Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "identity" ...

  • Documentary Window (The Moles)

    During Japanese colonial rule (1910-1945), Korean independence activists established the Provisional Government of the Republic of Korea. This year marks the 100th anniversary of the Provisional Government. Even to this day, Korea and Japan are in constant conflict over unresolved historical issues, most notably the comfort women. Hence, the pro-Japanese issues remain an important agenda for the Korean government. Although various research has been conducted on these pro-Japanese groups, there is a dearth of studies on Korean spies who hid their identity and collaborated with the Japanese, with very few academic papers on the subject. The KBS documentary seeks to illuminate the true nature of the Korean spies who had infiltrated the independence movement camp and sold out their own people to the Japanese.
  • Dead or Alive

    Scott Pelley reports on the thousands of errors to the Social Security Administration's Death Master File. Such mistakes can result in continued payments in the names of the dead not on the list and identity headaches for those mistakenly put on the list who are very much alive.
  • Investigating the IRS: "Borrowing" Your Identity

    This 5-month WTHR investigation exposed how the IRS has ignored millions of cases of blatant identity theft while mandating its employees to keep victims in the dark. WTHR’s investigative team traveled across the nation to uncover confidential policies the IRS had successfully kept secret for more than a decade, allowing millions of taxpayers to become victims and putting millions more at risk. The investigation triggered immediate action in Congress and at the IRS.
  • The iScheme

    9NEWS caught an iPhone scheme on camera that targets the homeless and the desperate with promises of quick cash. The news investigation revealed the identity of people who use “credit mules” to get new iPhones at Apple stores so they could be sold for exorbitant profits on the internal market.
  • The Tax Refund Scam

    All con artists need is a computer and an easily obtained list of stolen social security numbers to perpetrate a scam that has cost the U.S. Treasury billions of dollars in fraudulent tax refunds. Steve Kroft reports on this scam that is getting out of hand because the IRS hasn't found a way to stop it.
  • Informants

    “Informants” tells the stories of three paid FBI informants who posed as Muslims as they searched for people interested in joining violent plots concocted by the FBI. With extraordinary access to FBI agents and their informants, as well as undercover recordings, Al Jazeera’s documentary raises questions about whether the men targeted would have acted at all were it not for the paid informants working on the cases. It also brings into question one of the government’s favored domestic counter-terrorism tools after 9/11. The film features never-before-seen video from FBI undercover sting operations and interviews with three former FBI informants; reveals new information about the crimes FBI informants committed while working for the government; exposes how the FBI targeted one young man for recruitment as an informant; features an exclusive interview with a man convicted on terrorism charges in one of the highest-profile federal cases of the last decade; and reveals the identity of one of the FBI’s secret informants. “Informants” is an evocative documentary that breaks new ground covering and questioning U.S. national security policy.
  • Should we “Fix” Intersex Children?

    This story showed how a lack of oversight is allowing doctors to carry out risky cosmetic surgeries on young children with intersex conditions. Around one in 2,000 children are born with sex organs that are not entirely male or female. The story focused on one of these children, ‘M’ who was born with an intersex condition and whose penis was cut off as a toddler to make him look like a girl. He is now ten and identifies as a boy. As well as the risk of assigning a child the wrong gender, these surgeries have a gut-wrenching list of side-effects including painful scarring, reduced sexual sensitivity, torn genital tissue, removal of natural hormones and possible sterilization. This story found that doctors have been aware of these risks since the 1990s when many advocates, adults and some within the medical profession called on the surgeries to be heavily restricted, but that many doctors continue to perform these operations.
  • Coca-Cola vandal caught

    Sometimes the journalism gods drop a big scoop in your lap. That's what happened to me and the identity of an infamous vandal at American University. After months reporting on these cases of vandalism, one Public Safety official came forward and gave us all the information on the case. I knew it was my responsibility to follow-up, verify the information, and educate the campus community that the vandal had been caught.
  • Privacy on the Line

    “Privacy on the Line” documented security breaches and fraud in the implementation of a $2 billion federal phone subsidy for low-income families. We found tens of thousands of applicants to Lifeline, were put at heightened risk for identity theft when more than 170,000 sensitive records were posted publicly online. While researching companies participating in the Lifeline program, Scripps investigative reporter Isaac Wolf discovered a data breach touching residents of 26 states.
  • Fragile Lives, Needless Deaths

    We found that scores of developmentally disabled people in the state's care had died in recent years from abuse, neglect or medical error - from bathtub scaldings to chokings to ignored illnesses. Although the state keeps secret the identity of those who die under their oversight, we were able to identify nearly every victim and told many of their stories, giving a name and a fact to an often-ignored population.