Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "infections" ...

  • Kaiser Health News: Nursing home investigations

    In a series of data-driven stories, Kaiser Health News revealed that tens of thousands of nursing home residents are dying because the facilities are woefully understaffed and painful infections are routinely left untreated or poorly cared for. In the most horrific cases, patients are cycling in out of hospitals with open wounds or bedsores that trigger sepsis or septic shock, a deadly bloodstream infection that is the leading killer in hospital ICUs.
  • Nursing home staffing-related investigations

    More than 1.3 million Americans spend their final months or years in a nursing home and many suffer from inattention, poor care, or outright neglect. But just how much they suffer – and why many die as a result – was hidden until now. In a series of data-driven stories, Kaiser Health News revealed that tens of thousands are dying because the facilities are woefully understaffed and painful infections are routinely left untreated or poorly cared for. In the most horrific cases, patients are cycling in out of hospitals with open wounds or bedsores that trigger sepsis or septic shock, a deadly bloodstream infection that is the leading killer in hospital ICUs.
  • The Uncounted

    Reuters found failures in tracking dangerous drug-resistant infections at every level, from the hospital bed to state health departments to the CDC in Atlanta.
  • Deadly Outbreaks, Dangerous Scopes

    The Los Angeles Times exposed how outbreaks of deadly superbug infections were caused by flaws in a medical device, and revealed that its maker failed to alert doctors about the risks to patients.
  • Nursing home inspections

    Inspections find peril in central Illinois nursing homes highlighted the continued risk of injuries, infections and medication errors residents of area-wide nursing homes face despite state reform. CU-CitizenAccess.org found dozens of problems cited in state inspection reports, compounded by steep fines and lawsuits. Further, CU-CitizenAccess.org found federal rating systems of nursing home care often misleading. In one case, a 71-year-old man died following medication errors and neglectful care.
  • Indian Drug Company Investigation

    The first part of our story profiled a whistleblower who exposed massive fraud at Ranbaxy, a multi-billion dollar Indian generic drug company that sold adulterated drugs to millions of Americans for years. The company sold these drugs to millions of Americans while lieing to the FDA claiming the drugs worked and could fight such life threatening illnesses like cancer, AIDS, diabetes and infections. The second part of our story revealed that despite the company’s claims, the company has ongoing serious manufacturing problems. In fact, just two weeks after CBS left a Ranbaxy plant in India, the FDA banned all finished drugs coming into the US from Ranbaxy. However, our story also revealed that while the FDA banned all finished drugs, the company is still continues to make the key ingredients for drugs sold to Americans today– including such popular drugs as Astra Zeneca’s Nexium. At the center of our story was the whistleblower, Dinesh Thakur, who had never done a television interview. The risks that Thakur took in exposing his company led to a massive federal false claims lawsuit that aided the federal criminal investigation and rewarded Thakur with $49 million. According to one federal agent who worked on the case for seven years, without Thakur “there would have been no investigation and no criminal conviction.” We were alarmed to find in our reporting that so many of the key players in the federal investigation had made personal decisions based on what they learned to never take a Ranbaxy drug. Three Justice Department attorneys, six former Ranbaxy employees, one former FDA criminal investigator and two Congressional investigators (Democrat and a Republican) all told CBS News that they would never take a Ranbaxy drug, nor would they allow a family member to do so. Each shared with us personal anecdotes of finding Ranbaxy drugs in family members’ medicine cabinets or receiving a prescription at a drug store only to tell the pharmacist that they must have a different brand. For this reason we felt strongly that it was important to notify our audience of the risks with this company. We also informed our audience that foreign drug makers are not subject to the same strong oversight that drug makers in the US face every day. For example, drug makers in the US face unannounced inspections. Despite efforts to beef up foreign FDA inspections, foreign companies are still notified in advance of upcoming inspections. In the US there is one FDA inspector for every 9 phamaceutical facilities. In India there is one FDA inspector for every 105 facilities. CBS News also tracked down half a dozen other former Ranbaxy employees who told CBS what they witnessed at the company both in the United States and in India. Two top employees went on camera to share their experiences.
  • Do No Harm

    For the first time, reporters published an analysis of Nevada's state hospital records and revealed nearly 1000 cases of preventable harm to patients over the past decade. There are also reports of widespread hospital-acquired infections and countless cases of accidental surgical injuries. The reporters show that hospitals have tried to keep this information hidden from the public.
  • Cure Unknown: Inside the Lyme Epidemic

    An investigation into "the science, history and brutal political war over Lyme disease and its co-infections." It exposes firsthand experience with the illness, while also exposing misconceptions about its unpredictability.
  • Culture of Resistance

    The Seattle Time analyzed millions of computerized hospital records, death certificate and other documents to track the swath of one of the nation's most widespread, and preventable, epidemics. In its investigation, the Times gained access to state files that revealed 672 previously undisclosed deaths attributable to the infection. The Times also found that in Seattle's largest public hospital, some patients who are infected with contagious MRSA are roomed with non-infected patients because of overcrowding. In at least a dozen cases, the Times proved that death certificates were inaccurate or incomplete when it came to MRSA.
  • Infectious State

    WISH-TV investigated how many people become worse or develop an infection while in hospitals in Indianapolis. "What happens when hospitals are left to police themselves?"