Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "loopholes" ...

  • Zombie Campaigns

    Zombie Campaigns is an in-depth look at the spending habits of 102 former congresspeople who kept spending campaign donations as if they were still campaigning well after they left office. The reporting uncovered a wealth of personal spending and shone a light on loopholes that allowed some politicians to continue spending for decades after they retired, and in some cases even after they died. Along with the story, we published a searchable database of spending by those candidates we identified as running a zombie campaign.
  • WSAW: A Dying Wish

    After receiving a letter from a woman who was found dead, WSAW-TV's investigative reporter uncovered loopholes regarding the creation of churches, all while discovering small mistakes made by a county, a state agency and a federal agency allowing a church, some trustees call fake, to exist.
  • Texas Observer: Access Denied

    The Texas Public Information Act is under attack. The law, which ensures the public’s access to government records, has taken a beating from state Supreme Court jurists, lawmakers and state agencies since it was passed in 1973. Once a shining example of government transparency, the law has been eroded by a growing list of loopholes for everything from ongoing police investigations and the dates of birth of government employees to information related to executions. Journalists are well aware of this problem, but it had never been presented to the public in a deep-dive feature until now. “Access Denied” reveals that government officials can delay, derail and deny requests by slow-walking them or charging exorbitant fees. This piece was reported over six months and included interviews with dozens of government officials, investigative journalists, citizen activists and researchers.
  • Why is it ‘easy’ to steal from youth sports?

    Our investigation exposed how a prominent youth sports league that went to the Little League World Series was being ripped off by adult leaders. When we looked statewide, we found gaping loopholes in youth sport finances.
  • Two-Hour Diploma

    “Two-Hour Diploma” started with a late-night hotline tip in February of 2018. Ten months later, at the time of this entry, the shock waves it produced continue to reverberate throughout the state of Maryland. Using deep dive, old-fashioned investigative journalism, this series produced results. A Baltimore high school was shut down after Fox45 enrolled an undercover student who received a diploma in two hours. Multiple state investigations were launched leading to other schools being shut down. Lawmakers, including the Governor, promised legislative action in Annapolis when session opens in January. And Fox45 jumped right through the massive loopholes this investigation exposed by opening our own church and school – right under the state’s nose. Two weeks after filing the paperwork, Good News Academy was certified and approved by the Maryland State Department of Education. As all this was unfolding, investigative reporter Chris Papst was sued by a school operator and physical threats were made against Papst and Fox45 for which the police were called. In an effort to stop the investigation, Fox45’s sources were threatened with violence and had their property vandalized. “Two-Hour Diploma” was produced by Project Baltimore, a team of Fox45 journalists committed to a long-term investigation of education in the Baltimore area.
  • Toxic Safety

    A child’s car seat is the only consumer product that is required by law in all 50 states and it is crucial to keep a child safe in the car. However, this investigation revealed false advertising, legal loopholes and outdated federal regulations are exposing millions of children to concerning, even known-cancer-causing chemicals, in their car seats with no apparent safety benefit. Over the course of a year, KPIX lit car seats on fire, commissioned lab tests on car seats and the kids who use them, searched public records, mined social media, analyzed national car fire data and interviewed experts from every applicable industry. The resulting series sparked action by lawmakers, industry groups, consumer advocates, federal regulators and car seat
  • The Debt Trap

    This weeklong investigative series revealed how car-title lending businesses in Virginia are using loopholes in the law to exploit consumers and evade regulators. Since the series aired, the governor announced he wants to crack down on the industry and several lawmakers introduced bills to address loopholes outlined in the stories. http://wamu.org/the_debt_trap
  • Compounding Pharmacy Fraud

    CBS News investigates how compounding pharmacies are exploiting insurance loopholes to bill thousands of dollars for medications that in many case don’t provide any clinical benefits. In this multi-part series, we examine how compounded drugs are marketed and who is being prescribed the medications, costing private insurance companies and the military billions of dollars in waste and fraud. https://vimeo.com/cbseveningnews/review/149805761/f1a2ddc09e
  • Wired for Profit

    Sports gambling sites have taken advantage of loopholes in gambling laws, or flouted them completely, creating a multibillion-dollar business that skirts regulators and international borders, using Internet tools that deceive even about where the sites are located.
  • Seafood From Slaves

    The Associated Press team uncovered a slave island and relentlessly exposed horrific labor abuses in Thailand's $7 billion annual seafood export industry. During their year-long investigation, Margie Mason, Robin McDowell, Martha Mendoza and Esther Htusan tied seafood caught and processed by trapped workers to the supply chains of almost every major U.S. retailer including Wal-Mart, Kroger, Sysco and Nestle. The reporters used images from space to track down runaway slave ships in Papua New Guinea and dug up loopholes in federal law allowing imports to continue unchecked. When Thailand¹s government said the abuses all occur in foreign territory, the journalists focused on factories just outside its capital, Bangkok where they found children and poor migrants locked inside and forced to peel shrimp. Tapping AP colleagues in all 50 states and eight countries, they documented how those seafood supply chains spread around the world. http://interactives.ap.org/2015/seafood-from-slaves/?START=freedom https://vimeo.com/151181618 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9IeJOnCQlj0&feature=youtu.be https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vgYgAVQG5lk&feature=youtu.be