Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "london" ...

  • Yemen's War: Made in America

    When a Saudi air strike hit a school bus in August killing 40 children, CNN’s Nima Elbagir was ahead of her competitors in covering the event from London using footage and information from a cadre of carefully vetted Yemen-based journalists. Using this local network, and with the consultation of weapons experts, Nima and her team proved the bomb used in the attack was US-made. Then they went further and obtained exclusive access to documentation on a string of other civilian bombings in Yemen, proving that in many cases the rain of death in Yemen is made in America.
  • Toronto Star - Secrets of the Four Seasons

    In the middle of one of the hottest real estate markets in the world, a surprising number of residents in Toronto's most luxurious condo development are selling at a loss. The Toronto Star dug deep to figure out why and discovered that the Ontario property market is open to abuse because people can buy and sell anonymously. While other hot markets like New York, London and Vancouver have made moves to increase transparency, Toronto remains vulnerable to money laundering and tax evasion.
  • The Disappearance of Jamal Khashoggi

    CNN was across the mysterious disappearance of Jamal Khashoggi with its Istanbul team the day the Saudi journalist vanished. As the mystery deepened and Saudi Arabia continued to insist that Khashoggi had left the consulate, CNN worked the story from Istanbul, Ankara, Riyadh, London and Washington. Crucially, CNN broke a number of stories in the developing mystery which shed light on what really happened and Saudi Arabia’s role.
  • The Disappearance of Jamal Khashoggi

    CNN was across the mysterious disappearance of Jamal Khashoggi with its Istanbul team the day the Saudi journalist vanished. As the mystery deepened and Saudi Arabia continued to insist that Khashoggi had left the consulate, CNN worked the story from Istanbul, Ankara, Riyadh, London and Washington. Crucially CNN broke a number of stories in the developing mystery which shed light on what really happened and Saudi Arabia’s role.
  • Dark Money: London's dirty secret

    ''Dark Money: London's Dirty Secret'' pierced a world that is normally hidden from all but those who enjoy great wealth or great power: the world of financial secrecy. At a moment when public debate is dominated by inequality and tax evasion, the Financial Times turned a glaring spotlight on the City of London and explained its role in a global system of illicit finance that serves the kleptocrats, criminals and the super-rich. One of the most-read stories of the year on FT.com, Dark Money was a riveting narrative that exposed a system designed to look impenetrable to outsiders. The City’s secrecy specialists spin webs of front companies, offshore accounts and dummy directors that allow tainted wealth to flow around the globe incognito. This system takes dirty money and makes it look clean. It creates a secret world whose existence is corrosive to the rest of society – a piggy bank for untouchable power.
  • Killers Inc.

    Killers Inc. investigates the attempted assassination of the prominent Russian banker and businessman Gherman Gorbuntsov in London in 2012. The documentary traces the origins of the attempt to The Republic of Moldova, where our reporters meet Renat Usatii, a controversial pro-Russian Moldovan politician who Gorbuntsov says orchestrated his assassination attempt. As the investigation unfolds in real-time, our reporters come face to face with the employer of Gorbuntsov’s alleged assassin, Ion Druta, who takes us down a rabbit hole where the forces behind the assassination attempt are revealed. Major Findings: •Renat Usatii, a powerful Moldovan politician, was allegedly sent from Russia to Moldova to represent the interests of the powerful Russians from who Gorbuntsov stole money. •Gherman Gorbuntsov, a former banker for the Kremlin-run Russian Railways, allegedly stole hundreds of million dollars from businessmen connected to the Russian Railways and Russian organized crime groups. •Renat Usatii allegedly received support from Russian intelligence services and other influential Russian figures in his bid to build a pro-Russian Moldovan political party. •Vitalie Proca, Gorbuntsov’s alleged assassin, is part of an organized crime group based in Transdniestria and Moldova that offers criminal services for oligarchs, politicians and other crime groups who are soliciting murder, extortion or debt collection. The group is led by a Vor v Zakone named Nicu Patron.
  • The Doping Scandal: sport’s dirtiest secret

    This blood doping investigation exposed for the first time the extraordinary extent of cheating by athletes at the world's most prestigious events. The story was based on a database which was leaked by a whistle-blower who was disturbed by the failure of the authorities to tackle the problem. It provided a devastating insight into the blood test results of 5,000 athletes dating from the turn of the century to the London Olympics. Many were shown to have risked death by recklessly using transfusions or banned red-cell-boosting drugs which made their blood so thick they should have been seeking hospital treatment rather than competing. http://features.thesundaytimes.co.uk/web/public/2015/the-doping-scandal/index.html#/
  • Wayward Hayward

    The Daily was working an investigation into BP’s $20 billion victim’s compensation fund. While interviewing the Alabama Attorney General they learned the AG was going to be traveling to London to depose BP’s former CEO. With that in mind, they filed a records request for copies of any and all depositions. The request paid off when The Daily scored an exclusive copy of Hayward’s grueling videotaped deposition.
  • Embassy Construction

    For this story, Nancy Cordes and the producers working with her took a much closer look at the State Department’s new “Design Excellence” initiative for embassy construction and found it had some serious problems. The new embassy in London, nicknamed ‘The Cube’ that is currently under construction is $100 million over the original cost estimate. CBS found its glass was problematic to say the least. We broke the news that the thick glass for the building is acquired in Germany, shipped to Connecticut and then shipped back to London for construction. Critics told us they are concerned that the State Department is sacrificing safety and cost to make new embassies “pretty”. Our story looked at other embassies as well including a new building in Papua New Guinea where the cost has ballooned from $50 million to $211 million. In light of the terrorist attack in Benghazi, an independent review of embassy construction by former State Department officials found that delays in “design excellence” embassies meant that State Department employees were in harm’s way for longer periods of time.
  • Terrance Carter

    In the summer of 2014, Terrence P. Carter, a highly regarded “school-turnaround” administrator from the Chicago-based Academy for Urban School Leadership, was hailed by public officials and the local press in New London, Connecticut, as an innovator who could revive that city’s failing school system. After a national search, the school board in June voted unanimously to hire him as its new superintendent, effective Aug. 1. In early July the local newspaper, the Day of New London, reported that when Carter toured the city, he was welcomed with praise such as a pronouncement by the mayor that he was “the right fit at the right time for New London." But everything changed on July 18, when the Courant published an investigative story on its website documenting a pattern in which Carter had repeatedly claimed to have a doctorate, and referred to himself as “Dr.” or “Ph.D” for more than five years, without actually holding such a degree.