Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "lottery" ...

  • Gaming the Lottery: An International Investigation of the Nearly $300 Billion Industry

    This project extended our investigation into the global lottery industry. In 2018 we revealed Massachusetts’ failure to implement the policy it had announced to monitor frequent lottery winners and the state’s wildly inequitable system of distributing lottery proceeds, the cynical targeting of poor people in Bolivia and systemic corruption in the South African lottery. We filed more than a dozen FOIA requests, analyzed hundreds of thousands of records, read hundreds of documents, scraped 17 years of lottery grant recipients’ data. We conducted dozens of interviews, generated widespread media pickup and interest from colleagues in multiple countries, Our findings and reporting led to arrests and official investigations in the United States and South Africa.
  • Against the Odds

    The Charlotte Observer found lottery players who beat staggering odds so consistently that statisticians said chances of being that lucky were less than one in a trillion.
  • Driven to death by phone scammers

    It started with a call from Jamaica and ended in a suicide in a Tennessee basement. In between, Albert Poland Jr. had sent tens of thousands of dollars to the man on the phone promising millions. At 81 and suffering from dementia, Poland had fallen victim to a lottery scam that costs thousands of Americans an estimated $300 million annually -- and has turned deadly in both countries.
  • Gaming the Lottery

    The Palm Beach Post analyzed the Florida Lottery's 20-year database of winners and applied mathematical analysis to reveal that some people were winning the lottery too often, exposing fraud and forcing the lottery to make changes.
  • Gambling in New York

    A four-part series with three sidebars looking at the winners and losers in New York State's 40-year experiment with gambling as a creator of state revenue and jobs. The series was timed to appear as the state's voters considered whether to open New York to full-scale gambling.
  • Welfare Exposed

    Through a persistent and meticulous investigation, this series of reports exposed how Pennsylvania tax dollars are being carelessly mishandled by the state's most funded, yet most secretive, department: Public Welfare. This investigation broke new ground in detailing how the state is failing to protect taxpayer dollars. From big-time lottery winners still collecting to cultural rot within the department, this series shocked the department's own Secretary, who called our findings "appalling." Via privacy laws, the state has created a system that limits its own accountability. This series circumvented those limitations.
  • State of Play

    With little to no public disclosure, the corporation that runs lotteries for the four Canadian Atlantic provinces embarked on a speculative -- and potentially risky -- hunt for new business oportunities online and overseas.
  • Is the City's Affordable Housing Lottery Rigged?

    A detailed investigation of the Boston Redevelopment Authority questions how it funds its operations.
  • "Welfare Waste"

    Welfare funds can be, and often are, misused. A review of "two million state welfare transactions" by the KSTP-TV team reveals that EBT cards were used more than 100 times in liquor stores during the course of one month. They also found the money was spent on things like lottery tickets and tattoos, and the practice is entirely legal.
  • The Casino Kings

    The state of South Dakota partners with thousands of bars and restaurants that offer video gambling. The state takes in more than $100 million each year from the games, but basic information about who owns and operates the establishments is hidden from public view by state law. Using liquor license records and business registrations, the newspaper built a backdoor database of owners, officers and financiers that took six months. The reporting revealed a consolidation of licenses by a handful of individuals and partnerships in the state's most lucrative markets.