Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "impairment" ...

  • Reuters: Ambushed at Home

    A Reuters investigation revealed a toxic scourge on some of America’s largest military installations, where failure to maintain privatized housing exposed children to lead, a toxin that can stunt brain development and cause lifelong impairment.
  • Ambushed at Home

    A Reuters investigation revealed a toxic scourge on some of America’s largest military installations, where failure to maintain privatized housing exposed children to lead, a toxin that can stunt brain development and cause lifelong impairment.
  • The Kindness of Strangers: Inside Elder Guardianship in Florida

    With an estimated 50 percent of Americans 85 and older experiencing cognitive impairment, the longevity boom has generated an increase in the number of elders who are deemed too frail or mentally compromised to handle their affairs. Most states, including Florida, have cobbled together an efficient way to identify and care for helpless elders, using the probate court system to place them under guardianship. But critics say this system – easily set in motion, notoriously difficult to stop – often ignores basic civil rights. They describe a ruthless determination to take elders from their homes and make them conform to a process by which their belongings can be sold, and their family and friends shut out—until eventually they are locked away in institutions to decline and die. The critics call this process “liquidate, isolate, medicate.” Through case studies, examining court documents and talking to those working for elder justice reform, the Sarasota Herald-Tribune found consistent patterns of a lack of due process, an unwillingness to inform and involve family members, a one-size-fits-all approach to elders with diverse levels of capacity, substandard care for wards who lack assets, and high legal and professional fees for wards who have considerable assets. Fundamentally, the system treats elders as second-class citizens, before stripping them of citizenship altogether and rendering them as non-persons.
  • Blackout

    Halsne found that Washington drivers with severe medical impairments, such as diabetes, were again and again given immunity following serious auto accidents. Washington law does not restrict licenses of drivers who have a long history of blackouts. KIRO-TV profiled a diabetic who sent a total of 9 innocent victims to the hospital in 3 car wrecks. KIRO found eight-thousand medically impaired drivers are allowed to keep their licenses year after year.
  • System Failure

    These stories reveal how an alcoholic cardiologist was able to continue practicing for several years. Although he was charged with several alcohol-related traffic offenses and would occasionally show up at the hospital under the influence of alcohol, the system still allowed him to practice. These articles examine the flaws in the system, reveal serious lapses by state officials and document of the doctor's dangerous and illegal activities.
  • Condition Critical: Code of Silence

    WTLV TV-12 "examined the code of silence among doctors, exposed examples of the medical risks it poses to patients and ultimately showed the economic downside for physicians whenever they break that code of silence. ... in one case.. Jacksonville's largest provider of cardiovascular services, St. Vincent's Medical Center, allowed its Chief of Cardiac Surgery to operate on patients despite a severe drinking problem spanning more than a decade ... a drinking problem widely known to the hospital's administration and medical staff.... Our series of investigative reports uncovered a pattern of unchecked power, corruption, cover-up, criminal conduct... even death in the O-R."
  • Damaged

    Dorothy Lewis, a psychiatrist, and Jonathan Pincus, a neurologist, worked together to develop a new theory about violence. They agree that abuse, in and of itself, does not necessarily result in violence, any more than neurological impairment or psychosis does. Lewis and Pinus argue, however, that if you mix these conditions they become dangerous. The philosophical implications of their arguments are discussed.