Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "intoxicated" ...

  • Free to Flee

    In Florida, drunk drivers are routinely not arrested immediately after they cause a fatal crash, even when there’s sufficient probable cause to arrest them. In many cases, the drivers remain free as the investigations drag on for many months, well beyond accepted standards. Our investigation found that dozens of drunk drivers have escaped justice and hundreds more were left on the streets for years before being arrested and convicted, with some committing other crimes while they enjoyed their freedom.
  • Rough Rides

    Denver Sheriff’s deputies, running the 16th Street Mall drunk van, handcuff intoxicated riders then fail to seat belt them securely into the cage. The results: 38 injuries in five years including gashed foreheads, stitches, and broken limbs. In more than half the cases, “braking” was a contributing factor, which raises the possibility the deputies are intentionally hurting the drunks (as payback for cursing, spitting at them etc.)
  • Tragedy on the Water

    A 20-year-old Iowa man died on May 31, 2014, while in the custody of a Missouri Highway Patrol trooper on the Lake of the Ozarks. Brandon Ellingson, stopped for suspicion of boating while intoxicated, was being transported to a patrol zone office when he fell – or, as the patrol initially said, jumped – from the trooper’s boat. His wrists were locked in handcuffs behind his back, and the life vest the trooper had placed over his head soon came off. Ellingson struggled to keep his head above water for several minutes before slipping to the bottom of the lake. Subsequent reporting revealed a series of mistakes by the trooper, a road veteran who had not received proper training to work the water after the Missouri Water Patrol was merged into the Highway Patrol in 2011.
  • Breaking The Silence: Addressing Sexual Assault On Campus

    An investigation into how the University of Kansas pursued one rape case (http://huff.to/W8uLVy), where the assailant confessed, resulted in the harshest sanction being probation, specifically because the university wanted to avoid being "punitive." Meanwhile, the city police decline to investigate underage drinking at a fraternity where victim had become intoxicated, and the district attorney decides to close the case until HuffPost contacts him. The Breaking the Silence series uses a range of perspectives to explore the lenient and lackadaisical approach of colleges across America to sexual assaults committed on their campuses. The first piece included here is an investigation into how the University of Kansas handled one rape case in which the assailant confessed, and whose harshest sanction was probation — specifically because the university wanted to avoid being "punitive," citing a higher-ed trade group’s guidance. The city police declined to investigate underage drinking at the fraternity where the victim had become intoxicated, and the district attorney decided to close the case until HuffPost contacted him. Another, data-driven piece examines whether schools like the University of Kansas are anomalies. We concluded that most colleges opt not to remove sexual assault offenders from campus, with many citing the same higher-ed trade group's guidance to be "educative, not punitive" in their approach to punishing rape and sexual misconduct. Fewer than one-third of cases where a student is found responsible for sexual assault result in expulsion In our third piece, we found that even when a school does investigate and punish a student for sexual assault, it doesn't stop the student from transferring to another campus, sometimes without anyone at the new school knowing about his past misconduct.
  • License to Swill

    The Better Government Association and NBC 5 found that numerous Illinois police and fire labor contracts allow police officers and firefighters to arrive at work with a blood-alcohol level up to and including 0.079 – just below 0.08, at which drivers are legally considered intoxicated in Illinois. Turns out such contract language is, in many cases, decades-old and carried from one labor agreement to the next with little thought. The hazards of first responders being allowed to work “buzzed” is obvious: They deal with life-and-death decisions – whether in burning buildings or while pointing guns at suspects – that demand good decision-making and proper reaction times that alcohol can compromise. Our story came on the heels of the City of Chicago approving a $4.1 million settlement to the family of an unarmed man fatally shot by an on-duty Chicago cop who had been drinking alcohol prior to his shift.
  • "Dodging DWIs"

    The criminal justice system in St. Louis "has failed to punish drunken drivers." After multiple people were killed in drunk driving related accidents, reporters revealed that in St. Louis County, felony charges were not often issued to repeat offenders. Few people accused of a DWI actually have it placed on their record. Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has called for an examination of the broken system.
  • Collision Course

    The Times explores a broken legal system in Louisiana that allows DWI offenders to get off on minimal charges which ultimately resulted in the death of 15-year-old Adam Klingensmith at the wheel of a repeat DWI offender.
  • Judges Under the Influence

    The Charlotte Observer found that prominent defense lawyers in three coastal North Carolina counties helped judges get appointed and elected; and rarely lost when they took DWI cases to trial before them.
  • Falling Down on Drunk Driving

    This 10 part series revealed that while most states showed a significant improvement in drunk driving fatalities between 1982 and 2002, Missouri placed 30th. In Missouri, drunk drivers-even those who injure and kill- are usually punished with just probation and fines. Also, many offenders enter a plea in return of a 'Suspended Imposition of Sentence', which never becomes part of the public record.
  • Still Drunk, Still Driving

    Investigations by WITI - TV reveal that there are serious flaws in a system set up to deter repeat drunk drivers in Wisconsin. This investigation exposes how people who have multiple OWI's are able to drive drunk again. As WITI reports the courts and police have not been successful in keeping drunk drivers off the road.