Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

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  • Hard Rock Hotel Collapse

    When an 18-story hotel under construction collapsed catastrophically on a Saturday morning in October, we immediately began trying to understand what went wrong. Initially, this involved sharing video of the collapse with experts to seek opinions about possible causes. In the days and weeks that followed, we spoke with workers who were on the job and reviewed building plans and inspection reports to determine where missteps were made. We also uncovered a video, narrated in Spanish by a worker on the site, that was posted several days before the collapse, in which the worker spotlights a number of alarming flaws in the building.
  • Drilling Down: Big Oil’s Bidding

    When the government awards energy companies the rights to drill for offshore oil and gas, it’s supposed to make sure the American public, which owns the resources, doesn’t get screwed. The government is required by law to use “competitive bidding” and to ensure that taxpayers receive “fair market value.” However, decades of data suggest that the government has been falling down on the job, a Project On Government Oversight analysis found. Among POGO’s discoveries: Instead of taking the trouble to estimate the value of individual offshore tracts, the government has simply labeled many of them worthless and has awarded drilling rights on that basis. Energy companies have invested billions of dollars in tracts the Interior Department categorized as “non-viable”—in other words, worthless. Over the past 20 years, more than two-thirds of the leases that ultimately became energy-producing had been deemed worthless by the Interior Department.
  • Asbury Park Press: Protecting the Shield

    Killed. Beaten. Stalked. More than 200 citizens across New Jersey have been victimized in recent years by out-of-control rogue cops. In many cases, the cops kept their jobs, even got promoted – while tens of millions of your tax dollars kept the abuses quiet. Until now.
  • The New Food Economy and The Intercept: Amazon employees and the safety net

    As food stamps go online in the coming years, Amazon is poised to collect a large proportion of sales from the $70-billion program. Yet our investigation found that in at least five states, the company's own employees are disproportionately reliant on the program to feed their families. We framed these findings in contrast to the vast subsidies states and local governments provide the company in exchange for "good" jobs. Months before the conclusion of Amazon’s HQ2 search prompted mainstream outlets to wonder whether or not the company’s presence really benefits the communities that compete to host its operations, our reporting revealed that taxpayers subsidize Amazon's expansion every step of the way. It remains to be seen whether or not those investments pay off.
  • ProPublica: Trump Town

    Trump Town is a searchable database of 2,816 current and former Trump administration political appointees, including their jobs and offices, employment history, lobbying records, government ethics documents, financial disclosures and, in some cases, resumes. We made the data available and easy to use so journalists and researchers can use it in their own work. Prior to this news application, much of this data was either not accessible to the public or not searchable.
  • NBC2: Unfinished Business

    It’s by far the biggest complaint that comes to the NBC2 Investigators: Contractors accused of taking money, but not finishing the job. That’s why NBC2 Investigators Rachel Polansky and David Hodges decided to go in-depth with complaints of unfinished business — questioning the system that’s supposed to be holding contractors accountable.
  • Locked Out: Florida sentences are for life

    A group of University of Florida journalists investigated barriers felons face when released from prison in the Sunshine State. For four months, they followed the lives of seven felons, some just minutes after they were released. In a digital-first, Netflix-style episodic investigation, these student journalists explored how the label “felon” follows 1.6 million Floridians long after their sentences end. The student journalists looked into the three major issues Florida felons face: finding a place to live, securing a stable job and earning back their right to vote.
  • Daily Herald: Illinois tollway series

    The Illinois tollway, governed by a nonelected board of political appointees, is the only option to get around the Chicago region for millions of drivers who spend $1.3 billion annually to use the system. While hardworking customers paid tolls, tollway executives and board directors were quietly hiring political insiders for high-paying jobs, handing lucrative contracts to firms where their relatives worked, and weakening bylaws to water down the tollway board’s conflict-of-interest rules. As the Daily Herald exposed nepotism, patronage and excessive spending at the tollway, the agency’s leaders fought back. Tactics included denying FOIAs, concealing information and accusing the newspaper of harassment. The Daily Herald’s investigation caught the attention of other media, two governors and state lawmakers who ultimately fired the tollway board of directors in early 2019. Legislators credited the Herald’s investigative series with alerting the public about what Gov. J.B. Pritzker referred to “unethical behavior.”
  • CBC Radio: #MeToo in Medicine

    The #MeToo in Medicine breaks the code of silence in healthcare to expose the hierarchical culture of medicine which allows for those in senior positions to sexually harass and abuse their junior colleagues. The story profiles two physicians who speak out for the first time about how they were sexually harassed on the job by their superiors.
  • CareerSource Tampa Bay

    The Tampa Bay Times first raised questions about the accuracy of job placement figures that CareerSource Pinellas and CareerSource Tampa Bay reported to the state of Florida and later showed how both jobs centers took credit for thousands of hires they had nothing to do with, entered fake phone numbers into a reporting system and issued bonuses to recruiters based on those inflated figures.