Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "influence" ...

  • Medicaid, Under the Influence

    Medicaid, Under the Influence: A joint investigation by the Center for Public Integrity and NPR showed how the pharmaceutical industry has infiltrated nearly every part of the often opaque process that determines how their drugs will be covered by taxpayers.
  • Title: The Desert Sun: An Empire in the Desert

    These stories reveal the stunning influence that a single farmer in California's Imperial Valley, Mike Abatti, has exerted over the region's Colorado River water and energy industry. Abatti has benefited from decisions made by his friends in elected office, a judge with ties to his family, and a district attorney whose second-in-command is his sister-in-law.
  • The Center for Public Integrity: How a Sanctioned Russian Bank Wooed Washington

    Foreign campaigns to influence American officials are supposed to be transparent under the Foreign Agents Registration Act, a law requiring detailed disclosure of foreign influence efforts. But few believe FARA — passed in 1938 to combat Nazi propaganda — has been working well. It is riddled with exemptions. Enforcement is weak. Criminal penalties apply only to willful violations. Lobbying by VTB, a Kremlin-owned Russian bank under sanctions, is a case study in the flaws of FARA. The bank’s hired lobbyists failed to disclose a series of meetings with government officials on behalf of the sanctioned bank until months after U.S. law required them to, and one firm did so only after being contacted by the Center for Public Integrity. The bank sponsored an exclusive gala and invited American officials who oversee sanctions through intermediaries, avoiding disclosure requirements.
  • The Center for Public Integrity and NPR: Medicaid, Under the Influence

    A joint investigation by the Center for Public Integrity and NPR produced a damning examination of one key reason why Medicaid costs are soaring: The pharmaceutical industry has infiltrated the systems that states use to control Medicaid drug costs.
  • ProPublica: Inside Trump’s VA

    ProPublica held Trump accountable for his promises to veterans by investigating the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. We exposed how Trump gave vast influence over the agency to three associates at his Mar-a-Lago resort who have no relevant expertise. We revealed his administration’s plans to expand the VA’s reliance on the private sector, a controversial agenda backed by the Koch brothers but opposed by most veterans. And we examined the VA’s record of using more private health care, finding that it resulted in higher costs for taxpayers and worse service for veterans.
  • The Daily Beast: Pay Dirt

    Pay Dirt is a weekly newsletter covering campaign finance, political influence, and corruption. These six stories, each of which led the newsletter for that day, covered a range of topics that shed light on the special interests trying to buy elections and influence American policymaking.
  • Influence & Injustice: An investigation into the power of prosecutors

    When it comes to racial bias in Florida's criminal justice system, there's plenty of blame to go around. Judges say prosecutors are the most responsible because they control the plea negotiation process where 95 percent of cases are resolved, But while prosecutors are the most powerful people in the system, that power varies based on where they practice and the relative influence of other actors – judges, public defenders, private attorneys, law enforcement officers and even juries.
  • How to Hack An Election

    The inside story of how a cybercriminal for hire teamed with Latin's America's most notorious fixer to influence presidential elections and subvert government power across the continent for a decade. Despite a wealth of cybersecurity reporting in recent years, the ability of computer hackers to disrupt the democratic foundation of elections had gone virtually unchronicled. This Bloomberg Businessweek article not only showed it could be done, it took the reader deep inside the operations with a hacker, who put himself in danger by speaking. The ground-breaking story stunned readers, journalists and officials in several countries. And it proved to be a roadmap to the disruption of the U.S. presidential election later in the year, with Russian agents accused of using digital tools to manipulate social media and to produce fake news that influenced public opinion.
  • Border Patrol

    We believe this is the most extensive investigation on the U.S. border conducted by a Sunday news program in 2016. We begin by revealing one of the biggest issues that’s gotten lost in the debate over illegal immigration: the disturbing increase in drug smuggling. In Border Control, we find evidence that our southern border is not under U.S. control. In Tunnel Vision, we expose some of the underground tunnels that cartels have used to smuggle drugs and people into the U.S. In Bordertown, USA, we provide an unusual profile of a U.S. border town so influenced by illegal smugglers and drugs, that the culture has worked its way into the fabric of daily life: Douglas, Arizona. In Crossing the Line, we take an eye opening look at the corruption inside U.S. Customs and Border Protection. And in Cuban Exodus, we exclusively reveal the “mind-boggling” number of Cubans surging across the Mexican border into the U.S.
  • How Cash Sent the Portland Housing Market Spinning

    Cash is king in red-hot Portland real estate, representing a full one-third of single-family home sales in 2014. Lee van der Voo’s seven-part series on the Portland housing market has uncovered in stark outline the often-obscured influence of cash from developers, foreign buyers and Wall Street in driving affordable housing from the city. Twenty-six investors who purchased more than 10 homes for cash in the listed market in Multnomah County through the recession. Average Black and Native American households priced out of the city. A publicly traded company that is renting out more than 200 Portland-area homes in a new twist on the asset-securitization that drove the Great Recession. The pension funds of teachers and police officers invested in cash-rich Wall Street landlords who compete on the housing market with the very middle-class professionals whose pensions they hold. With van der Voo’s reporting, an economic crisis that everyone in town talked about but no one could explain was given names, faces and numbers — and a hope of being fixed.