Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "jurors" ...

  • The Baton Rouge Advocate: "Tilting the Scales"

    A Jim Crow law, still on the books in Louisiana, allows for criminal convictions with only 10 of 12 jurors agreeing -- a practice that our analysis shows continues to discriminate against black defendants.
  • L.A. Times: How California Law Shielded Dishonest Cops

    For decades, California’s strict police privacy laws made it nearly impossible for anyone to find out basic information about police officer misconduct. A team of Los Angeles Times reporters spent months investigating the impact of this secrecy on the criminal justice system. They found that officers caught for dishonesty and other serious wrongdoing were able to continue testifying in court without prosecutors, defendants, judges and jurors ever finding out about their past. Countless defendants were convicted based on the testimony of these officers. Published at the height of a political debate over making police records public, the stories helped galvanize support to change state law and open up some records about officer misconduct, which had been kept confidential for 40 years.
  • Over the Line: The Atlanta Journal-Constitution and WSB-TV investigation of Georgia's police shootings

    The most comprehensive examination of fatal police shootings in Georgia history uncovered prosecutorial misconduct, police cover-ups and breakdowns in justice that prompted state leaders to take action. The year-long investigation identified 184 fatal shootings in Georgia since 2010, details of each case and its outcome in the courts. The series distinguishes itself by the scope of the data-driven reporting and the ability of reporters to encourage reluctant police officers, prosecutors and grand jurors to go on the record and break the code of silence that has kept questionable police shootings hidden from the public. http://bcove.me/tv4wuzmd http://investigations.myajc.com/overtheline/database/ https://vimeo.com/150303553
  • "Final Justice

    For seven years, the WEWS-TV Investigative Unit researched and reported the case of a Cleveland man, Darrell Houston, who was serving "33 years to life" in prison. By uncovering new witnesses and interviewing past jurors, the investigation by WEWS eventually led to a new trial, the release of Houston and the exoneration of his "murder and robbery charges."
  • Small Town Justice

    Jean Claude Meus was convicted of vehicular homicide and sentenced to 15 years in prison. The Florida Highway Patrol put together evidence showing Meus fell asleep at the wheel, lost control of his semi truck and overturned on minivan, killing a mother and daughter. The investigative team interviewed the first witness on the scene of the accident, who said Meus was alert and helpful immediately after the crash. Using evidence obtained from measurements, photos, etc., the asked an outside expert to map the scene and reconstruct the crash. The conclusion? Meus was awake and intentionally steered his truck off the roadway. The story fit with what Meus said, that he had swerved to avoid an oncoming car and lost control before overturning onto the van. When two jurors on the case agreed to meet with the new team and look at the new evidence, they concluded they would not have been able to convict Meus if this information had been presented at trial.
  • Final Justice

    For five years, the investigative team from WEWS reviewed trial testimonies, interviewed witnesses and jurors and uncovered police records obtained through the Ohio Open Records Act in order to prove that Darrell Houston, serving time in prison for murder, was innocent. Their two part report found sufficient evidence for a new trial.
  • On Hold

    On Oct. 22, 2007 there was a mistrial for the federal case of five men who worked for the Muslim charity, the Holy Land Foundation, because they were believed to be funding the Palestinian terrorist organization, the Hamas. After four monts of trial, the jury came to a verdict on Oct. 18 but the judge let the jury go home for the weekend before reading the verdict on Oct. 22. Three jurors decided they didn't agree with the verdict, adding to the case ending in a mistrial.
  • Firefighter's Explosion

    The Star reinvestigated "the case of five Kansas Citians convicted in 1997 of setting arson fires ten years earlier that sparked an explosion killing six Kansas City firefighters." The Star found that many of the witnesses who testified stood to gain from their claims and that the jurors misunderstood their instructions.
  • Every Contact Leaves a Trace

    "This book is an oral history that focuses on the realities of crime scene investigation, based on extensive interviews with eighty forensic experts throughout the U.S. The major finding was that the depictions of crime scene investigation in TV shows such as 'CSI' and its many off-shoots have created a set of expectations, on the part of the publi, jurors, and police, that has had the unintended effect of compromising both timely crime scene analysis and fair jury trials."
  • Small Town Justice

    A Haitian truck driver, Jean Claude Meus, was convicted of vehicular homicide after a semi he was driving turned over and fell on a minivan, killing a mother and daughter. While no drugs or alcohol were present in his system at the time of the accident, prosecutors were able to push a conviction based on their assertion that he had fallen asleep at the wheel, and was thus driving recklessly. But WTVT-TV investigators "found convincing evidence that (he) did not fall asleep, and in fact, was trying to avoid an accident." An off-duty firefighter was a witness at the scene, and asserted that Meus was "alert and helpful immediately after the crash." Yet the lead investigator, who attended high school with victim Nona Moore, never interview Juan Otero, the off-duty firefighter. With the help of experts, WTVT reconstructed the crash, and the conclusion drawn was that Meus had turned off the road to avoid an obstruction. Further, WTVT spoke with jurors who said that with that new evidence, they would not have voted to convict.