Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "litigation" ...

  • The Deerfield Scroll: Gender discrimination and sexual violence alleged at elite boarding school

    Two respected teachers - also husband and wife - left our school abruptly with little public explanation. I investigated their departure and learned that the female teacher had filed an explosive lawsuit against my school alleging a years-long pattern of sexual discrimination and of alleged sexual violence against female students. I was under tremendous pressure by some faculty members and others to drop the story but I was determined to get it published so that my school could confront the serious issues raised in the litigation.
  • NYT: Using FOIA To Open Access to the Government in the Trump Era

    The regulatory and legal system that for the last 50 years has protected the environment in the United States--the air that we breathe, the water we drink, the food we eat, and the toxic chemicals we encounter--is facing an assault unlike anything since the modern environmental movement began in the 1960s. The New York Times in the past year has committed an extraordinary amount of resources not just to investigate the controversies inside the headquarters of the Environmental Protection Agency. But we also have fanned out across the United States to document the real impact this radical shift in regulatory policy is having, via an ambitious investigative project that demanded all of the skills journalism can deliver from FOIAs, to databases, to litigation, to government sources, narrative storytelling and innovative online and print presentations. It is one of the biggest stories of our times. And no one has covered it as aggressively as The New York Times. FOIA, for almost every piece we have published, has been a critical part of our reporting.
  • NYT: Trump's Assault on the Environment

    The regulatory and legal system that for the last 50 years has protected the environment in the United States--the air that we breathe, the water we drink, the food we eat, and the toxic chemicals we encounter--is facing an assault unlike anything since the modern environmental movement began in the 1960s. The New York Times in the past year has committed an extraordinary amount of resources not just to investigate the controversies inside the headquarters of the Environmental Protection Agency. But we also have fanned out across the United States to document the real impact this radical shift in regulatory policy is having, via an ambitious investigative project that demanded all of the skills journalism can deliver from FOIAs, to databases, to litigation, to government sources, narrative storytelling and innovative online and print presentations. It is one of the biggest stories of our times. And no one has covered it as aggressively as The New York Times.
  • NYT: This Is Our Reality Now

    The regulatory and legal system that for the last 50 years has protected the environment in the United States--the air that we breathe, the water we drink, the food we eat, and the toxic chemicals we encounter--is facing an assault unlike anything since the modern environmental movement began in the 1960s. The New York Times in the past year has committed an extraordinary amount of resources not just to investigate the controversies inside the headquarters of the Environmental Protection Agency. But we also have fanned out across the United States to document the real impact this radical shift in regulatory policy is having, via an ambitious investigative project that demanded all of the skills journalism can deliver from FOIAs, to databases, to litigation, to government sources, narrative storytelling and innovative online and print presentations. It is one of the biggest stories of our times. And no one has covered it as aggressively as The New York Times.
  • 60 Minutes: 100,000 Women

    More than 100,000 American women are suing over a medical device implanted in their bodies called gynecological mesh in what has become the largest multi-district litigation since asbestos. Scott Pelley reports on one manufacturer of the devices, Boston Scientific, which is facing 48,000 lawsuits.
  • Cash for Compliance?

    In their ongoing "Cash for Compliance?" series, the reporters revealed how a group called Advocates for Individuals with Disabilities (AID) grossly exploited the Americans with Disabilities Act and leveraged it into a money-making machine cloaked as a non-profit organization. The reporters have produced more than two dozen stories that systematically unraveled AID's multi-layered enterprise and showed its deception, hypocrisy, motives and players. Their major findings include: - AID’s own facilities had the same violations as the 1700 businesses they’ve sued. - No one with disabilities ever visited the businesses AID sued. - The IRS granted AID official non-profit status. However, on its IRS application, the reporters uncovered AID didn’t disclose any information about its lawsuits and its plan to self-fund through litigation. The reporters also revealed that AID set up other business entities that shuffle funds. - AID is secretly funded and backed by a controversial entrepreneur with a history of consumer fraud. - The lead attorney for AID has a history of ethical violations. The reporters also discovered that he made repeated mistakes in AID’s lawsuits. The State Bar of Arizona has interviewed many of the people featured in their reports.
  • University Presidents Tackle Football's Future

    Medical science, lawsuits and money are changing the landscape for college football. What do university presidents have to say about the future of a sport that causes brain damage? We contacted every Division I university president assuring them their responses would be published in their entirety. Watch University Presidents Tackle Football's Future for an overview and a surprising finding about university presidents being questioned about concussions, the risk of the concussion litigation and the cost of college athletics. http://www.presidentalfootball.com http://www.presidentialfootball.com/
  • All of a sudden there was fire

    This article reports that adoption of precautionary measures to prevent patients from being set on fire in operating rooms across the country has been slow, often implemented only after hospitals experience an accident. Advocates say it’s not clear how many hospitals have instituted the available protocols, and no national safety authority tracks the frequency of surgical fires, which are thought to injure patients in one of every three incidents. About 240 surgical fires occur every year, according to rough estimates. But fires may be underreported because of fear of litigation or bad publicity.
  • Medicare Unmasked

    The Wall Street Journal forced the government in 2014 to release important Medicare data kept secret for decades, and in a sweeping investigative series analyzed it to uncover abuses that cost taxpayers. In April, the U.S. made public Medicare billing data by doctors for the first time since 1979. The government acted because of successful litigation by Journal parent Dow Jones & Co. and amid persistent reporting on Medicare by Journal reporters.
  • Below The Radar

    Mario Diaz exposed several of air traffic controllers returning to FAA towers or control centers with little or no accountability shortly after being a contributing factor to a deadly crash. As detailed in the series of “Below The Radar” reports, these crashes resulted in 104 deaths. The litigation produced from several of these crashes came at a steep price to American taxpayers. Diaz uncovered public records (Department of Treasury and Federal judgements) indicating that the Federal Government made either verdict or settlement payments in excess of $100-million dollars to the estate of the victims --- including the estate of the pilots involved in these crashes.