Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "labor" ...

  • Documentary Window (The Moles)

    During Japanese colonial rule (1910-1945), Korean independence activists established the Provisional Government of the Republic of Korea. This year marks the 100th anniversary of the Provisional Government. Even to this day, Korea and Japan are in constant conflict over unresolved historical issues, most notably the comfort women. Hence, the pro-Japanese issues remain an important agenda for the Korean government. Although various research has been conducted on these pro-Japanese groups, there is a dearth of studies on Korean spies who hid their identity and collaborated with the Japanese, with very few academic papers on the subject. The KBS documentary seeks to illuminate the true nature of the Korean spies who had infiltrated the independence movement camp and sold out their own people to the Japanese.
  • Tainted Water

    Canadians have every reason to believe that the water that runs from their taps is beyond reproach: abundant, clean and safe. But the “Tainted Water” investigation, an unprecedented national collaboration of universities and news organizations, exposed the risks faced by millions of Canadians whose drinking water contains elevated levels of lead, a powerful, insidious neurotoxin, and other contaminants. Coordinated by the staff at the Institute for Investigative Journalism (IIJ), “Tainted Water” is the largest project of its kind in Canadian history, and possibly the largest student-led project worldwide. The consortium brought together more than 120 journalists, student journalists and faculty members from nine post-secondary institutions and six news organizations and their bureaus over a period of 18 months to report the series. Journalism students and reporters combined their findings and produced local, regional and national investigative features, released as a series of print, digital and TV stories, making international headlines.
  • Superpower: One Man's Quest to Transform American Energy

    The book, Superpower, uncovered and reported for the first time ways that Tennessee politicians and Tennessee Valley Authority officials were working clandestinely to stop a major renewable energy project. Through interviews and documents, many obtained through FOIA requests, the book showed how incumbent utilities and their political allies could collaborate to slow the growth of renewable energy in order to preserve political power.
  • Silicon Valley’s Hidden Figures

    Silicon Valley has a big diversity problem. But no one has been able to comprehensively quantify it until now. Some of the multibillion-dollar companies that fuel the global economy have sought to hide how few women and people of color they have in their organizations, refusing to release the data, claiming the information is a trade secret. We built the largest and most comprehensive database of diversity employment data for Silicon Valley available. Through a groundbreaking collaboration with a University of Massachusetts Amherst sociologist, we got Equal Employment Opportunity Council (EEOC) data for 177 of the largest tech companies through public records requests and a successful FOIA lawsuit. Through this data, we uncovered disparities and ranked companies based on their diversity scores. By establishing a baseline of comparative data, we were able to hold companies accountable for their diversity hiring practices for the first time. Because of our analysis, the public now knows some of the worst companies when it comes to diversity in Silicon Valley. But we also found that diversity is not an impossible goal to achieve for technology companies: some are doing much better than their peers.
  • Driven Into Debt

    This ongoing series of stories — which started at ProPublica Illinois and later was produced in collaboration with WBEZ — exposed how the city of Chicago’s aggressive and unequal ticketing practices, combined with punitive collections measures, have pushed tens of thousands of mostly black motorists into Chapter 13 bankruptcy. The stories have also examined Chicago’s cottage industry of bankruptcy attorneys who profit off consumers with ticket debt, even as their clients often sink even deeper into debt; the racially disparate consequences of license suspensions for unpaid tickets; and an ill-fated decision to hike the price of what was already one of the most expensive tickets in the city.
  • ’Drag this out’: Atlanta mayor’s office directs delay of public requests

    In a unique partnership, WSB-TV joined resources with investigative journalists at The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Reporters, producers and editors crafted stories for the needs of their audiences and platforms but broke them in tandem. Management from both media outlets collaborated to make a formal complaint with the state after reporting on city officials frustrating Georgia’s Open Records Act. WSB-TV and The Atlanta Journal-Constitution are both owned by parent company Cox Media Group
  • WTSP-TV/Tampa Bay Times: Zombie Campaigns

    More than 100 former federal politicians kept spending their campaign money long after leaving office, a multiplatform collaboration between the Tampa Bay Times and WTSP-TV revealed. In some cases, the campaigns kept spending even though the politician was dead.
  • The Weather Channel Digital: Exodus: The Climate Migration Crisis

    Exodus: The Climate Migration Crisis looks at a complicated problem that is of staggering importance, putting human faces on a truly global issue. The Weather Channel Digital and its partners told stories of climate migration as documentaries, photo essays and in-depth articles, and also asked individuals to weigh in with their personal experiences and professional analysis. The result is a rich, subtle and, frankly, upsetting look at a moment when humanity is frustratingly unprepared for the changes it's already wrought in the world.
  • The Weather Channel Digital and Telemundo with Efran Films: Hidden Cost

    In “Hidden Cost,” The Weather Channel and Telemundo with Efran Films conduct an immersive investigation of the lives of America’s migrant farmworkers, exploring in particular the impact of climate change on the children who toil in our country’s fields.
  • Tangled up in debt

    In late 2017, The Hechinger Report began a deep dive into cosmetology education in Iowa, an education marketplace that has long eluded scrutiny and whose graduates comprise a poorly paid and “invisible” workforce. For-profit beauty schools have maintained a near-monopoly on the sector and kept state regulations to their liking, and where, despite the schools’ hefty price tags, student earnings years after graduation often remain low. The story was a collaboration with The New York Times.