Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "illness" ...

  • In the hot seat

    When reporters at NBC News began probing OSHA severe injury data in February 2019, an interesting takeaway emerged: UPS had a higher rate of heat injuries than any other company. At least 107 UPS workers in 23 states had been hospitalized for heat illnesses since 2015. In severe cases, heat can lead to organ failure and death. But regulators have little enforcement ability on this issue because there is no OSHA standard protecting workers from heat--even as climate change brings record-breaking temperatures. NBC News filed more than two dozen public records requests for state-level data -- to supplement the federal OSHA data -- and hundreds of pages of incident reports, and spoke with dozens of UPS employees, uncovering a corporate culture that exacerbated the problem. Long hours, heavy routes, fear of retaliation and sweltering trucks and warehouses pushed workers workers past their limits. Managers pushing workers to continue working when sick, and employees too intimidated to report their injuries. UPS claimed that their iconic brown trucks do not get dangerously hot, but NBC News sent five temperature loggers in packages across the country, during one of the hottest weeks of the summer. The results showed that each package exceeded 100 degrees while on a truck, with one hitting nearly 115 degrees. Drivers around the country also sent us images of temperature readings they took in their own trucks -- the hottest clocked in at 158 degrees. Between rising temperatures and the growing demands of the two-day delivery economy, dozens of UPS drivers said conditions are getting worse. Follow up stories uncovered additional injuries and more examples of UPS poorly protecting its workers from the heat. Following our story, OSHA fined UPS for a heat injury for the first time in nearly a decade.
  • WNYC: New Jersery Jail Deaths

    This three-part radio series exposed New Jersey jails as among the deadliest in the nation, with no consistent method of accountability.
  • The Virginian-Pilot: Jailed in Crisis

    In a first-of-it’s-kind investigation, the Virginian-Pilot tracked down more than 400 cases across the country in which people with mental illness died in jails, documenting the scope of a tragedy that’s been unfolding for decades: too many people are being jailed instead of treated and many are dying in horrific ways and under preventable circumstances. The series goes on to detail how so many people ended up in jails because of a lack of mental health services and how some municipalities are finding ways to get them into treatment. The investigation prompted long-delayed action by the U.S. Justice Department to address the conditions for people with mental illness in the Hampton Roads Regional Jail in Portsmouth, Virginia.
  • The Marshall Project and USA TODAY NETWORK - Tennessee: Too Sick for Jail — But Not for Solitary

    “Too Sick for Jail — But Not for Solitary” revealed for the first time the devastating toll of Tennessee’s “safekeeper” law that puts people in solitary confinement who are mentally ill, pregnant or juveniles despite not being convicted of any crime — and sparked prompt changes to the state’s 150-year-old law.
  • Role of Obama-era school discipline policies in Parkland massacre

    Most news media neglected a huge part of the Parkland school massacre. They did so by focusing largely on the roles played by gun laws and mental illness in Nikolas Cruz’s rampage. Paul Sperry went against the grain, in a series of reports for RealClearInvestigations that exposed a central factor in the horror: an Obama-era push that made school discipline more lenient across the country because of concerns that minority students, especially African-Americans, were being disciplined at much higher rates than other Americans. Sperry was the first to report, and to comprehensively detail, this broad and ultimately misguided effort to end the “school to prison pipeline.”
  • RMPBS "Insight with John Ferrugia" - "Imminent Danger"

    This project examines the issue of killings by mentally ill persons with access to guns. The story is told through the eyes of a mother whose mentally ill son murdered a sheriff’s deputy and wounded four others, and of the Sheriff whose deputy died. Both agree the confrontation could have been avoided if only state law allowed earlier intervention when a mentally ill person with access to guns is spinning out of control. Both did everything possible to head off the crisis, but had no legal tools to prevent it. The project also includes an exclusive interview with the parents of Aurora Theater killer James Holmes who explain they simply did not recognize the warning signs that their son was mentally ill and capable of homicide. They hold themselves responsible for their son’s mass murder.
  • ProPublica and Frontline: The Right To Fail

    As part of a landmark 2014 settlement, hundreds of people with severe mental illness were moved from troubled group homes and into their own “supported housing” apartments. The idea was that, even if they had spent most of their lives in institutions, dependent on others for food, shelter and a medication regimen, a robust safety net of service providers would help them navigate independence. While many reporters have exposed problems at institutions, ProPublica’s Joaquin Sapien and Frontline’s Tom Jennings took an unprecedented look at what has been heralded as the solution — independent housing. They learned that though many are thriving, the sudden shift was sometimes perilous, especially for the most fragile residents.
  • Kaiser Health News: Unlocked and Loaded: Families Confront Guns and Dementia

    In the U.S., where gun violence kills 96 people each day, there has been vigorous debate about how to stop the carnage, including ways to prevent people with mental illness from acquiring and owning firearms. But an unacknowledged and potentially far bigger problem is what to do about the vast cache of firearms in the homes of aging Americans with dementia. Our four-month investigation, produced in partnership with PBS Newshour, shed new light on an aspect of guns and public health that no one talks about, even though it may affect millions of Americans.
  • BLAME: Lost at Home

    BLAME: Lost at Home is an investigative series that unravels the case of a man who was missing for more than a year before he was finally found in his own living room.
  • Food Plight: Cafeteria Inspections Reveal Critical Health Violations at New York City Schools

    Our reporters scoured reams of health inspection records and discovered that nearly half of New York City public school cafeterias were hit with at least one critical violation in 2017. A closer look found that the four dozen schools with the worst inspections records largely serve some of the city’s poorest students. The most sickening cases include schools where 600 rodent droppings and 1,500 flies were found in food preparation and consumption areas – conditions that are breeding grounds for potentially dangerous food-borne illnesses. Our team of students conceived of the story and used the data, obtained from the New York City Health Department under New York’s Freedom of Information Law, to create a filterable interactive graphic that parents can use to uncover details of violations found at their child’s school.