Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "iran" ...

  • Pentagon secretly struck back against Iranian cyberspies targeting U.S. ships

    In the middle of June, tensions were rising between the United States and Iran. Iran had attacked oil tankers traveling through the Strait of Hormuz, and then downed an expensive, high-tech Navy RQ-4 Global Hawk surveillance drone flying over the Strait, upping the ante of the conflict. Given previous rhetoric from Trump administration officials including Secretary of State Mike Pompeo against the Iranian regime, the decision to exit the Iran deal or the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, and the increasingly heavy sanctions on Iran, the Yahoo News team was monitoring for chances to report in more depth on specific Iranian capabilities as well as U.S. plans to counter them. Following the attack on the U.S. drone, Yahoo News began communicating with sources who had extensive detail on a specific unit within the Iranian military in the cross-hairs of the U.S. military, a unit that had advanced its cyber capabilities to the point that it was able to track nearly all ships traveling through the Strait through both social engineering, or pretending to be attractive women engaging with service members traveling on the ships, to actually compromising ship GPS data websites in order to digitally monitor their paths. In the course of reporting, Yahoo News discovered a key, news breaking event—that just hours prior, the U.S. Cyber Command had launched a retaliatory strike aimed at limiting the capabilities of the specific Iranian cyber group the team had already been investigating. Yahoo was the first to break the news of the retaliatory strike, leading dozens of major news outlets to race to match the story. However, given the fact Yahoo News was investigating details into the cyber unit, our story was not only first but best and most detailed. The story demonstrates our ability to jump into the news cycle, provide key breaking news to our readers, as well as dig deep into illuminating new details. The story also revealed that Iranian capabilities to intercept and down drones to study them for espionage purposes was highly advanced, a fact previously unknown. Given President Trump’s recent decision to authorize a strike to kill IRGC Commander Qasem Suleimani, our reporting will continue to provide value to readers, analysts, and other interested parties hoping to better understand Iranian capabilities and how the U.S. might respond to them.
  • WAFB: No Apologies Necessary

    A look into the management of the Baton Rouge Police Department under it's current leadership.
  • #MeToo Unmasks the Open Secret of Sexual Abuse in Yoga

    A KQED callout for #MeToo accounts in the Bay Area yoga world and our ensuing nine-month investigation revealed a range of allegations by seven women against five teachers: from inappropriate massage to a violating touch in class, from drugging to sex with a minor. I found that the yoga community is struggling to rein in this sexual misconduct and abuse in its ranks. Some experts believe the lack of oversight of teachers and schools is adding to the problems of an industry experiencing explosive growth, where touch and trust are a fundamental part of the practice.
  • The Turn Toward Tehran

    How secret cash payments helped pave the way for a release of prisoners and new opening to Iran.
  • The Khadija Project

    When RFE/OCCRP reporter Khadija Ismayilova was arrested on politically motivated charges by Azerbaijani authorities in December of 2014, she asked her colleagues to continue her work exposing corruption in Azerbaijan. The Khadija Project was started by colleagues and friends of Ismayilova to do just that. https://www.occrp.org/freekhadijaismayilova/
  • The Biggest Bribe in Swedish History? TeliaSonera and Azerbaijan’s dictator

    As a result of Swedish Television's previous revelations, with suspected bribes in Uzbekistan, telecom TeliaSonera's new management said it would clean up the company's dirty past. But SVT, TT and the OCCRP this year revealed yet another suspect bribery affair - with a dictatorship – which the management had not reported to the police. It is by far the biggest alleged bribe in Sweden’s history, where the Swedish telecom giant is suspected of having enriched the Azerbaijani presidential family with up to 1 billion US dollars (depending on exchange rate) – for an asset taken from the Azeri people. [[https://www.occrp.org/corruptistan/azerbaijan/azerbaijan-telecom/offshores-close-to-president-paid-nothing-for-share-of-state-telecom.php#]] [[http://www.svt.se/ug/documents-reveal-telia-sonera-involved-in-suspected-large-scale-bribery]] [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nh3CayWd29M]] [[https://www.occrp.org/corruptistan/azerbaijan/azerbaijan-telecom/khadija-calls-latest-teliasonera-bribe-story-dangerous.php]] [[https://www.occrp.org/en/investigations/2531-teliasoneras-behind-the-scenes-connection-to-azerbaijani-presidents-daughters]] [[https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BxZjxumuFAv8Q1dWd2NSSnlFNGM/view]]
  • The Biggest Bribe in Swedish History? TeliaSonera and Azerbaijan’s dictator

    As a result of Swedish Television's previous revelations, with suspected bribes in Uzbekistan, telecom TeliaSonera's new management said it would clean up the company's dirty past. But SVT, TT and the OCCRP this year revealed yet another suspect bribery affair - with a dictatorship – which the management had not reported to the police. It is by far the biggest alleged bribe in Sweden’s history, where the Swedish telecom giant is suspected of having enriched the Azerbaijani presidential family with up to 1 billion US dollars (depending on exchange rate) – for an asset taken from the Azeri people. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nh3CayWd29M
  • The Russian Laundromat

    Call it the Laundromat. It’s a complex system for laundering more than $20 billion in Russian money stolen from the government by corrupt politicians or earned through organized crime activity. It was designed to not only move money from Russian shell companies into EU banks through Latvia, it had the added feature of getting corrupt or uncaring judges in Moldova to legitimize the funds. The state-of-the-art system provided exceptionally clean money backed by a court ruling at a fraction of the cost of regular laundering schemes. It made up for the low costs by laundering huge volumes. The system used just one bank in Latvia and one bank in Moldova but 19 banks in Russia, some of them controlled by rich and powerful figures including the cousin of Russian President Vladimir Putin.
  • Saric

    The book "Saric" follows the rise of the Balkan narco-cartel and details its drug smuggling, money laundering, and corruption of politicians and businesses. The year 2004 was a breakthrough for Balkan organized crime. After Serbian Prime Minister Zoran Đinđić was assassinated in 2003, police dismantled most of crime groups in the country. Big criminals understood that to keep operating they had to change and operate smarter. They did. They formed a syndicate, they stoped selling drugs inside the country and they moved into European markets. Through their new cartel they earned billions and have used it to buy political parties, police and control over the economies of Serbia, Montenegro and other countries.
  • Bloomberg Businessweek’s 2014 Cyber Attack Reporting

    Over the past decade, hackers have stolen trade secrets, millions of personal identities, and wrought havoc on some of the world’s biggest companies. Some of these actions were orchestrated by lone criminals; some by governments. All of them share one thing in common: The details are never revealed. That changed in 2014 when Bloomberg Businessweek published a trio of deeply reported stories by Michael Riley and Bloomberg colleagues about digital attacks. Each vividly takes readers into the secretive world of hackers and exposes corporate America’s vulnerabilities in startling detail. “The Epic Hack: Target ignored its own alarms – and turned its customers into victims," "How Russian Hackers Stole the NASDAQ” and “Now at the Sands: Iranian Hackers in Every Server” exemplify superlative investigative reporting in a complex field alongside masterful storytelling.