Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "kidnapping" ...

  • University of Utah Student Killed; Who Is Murder Suspect Ayoola Ajayi?

    Twelve days after the disappearance of University of Utah student, Mackenzie Lueck this summer, and following an exhaustive investigation by law enforcement, police arrested and formally charged the suspect in her death, Ayoola Adisa Ajayi. Ajayi faces four charges in connection to Lueck’s violent murder, including aggravated murder and aggravated kidnapping. KSL Investigators knew Ajayi was the person of interest in this case because he owned the small property in Salt Lake where multiple search warrants were executed in the case prior to his arrest. Before authorities released his name to the public, KSL Investigators worked to learn everything they could about the 31-year-old immigrant, originally from Africa, so we could break the investigation as soon as the suspect’s name was released. Although much of a person’s immigration status is private information, representatives with the Salt Lake County District Attorney’s Office confirmed Ajayi is a lawful legal resident and he was at the time of his arrest. However, the KSL Investigators exposed how he came to this country and revealed possible oversight by Utah State University and the federal government when he dropped out of school a number of times and was posting online about seeking to find a wife to keep his citizenship status.
  • Mexico's Crackdown on Central American Migrants

    In January and February 2015, In These Times reporter Joseph Sorrentino interviewed dozens of Central American migrants along one of Mexico's main migration routes. He found that a Mexican government initiative to more aggressively police and deport migrants had forced them to take slower and more dangerous routes, leaving them easier prey to robbery, rape, extortion, kidnapping, assault and murder by gangs and narcos. Mexico's stepped-up border enforcement was the result of U.S. pressure on Mexico to halt the "surge" of Central American children reaching the U.S. border.
  • The Outlaw Ocean

    Lawlessness reigns on the high seas, with kidnapping, indenturing and even killing among a largely invisible global work force, and environmental crimes rampant as porous laws, questions about jurisdiction and lack of enforcement have failed to stem abuses. http://graphics8.nytimes.com/video/players/offsite/index.html?videoId=100000003630578 http://www.nytimes.com/video/world/100000003697113/five-men-killed-at-sea.html http://www.nytimes.com/video/world/asia/100000003660720/drugged-kidnapped-and-enslaved.html http://graphics8.nytimes.com/video/players/offsite/index.html?videoId=100000003675414 http://graphics8.nytimes.com/video/players/offsite/index.html?videoId=100000003675416
  • Journey to Jihad

    This is a nine-thousand-word investigation into the European jihadi pipeline. Using thousands of pages of leaked Belgian Federal Police records, which included wiretaps, electronic surveillance, seized radicalization pamphlets, and interrogation transcripts, it traces the web of connections between jihadi recruiters in Europe, and follows a reluctant ISIS member to Syria and back. It also reveals previously-unknown details on Amr al-Absi, the Syrian emir identified by the U.S. State Department as having been "in charge of kidnappings" for ISIS, as well war crimes committed against local civilians by his European recruits. I also took a portrait of the main subject, and a separate portrait of his father. Both pictures were published in the magazine. The article was my M.A. thesis project at Columbia Journalism School.
  • Hunting Boko Haram

    FRONTLINE investigates Nigeria's efforts to "Bring Back Our Girls" and fight Boko Haram.
  • Taken: The Coldest Case Ever Solved

    CNN looked into the 1957 kidnapping and murder of Maria Ridulph, which went unsolved for half a century. The five-part series found that the suspect was interviewed and discounted during the early days of the investigation, as the FBI took over the case. His parents helped him establish an alibi, and his mother supposedly exposed his secret on her death bed. A sister launched the investigation that resulted in the arrest and conviction of Jack McCullough, who maintains his innocence to this day. McCullough was convicted after a four-day trial on what appeared to be thin evidence resulting from questionable legal rulings by an inexperienced judge. The most compelling evidence is the testimony of the eyewitness, who was 8 years old at the time and is now in her 60s. She says she is certain, and she appears to be a credible witness.
  • Collection of stories: College student's murder reveals broken parole system

    The kidnapping and brutal slaying of a college student in Little Rock led to the discovery that the suspect, an eight-time parole violator, had been released from jail just hours before the murder. That story and subsequent follow-ups and investigative pieces led to the abrupt retirement of the parole system's leader; three separate investigations, including one conducted by the Arkansas State Police; a series of legislative hearings; and numerous policy reforms.
  • Ruthless Kidnapping Rings Reach from Desert Sands to U.S. Cities

    The story deals with the ever-evolving crime of human smuggling, and how opportunistic criminal gangs exploit gaps in law enforcement to open new channels for profit. In this case it was how Bedouin gangs along the Egypt-Israel border in Egypt’s Sinai Peninsula took advantage of the Arab Spring, the fall of the Mubarak regime, and the increasingly lawless state of the region to create a perfect smuggling scenario linking African refugees in Israel to Palestinian bag men (who collect the ransom) to diaspora Africans in Europe and North America who raise thousands of dollars to rescue their captives. The story documents the $80,000 payment made by one immigrant father from Eritrea—now living near San Jose, California—to secure the release of his teen-age daughter and his own brother. We showed how this was part of a growing international network that has funneled millions of dollars in each of the last 3 years to the criminals operating these enterprises.
  • The Pearl Project

    The Pearl Project spent more than three years invesigating the 2002 kidnapping and murder of Wall Street Journal reporter David Pearl. The investigation found that hte kidnapping and murder was a multifaceted, at times chaotic conspiracy.
  • Kidnapping in Phoneix: Uncovering the Truth

    In 2008, Phoneix Police reported some startling statistics. 358 kidnappings had been recorded in 2008 alone. KNXV-TV's investigation uncovered that the statistics used were inaccurate.