and state police, working through a Justice program called Equitable Sharing, have made nearly 62,000 cash seizures totally $2.5 billion since 9/11, without warrants or criminal charges.
  • Brian Ross Investigates: Al Qaeda in Kentucky

    This exclusive ABC News investigation found that American counterterrorism officials were investigating more than a dozen cases of possible terrorists who have slipped into the U.S. under the refugee program. With rare access inside current and ongoing major terrorism investigations, the in-depth investigative reports broadcast on "Nightline," "World News with Diane Sawyer" and "Good Morning America" told the story of how a little noticed arrest of two men in Kentucky led to a major national security investigation that commanded the attention of top officials, including President Obama. The Iraqis were not refugees fleeing persecution, as they had claimed to immigration authorities, but were al Qaeda-iraq terrorists who had targeted U.S. troops in northern Iraq with bombs and sniper attacks. A key piece of evidence was that the fingerprints of one defendant were located on an improvised explosive device stored in a box for six years in an FBI warehouse, which had been found buried in a Baiji, Iraq road by American soldiers in September 2005. Worse, the two Iraqi insurgents, who had lied their way into the U.S. as alleged refugees -- and escaped drawing scrutiny until they were serttled in Kentucky -- were plotting to ship- heavy arms back to Iraq in an FBI sting, and were also discussing U.S. Homeland revenge bombings, the FBI learned. ABC News was able not only to tell the story of this incredible counterterrorism investigation by the FBI with help from the U.S. military, but also connect a specific bombing in Baiji that killed four Pennsylvania National Guardsmen to the Iraqi defendants. The exclusive ABC News investigation, which was broadcast on the network's three major newscasts as well as online with stories and web extra videos, also broke the news of current FBI counterterrorism investigations of suspects inside the U.S. whose fingerprints are being checked with those lifted from devices in evidence at the FBI's secret "bomb library," where ABC News was shown 100,000 IEDs collected from warzones in Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Yemen, Somalia and elsewhere.