Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "lawyers" ...

  • The Texas Observer and Grist with The Investigative Fund: Too Big to Fine, Too Small to Fight Back

    Citgo refineries spew thousands of tons of chemicals into the air, degrading air quality and putting human health at risk. Despite Citgo's revenues hitting north of $40 billion, the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality lets the company off easy. For her investigation in The Texas Observer, in partnership with Grist and The Investigative Fund, Naveena Sadasivam dug into how the TCEQ has fined corporate polluters $30 million for air violations, not much more than the $24 million imposed on gas stations, a significant percentage of which are owned by immigrants, just for record-keeping errors. The disparity between TCEQ's treatment of mom-and-pop operations versus large corporations favors those with money and power. The agency rarely punishes big polluters, often because of a legal loophole, and when it does levy a fine, lawyers negotiate big reductions in penalties. As a result, environmental advocates and small business owners say there's a fundamental unfairness at work with the way TCEQ treats the businesses it regulates.
  • The Marshall Project: Exploiting the Exonerated

    Two mentally disabled brothers spent 30 years in prison before DNA exonerated them of the rape and murder of an 11 year old girl. Once free, the very people supposed to help and protect them - their sister, lawyers and self-described advocates - preyed on them and ripped off hundreds of thousands of dollars.
  • CBS THIS MORNING: The Prison Release of David Robinson

    DAVID ROBINSON WALKED OUT OF A MISSOURI PRISON IN MAY, 2018 INTO THE WAITING ARMS OF HIS MOTHER AFTER SPENDING NEARLY TWO DECADES BEHIND BARS FOR A CRIME HE DID NOT COMMIT. WHILE THE OCCASION WAS CAUSE FOR CELEBRATION, OUR COVERAGE WAS DESIGNED TO INFORM AUDIENCES OF THE HIGHLY UNUSUAL PATH ROBINSON’S LAWYERS TOOK TO PROVE HIS INNOCENCE. OUR COVERAGE WAS ALSO CREDITED WITH THE NEEDED ADDED IMPETUS TO LEAD TO A TIMELY RELEASE.
  • Did Texas Prison Guards Drive Marinda Griggs to Kill Herself?

    This is a story focusing on criminal justice, and attempts by defense lawyers to better devise protections for the most vulnerable. And they believe that because of changing law – namely the Texas adoption of its Tort Claims Act – that now the misdeeds of public institutions and their employees will not go unchallenged.
  • Lifting the lid on Long Island's courts

    Gus Garcia-Roberts and Will Van Sant dug out the hidden details of a fraud and drug investigation or Robert Macedonio, one of Suffolk County's most influential and flamboyant lawyers, that revealed allegations of serious corruption within the district attorney's office and kicked off a year-long effort by Newsday's investigative team to expose secrecy, cronyism and strong evidence of high-level criminality in the operation of the criminal-justice system.
  • Not So Securus: Massive Hack of 70 Million Prisoner Phone Calls Indicates Violations of Attorney-Client Privilege

    The Intercept obtained a massive database of leaked phone records belonging to prison telecom giant Securus Technologies — accessed by an anonymous hacker and submitted to The Intercept via SecureDrop. By analyzing its contents, “Not So Securus” provided an unprecedented illustration of the sheer scale of phone surveillance of detainees within the criminal justice system, revealing how such monitoring has gone far beyond the stated goal of ensuring the security of prison facilities to compromise the privacy of inmates and their loved ones — and potentially violate the confidential communications guaranteed to prisoners and their lawyers.
  • Families behind the wall: The rise and fall of family detention

    A series of exclusive reports on alleged misconduct and abuse at the Obama administration’s family detention centers. There are more than 50 stories exposing a pattern of accused mistreatment of detainees – some of whom said they were sexually assaulted by guards in front of their children – at three federal facilities run by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement operated in rural Pennsylvania and Texas, far from any major city and the lawyers who worked there.
  • The Settlement

    Armen Keteyian reports on the NFL's controversial concussion settlement and the pivotal Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy or CTE issue. In addition to family members of a retired NFL star who committed suicide, he speaks to formers players, their lawyers and a neuroscientist for the most significant television report yet on the subject.
  • The Jerome Hayes Case

    Jerome Hayes had alibis. He passed a lie detector test. The prosecutor said she believed someone else committed the crimes. A detective questioned why Hayes was still in jail. Yet Hayes stayed in a Jacksonville jail cell for 589 days only to be released with all charges dropped. The Florida Times-Union examined what happened in the case and what errors police, prosecutors and defense lawyers made. And as the paper reported on the Hayes case, it uncovered longstanding and wide-reaching records violations by the police. http://static.jacksonville.com/files/jeromehayescase/
  • A Game of Chicken

    Over the course of a decade, the U.S. Department of Agriculture had not one, not two, not three, but four opportunities to warn the public about salmonella outbreaks involving Foster Farms chicken. Each time, they hemmed and hawed, worrying more about the threat of legal action from a corporate giant than about protecting consumers. Health reporter Lynne Terry was the first journalist in America to identify and write about this alarming trend. With reporters from Frontline, The Center for Investigative Reporting and the New York Times circling around the story, she beat them all with a stunning and illuminating examination of the failures of the USDA. In her year-long investigation, Terry set out to determine if the USDA’s notoriously slow handling of a major salmonella outbreak in 2013-2014 was an isolated case. It wasn’t. She reviewed thousands of pages of previously undisclosed documents dating back to 2003. What she found was disturbing: More than 1,000 people had rushed to their doctors with bouts of food poisoning. They had no idea what made them sick. But federal regulators did. Those same federal officials took virtually no steps to protect consumers from bad chicken. Health officials in Oregon and Washington had pushed vigorously for federal action, having identified clear and convincing evidence of problems. But the USDA wouldn’t budge. Terry’s meticulous reporting identified these themes: •USDA officials are afraid of lawsuits. The agency is so worried about being sued by companies that they’ve set an almost impossible bar for evidence, even rejecting samples of tainted chicken that state health agencies believed would help clinch their case. •Government inspectors are pressured to go easy on food processors. In one notable case, the USDA transferred an inspector after Foster Farms complained he wrote too many citations. •The USDA succumbed to further pressure from Foster Farms. After strong pushback from the company’s lawyers, the agency backed away from citing an unequivocal connection linking the company to a 2004 outbreak – even though the evidence pointed only to Foster Farms.