Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "latinos" ...

  • Undrinkable

    Imagine if you turned on the tap and the water that poured out was undrinkable. That's the reality facing an estimated 100,000 Texans — many of them impoverished Latinos living along the Mexican border. The Texas Tribune exposed this public health crisis in a five-part series in March — a crucial reporting project that revealed the malfeasance, red tape, environmental woes, political infighting and cultural barriers that stood in the way of getting clean, safe water to the neediest parts of the state.
  • Losing Ground

    By some of the most important measures of social progress, the largest minority populations in Colorado, Latinos and blacks, are falling further behind their white counterparts. In an analysis of six decades of data pertaining to family income, home ownership, poverty, high school and college graduation, as well as comparative health and justice figures, I-News determined that Colorado was a more equitable state than most during the era of the Civil Rights Movement, but is less so now. These findings do not bode well for a state in which minorities are the fastest rising population, and, within two decades, likely the majority of the work force.
  • Fair Housing in America

    ProPublica reporter Nikole Hannah-Jones looked at how and why the Dept. of Housing & Urban Development has failed to enforce the Fair Housing Act. She traced the nation’s history of housing discrimination, from the Great Migration of African Americans to Northern cities in the early 1900’s to the post-World War II boom and into the 1960’s. Again and again, her reporting showed, federal agencies played a pivotal role in keeping white and black Americans separate. While the law required localities to “affirmatively further’’ fair housing, neither Democratic nor Republican presidents had the political will to enforce it. Over time, courts interpreted that provision to mean that HUD could withhold billions of dollars in grants from communities that were not doing everything possible to end segregation. Yet officials charged with enforcing the fair housing law told Hannah-Jones they were often ignored or undercut by others inside HUD, who saw the agency’s main mission as distributing development dollars. Even when courts issued rulings insisting that communities honor the law’s intentions, as she notes in a case about Westchester County, New York, they were routinely ignored by HUD officials and local politicians alike. Hannah-Jones also looked at how little HUD does to root out or punish racial steering and overt discrimination in the sale and rental of property. Millions of Latinos and African Americans face such bias each year. Yet HUD hardly ever does the sort of undercover testing proven to catch landlords and real estate agents in the act.
  • Alleged Illegal Searches & Unlawful Marijuana Arrests by NYPD

    The story takes a look into the NYPD's "stop and frisk" policy. The "stop and frisks" are street encounters carried out almost exclusively blacks and Latinos in the city's poorest neighborhoods. The investigation shows that NYPD is likely making false arrests for marijuana possession after recovering marijuana through illegal searches during "stop and frisks."
  • San Jose police: Misdemeanor Justice

    The San Jose police are the most aggressive city in California when it comes to misdemeanor crimes and the arrests. They have the largest per capita of arrests in the state and many of these arrests are for petty crimes or resisting arrest where no crime was actually involved. Many of these crimes involve the attitude of those being arrested, public intoxication without proper tests, and disturbing the peace. A number of these arrests are based on color and a great deal of force was used in these arrests.
  • American Divide; The Immigration Crackdown

    The crackdown on immigrants living here illegally has spread to nearly every corner of the United States. States, counties and private citizens have taken matters into their own hands. Get-tough laws, however, have created unintended consequences for U.S. citizens, employers and foreigners
  • Missed Signals; Killed by the Cops

    This project, a collaboration between the Chicago Reporter and ColorLines, analyzed fatal police shootings among America's ten largest cities. The investigation found that African Americans were overrepresented among police shooting victims, and Latinos are also frequent victims.
  • Citizenship For Sale

    Reporters from WTVJ-TV went undercover to witness a Florida man, Audie Watson, in the process of selling memberships in the Little Shell Band of the Pembina Nation. Watson claims the documents he sells for $1,500 allow purchasers to enter the United States legally. Reporters confronted Watson, and he agreed to be interviewed on camera. The series also showed interviews with people who had been arrested trying to cross the border with documents sold by Watson. Although Watson is now being investigated by state and federal officials and is currently on probation in Florida for an unrelated pyramid scheme conviction, his operation has not been shut down as of January 2007.
  • Inside the UFW

    This series takes a look at what the United Farm Workers have become since it was founded over 40 years ago by Cesar Chavez and others. They found that the UFW is not a union in the typical sense; it has not really been able to raise wages for workers or improve working conditions. It has become, instead, a collection of social-service organizations, some of them for profit, some non-profit, for farm workers. Family members of the UFW founders have often inherited leadership roles and sometimes the money which is donated to various social service organizations is not well accounted for.
  • Political Questions - James J. Chavez

    This report asked a lot of questions about James J. Chavez, a local politician who ran for a seat on the board of the Maricopa County Special Health Care District. The investigators found that Chavez lived outside of the district, that the address he provided inside the district was fake, and that both his college degree and MBA were not valid. Furthermore, the investigation found that he mismanaged funds in a non-profit organization that he worked for.