Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "indictments" ...

  • Addiction Treatment: Inside the gold rush

    Flying beneath the radar, Palm Beach County’s thriving addiction treatment industry, one of the nation’s largest, is exploiting vulnerable addicts seeking help, gouging insurers and families and engaging in fraud, all in pursuit of outlandish profits from simple drug screen tests. The Palm Beach Post exposed industry practices as an FBI task force secretly gathered evidence toward indictments still not issued as of January 2016. The Post exposed out-of-control sober home operators Ken Bailynson and Kenny Chatman and gave the community its first look deep into the industry’s sordid underbelly. https://github.com/PalmBeachPost/postgeo https://github.com/PalmBeachPost/dbfs2csv
  • Sepp Blatter & FIFA (A League of His Own)

    In “A League of His Own,” Bloomberg Businessweek demonstrated for the first time that the long-rumored corruption at FIFA, soccer's governing body, was part of the system of governance itself, and served to keep Sepp Blatter, its president, in power. Less than a month after the story ran, indictments in the U.S., and raids in Switzerland, confirmed our reporters’ findings, and Blatter resigned.
  • Reinvestigating Rape

    The Plain Dealer and Cleveland.com have been reporting on rape kit testing for five years. They put their first public records request in to the Cleveland police department in 2009 and have followed up every step of the way as kits in thousands of rape cases have been counted, submitted for testing and as rape cases have been re-investigated leading to more than 240 indictments, at least a third of them in serial rape cases.
  • DeKalb County's Climate of Corruption

    This investigation revealed a local government teeming with corruption, including kickbacks and theft of taxpayer dollars. They exposed rampant spending with no oversight, first through the use of county purchasing cards, then with an invoice payment system that also lacked controls. Their investigation caught county officials spending their discretionary budgets on airline tickets, family vacations, gift cards, cell phone bills, high-end electronics and other personal expenses. One commissioner even paid a speeding ticket and funneled tens of thousands of dollars to her boyfriend. Their reporting led to an ongoing FBI investigation, a guilty plea from a longtime county official, and pending subpoenas that could yield even more indictments. County leaders have enacted new spending policies and strengthened their board of ethics.
  • They Died At The Hands of Cops

    Following a Staten Island grand jury’s decision on Dec. 3, 2014 to not indict the officer involved in the death of Eric Garner, the New York Daily News set out to determine just how often NYPD officers had suffered criminal repercussions for killing another person. With protests mounting, the demand for answers in our community was great. The newspaper marshaled its projects team, two senior courts reporters and a police reporter to answer this key question as quickly as possible. The paper’s findings — that NYPD officers had killed at least 179 people while on duty over the past 15 years, and that indictments had been brought in just three cases, leading to one conviction and no jail time — stunned the city and became an integral part of the larger debate over how these cases should be prosecuted.
  • Investigation of a Community Health Center

    With an infusion of $11 billion, the 1,300 community health centers across the U.S. have been hailed as the backbone of the Affordable Care Act’s plan to leave no one without health care. That’s a lot of money to accomplish a lot of good. It’s also a lot of money to tempt those with larcenous intent. Two years ago, Alabama Media Group discovered that two community health centers -- Birmingham Health Care and Central Alabama Comprehensive Health -- had paid more than $2 million for contracts to companies owned by the centers’ CEO. Now there are indictments and allegations of $14 million in federal funds being diverted to private hands.
  • Breaking the Banks

    An investigation of community banks in Florida revealed that executives broke the law, looted their own institutions and got away with serious crimes that would have landed ordinary citizens in prison. The Herald-Tribune became the first American newspaper to obtain secret bank documents, built a database of 400,000 real estate records and profiled each of the 69 lenders that collapsed in the state. The series led to three indictments and prompted a pair of ongoing federal law enforcement investigations.
  • Corruption at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum

    From the Summer Olympics to papal visits to Super Bowls, the iconic peristyle of the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum long symbolized many of the city’s proudest hours. Now, because of the work of three Los Angeles Times reporters, the stately columns have become an emblem of one of the worst corruption scandals in recent Southern California history. The stories produced by Rong-Gong Lin II, Paul Pringle and Andrew Blankstein have led directly to the felony indictments of three public officials, the nation’s No. 1 promoter of rave concerts, another prominent music executive and a government contractor. A second misdemeanor case has been filed against two other Coliseum employees. The charges spelled out in the indictments mirror the reporters' findings – tales of bribery, embezzlement, kickbacks and conflict of interest. They allege that the taxpayers who own the Coliseum were bilked out of some $2 million and perhaps much more.
  • I-Team: Highway Robbery

    WCPO's investigative unit exposed widespread theft of traffic fines by court clerks in a local community notorious as a speed trap -- Arlington Heights, Ohio. Bigger than the thefts by a pair of court clerks was the government cover up that persisted for at least a decade. We obtained documents showing two successive police chiefs had warned the mayor and fiscal officer of Arlington Heights that a substantial amount of cash was missing as far back as 2002. Rather than heeding those warnings, the elected leaders of Arlington Heights marginalized both police chiefs, who eventually resigned. Our ongoing investigation has directly resulted in: · Multiple felony indictments against two government employees for theft in office. · Passage and subsequent repeal of an illegal ban on television cameras in public council meetings. · The complete and permanent shut-down of the speed trap on I-75 through Arlington Heights, Ohio. · A call from the county prosecutor for the village to be dissolved and annexed into a neighboring city. · Committee passage of Ohio House Bill 523, eliminating mayors' courts in communities with fewer than 1,000 residents. · The adoption of a new public records policy for the Village of Arlington Heights, conforming with Ohio public records and open meetings laws. Chief Investigative Reporter Brendan Keefe successfully fought against a wall of resistance to obtain public documents and gain access to illegally-closed council meetings.
  • Constable Corruption

    "Over a six month period, 13 Undercover reviewed thousands of documents to expose the entrenched constable system and the elected officials who single-handedly control the fate of thousands of deputies. At the time of the entry, three constables face possible indictments."