Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "killing" ...

  • Student threatened professor more than a year before killing him

    This USC Annenberg Media special investigation uncovered that despite receiving a written warning that a student intended to kill his professor, USC administrators allowed him back on campus to work with the man he threatened and would go on to stab to death on campus. This story revealed that USC did not have a system in place to adequately track threats to campus safety and make sure students with serious mental illness were well enough to be in school.
  • Deadly Force

    Deadly Force documented a pattern of harm and harassment by deputies at rural sheriff’s department in North Carolina. Two residents had been killed; others were beaten or threatened.
  • Doubled Up In Solitary Confinement

    This seems like a contradiction. Put a prison inmate into a solitary confinement cell and then give him a cellmate. It’s called “double-cell solitary confinement”: Two inmates considered so dangerous and violent that they’re removed from the general prison population but then put together in one tiny cell, together for 23 to 24 hours a day. NPR’s Investigations Unit exposed this little-known practice that is common in federal and state prisons. The series showed how double-cell solitary confinement results in high levels of prison violence and sharply increases the likelihood of inmates killing other inmates.
  • Rhino Horn Trafficking

    Poaching rhino for horn has decimated the species, corrupted law enforcement from rangers to prosecutors, judges, and politicians, and resulted in the killing of rangers and poachers throughout the rhinos’ range. Unlike elephants whose ivory tusks do not grow back, rhino horn can be sawed off and it will regrow, opening an opportunity to farm the species. This story investigates the highly controversial effort by the South African game industry to farm rhino as a proposed solution to the international trafficking problem. In particular, two South Africans who hold the key to the rhino’s future, have used lawsuits and, in one case, a shell plaintiff to block major criminal actions in South Africa and the United States, as well as to force the lifting of South Africa’s ban on rhino horn trade.
  • Failure to Protect series

    In a four-day series, The Daily Sentinel examined the killings of three children who were known to the local child-welfare system, as part of a broader examination of the child welfare and foster care systems in the county. The purpose was to inform the public about how the children ended up living with the people who ultimately killed them or were accused of killing them, the warning signs, the fallout that resulted from the deaths, and identify possible changes to the system that could prevent future killings.
  • How Fire Feeds

    Last summer, three sparks set off a series of violent firestorms in southern Lake County, California, destroying thousands of homes and killing four people. Reveal took a deeper look at the fires using satellite images and government data to explore how and why the blazes moved through the county and what it means for the future of firefighting in the West. Here is a link to the interactive Reveal created with satellite data to show how the fires spread: http://fire.revealnews.org/
  • Lax building inspections, lurking danger

    When a building collapsed in Center City Philadelphia, killing six people and injuring 13, attention quickly focused on the reckless demolition contractor who cut corners in taking down the building. Then it shifted to the city agency charged with overseeing demolitions and ensuring safety. Chagrined city officials pledged safety reforms and stepped up enforcement. An Inquirer investigation revealed just how empty those promises were and documented dangerous conditions in buildings across the city.
  • Mexican Mafia Killer and the LAPD

    This series started off with a tip: Los Angeles police were bringing a high-profile criminal to a private business event in downtown L.A. That criminal turned out to be Rene "Boxer" Enriquez, a former shot-caller for the Mexican Mafia sentenced to life in prison for two killings. That the LAPD would use public resources to bring him to a private event was only the first surprise — we soon learned Enriquez had a cozy relationship with law enforcement officials and was set to be paroled. We spent weeks digging into his background, contacting the children of one of his victims, interviewing people who knew him, reading court records and transcripts outlining his crimes. The reporting by The Times ultimately prompted two investigations by the LAPD, including one into a high-profile deputy chief. The governor also decided to deny Enriquez parole and keep him behind bars.
  • Unreasonable Doubt: Did Kelly Siegler Really Railroad an Innocent Man Eight Years Ago?

    The story investigates the troubling findings of a judge who recommended that a man convicted in 2007 of killing his pregnant wife receive a new trial.
  • Distress Signal

    A few months after a helicopter caught fire and crashed off the coast of Virginia in January 2014, killing 3 and wounding 2, the U.S. Navy announced that it had fixed the mechanical defect it in all of its MH-53E Sea Dragons. Our investigative reporting not only revealed that to be untrue, it had an immediate impact: It prompted top brass to ground an entire fleet of more than 170 helicopters for most of 2015.