Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "interrogation" ...

  • Lasting Scars

    Prisoners waterboarded and tortured by the U.S. suffered enduring wounds — flashbacks, nightmares, depression, headaches — without ever being properly treated.
  • The homicide files

    A four-part series including: "At the Roundhouse: How detectives compel murder 'confessions,'" "How police harassed a family," "A police beating...and a decision not to charge detectives," "How detectives escape prosecution," and more.
  • Power Wars: Inside Obama's Post-9/11 Presidency

    Power Wars is a comprehensive investigative history of national security legal policymaking during the Obama presidency. Based on interviews with more than 150 officials and access to numerous internal documents, it takes readers behind the scenes to explain why the administration governed as it did on surveillance, drone strikes, Guantanamo, interrogations, military commissions, secrecy, leak investigations, war powers, and executive power. Bringing large amounts of new information to light about internal deliberations and never-before-reported memos and events, it equips readers to grapple with the recurring accusation that Obama has acted like Bush and to understand the legacy of both presidencies. http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0316286575
  • Journey to Jihad

    This is a nine-thousand-word investigation into the European jihadi pipeline. Using thousands of pages of leaked Belgian Federal Police records, which included wiretaps, electronic surveillance, seized radicalization pamphlets, and interrogation transcripts, it traces the web of connections between jihadi recruiters in Europe, and follows a reluctant ISIS member to Syria and back. It also reveals previously-unknown details on Amr al-Absi, the Syrian emir identified by the U.S. State Department as having been "in charge of kidnappings" for ISIS, as well war crimes committed against local civilians by his European recruits. I also took a portrait of the main subject, and a separate portrait of his father. Both pictures were published in the magazine. The article was my M.A. thesis project at Columbia Journalism School.
  • Spies versus Congress: A Constitutional Crisis over Torture

    McClatchy’s reporting first exposed and then detailed multiple efforts by the CIA and White House to thwart the Senate Intelligence Committee’s investigation into the agency’s use of torture, including CIA intrusions into the committee’s computers, in the most serious clash over congressional oversight of intelligence operations in decades. Other McClatchy reporting revealed the startling, top-secret conclusions of the committee's five-year, $40 million investigation eight months before the public release of the report's declassified executive summary.
  • Return to Benghazi

    In Return to Benghazi, Arwa Damon takes viewers back to the scene of a deadly embassy attack by unknown assailants. Damon's landmark reporting in this program led the U.S. to name the first suspect believed to be involved in the attack. On the night of September 11, 2012, four Americans including Ambassador Christopher Stevens were killed. It was a violent, well-coordinated attack that shocked the world. No one took responsibility for the killings. Libyan and U.S. officials did not know who to blame. A political firestorm erupted in the U.S. amongst lawmakers demanding to know what U.S. officials knew about the leadup to the attack. CNN's Arwa Damon arrived in Benghazi just days after the attack to cover the story. She spoke to witnesses and visited the compound where the Ambassador lived. It was there where she found Ambassador Stevens' diary. The FBI and the Libyan government vowed to find those responsible and bring them to justice, but justice did not come swiftly. It would be weeks before FBI teams would inspect the crime scene. Months passed and still no suspects were identified. Several months after the attack, Arwa Damon goes back to Benghazi to get an update on the investigation. She finds a changed city where westerners have fled and citizens face unexplained violence. Militias increasingly rule the streets and security forces struggle to keep control. Even more omonous, are the alarming signs of support for Al Qaeda that have emerged in less than a year. Damon tracks down the headquarters of Ansar Al Sharia, a group many Libyans and U.S. officials suspected might be behind the attack, but the group isn't talking. She also speaks to a Libyan rebel intelligence chief who blames a factions of Al Quada for the attack. The government is reluctant to move against either of them. In a rare interview, Arwa Damon sits down with a man U.S. officials have often suggested they would be interested in speaking to about the night of the attack: Ahmed Abu Khattala. He admits to Damon that he was at the compound that night while the attack was taking place. He also tells her no one from the FBI had tried to contact him, but that he would be willing to meet with them if it was a conversation and not an interrogation. After the program aired, an outraged U.S. Representative Jason Chaffetz told reporters, "News out today that CNN was able to go in and talk to one of the suspected terrorists, how come the military hasn't been able to get after them and capture or kill the people? How come the FBI isn't doing this and yet CNN is?" U.S. federal authorities then filed charges against against Khattala, suspecting him for being involved in the attack. Arwa Damon's reporting in Return to Benghazi not only showcased the powerful investigative journalism that CNN is known for, but it also sparked movement in the stalled investigation of the September 11, 2012 embassy attack.
  • Scenes of a Crime

    'Scenes of a Crime' explores a 10-hour interrogation culminating in a disputed confession, and an intense, high-profile murder trial in New York state. In September 2008, an infant named Matthew Thomas lies brain dead in a hospital, and his doctor misdiagnoses a skull fracture. The doctor tells Troy, New York police that the child has been murdered, and the detectives bring the baby’s father, Adrian Thomas, in for questioning. Police video of the interrogation reveals the complicated psychological contest between detectives and their suspect over many hours, including lies, threats and coercion that are legally permitted by most courts.
  • Anatomy of a Bad Confession

    The reporter investigates whether the Worcester Police Department coerced a confession and wrongfully failed to recognize the Miranda Rights of a sixteen-year-old girl.
  • Killings At The Canal: The Army Tapes

    War crime by American soldiers in Iraq is something that has never been seen before, until now. Four Iraqi detainees were killed and no one knew why, until the videotapes of the interrogations were found and everything was revealed. Also, the rules of the Army led the American soldiers to kill these detainees, as written in a memo.
  • The CIA and Interrogation

    "Not a formal series, these 12 stories explored the Bush administration's internal struggles over the extreme interrogation methods it embraced after 9/11 in the fact of widespread accusation that it had authorized torture."